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We’re here with information and resources.

We’re here for you.

The Baker College Academics department provides support and coordination for all academic areas at Baker College, including the academic calendar, curriculum, counseling and advising, recordkeeping, and services for individuals with special needs.

If you have a question or concern that’s not answered here, please contact us. Our goal is to help you achieve your educational objectives, and one of the important ways we do that is by providing information, resources, and advisory services.

Whether you are seeking career advice, counseling, looking for academic records, or looking to change a course or program, we’re ready to help.

FAQ'S

  • Is there online tutoring for APA styles?

    Online students can find help with APA citations and formatting in their Blackboard classroom.

    • Cick the Online Tutoring button on the left-hand side of the page.
    • Click on Schedules. 
    • Click on English (between Economics and Finance).
    • Click the Enroll button next to APA Questions & Answers Classroom.
    • Click Submit.

    After you enroll in the APA Classroom, you'll find all the available APA-related resources. You can also ask questions on the Discussion Board, which is monitored by Baker's online librarians. For more information, contact us at library@baker.edu.

  • How do I sign up for tutoring?

    Contact Learning Support Services on your campus to sign up for tutoring. If you're a Baker Online student or the in a Center for Graduate Studies program, you may request tutoring by visiting Blackboard's Community tab, in the Institution Discussion Boards area.

  • If a new disability evaluation is needed, who pays for it?

    Neither your high school nor your postsecondary school is required to conduct or pay for a new evaluation to document your disability and need for accommodations.

  • Do I have to prove that I have a disability to receive accommodations?

    Yes. You are required to provide relevant comprehensive documentation that without the services you would not have equal access.

  • Do I have to inform a postsecondary school that I have a disability?

    No. However, if you want the school to provide an accommodation, you must identify yourself as having a disability.

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Baker College Academic Resources

Academics

We’re here with information and resources.

We’re here for you.

The Baker College Academics department provides support and coordination for all academic areas at Baker College, including the academic calendar, curriculum, counseling and advising, recordkeeping, and services for individuals with special needs.

If you have a question or concern that’s not answered here, please contact us. Our goal is to help you achieve your educational objectives, and one of the important ways we do that is by providing information, resources, and advisory services.

Whether you are seeking career advice, counseling, looking for academic records, or looking to change a course or program, we’re ready to help.

Academic Calendar

Spring 2014

On-Ground:  April 3 - June 25
Online First Session:  April 3 - May 14
Online Second Session:  May 15 - June 25

Fall 2014

On-Ground:  September 29 - December 13
Online First Session:  September 25 - November 5
Online Second Session:  November 6 - December 17


Winter 2015

On-Ground:  January 12 - March 20
Online First Session:  January 8 - February 18
Online Second Session:  February 19 - April 1

Spring 2015

On-Ground:  April 6 - June 12
Online First Session:  April 2 - May 13
Online Second Session:  May 14 - June 24

Summer 2015

On-Ground:  June 29 - August 29
Online First Session:  June 25 - August 5
Online Second Session:  August 6 - September 16

Fall 2015

On-Ground:  September 28 - December 12
Online First Session:  September 24 - November 4
Online Second Session:  November 5 - December 16


Winter 2016

On-Ground:  January 11 - March 19
Online First Session:  January 7 - February 17
Online Second Session:  February 18 - March 30

Spring 2016

On-Ground:  April 4 - June 11
Online First Session:  March 31 - May 11
Online Second Session:  May 12 - June 22

Summer 2016

On-Ground:  June 27 - August 27
Online First Session:  June 23 - August 3
Online Second Session:  August 4 - September 14

Fall 2016

On-Ground:  September 26 - December 10
Online First Session:  September 22 - November 2
Online Second Session:  November 3 - December 14


Winter 2017

On-Ground:  January 9 - March 18
Online First Session:  January 5 - February 15
Online Second Session:  February 16 - March 29

Spring 2017

On-Ground:  April 3 - June 10
Online First Session:  March 30 - May 10
Online Second Session:  May 11 - June 21

Summer 2017

On-Ground:  June 26 - August 26
Online First Session:  June 22 - August 2
Online Second Session:  August 3 - September 13

Fall 2017

On-Ground:  September 25 - December 9
Online First Session:  September 21 - November 1
Online Second Session:  November 2 - December 13


Winter 2018

On-Ground:  January 8 - March 17
Online First Session:  January 4 - February 14
Online Second Session:  February 15 - March 28

Spring 2018

On-Ground:  April 2 - June 19
Online First Session:  March 29 - May 9
Online Second Session:  May 10 - June 20

Summer 2018

On-Ground:  June 25 - August 25
Online First Session:  June 21 - August 1
Online Second Session:  August 2 - September 12

Fall 2018

On-Ground:  September 24 - December 8
Online First Session:  September 20 - October 31
Online Second Session:  November 1 - December 12


Winter 2019

On-Ground:  January 7 - March 16
Online First Session:  January 3 - February 13
Online Second Session:  February 14 - March 27

Spring 2019

On-Ground:  April 1 - June 8
Online First Session:  March 28 - May 8
Online Second Session:  May 9 - June 19

Summer 2019

On-Ground:  June 224 - August 24
Online First Session:  June 20 - July 31
Online Second Session:  August 1 - September 11

Fall 2019

On-Ground:  September 30 - December 14
Online First Session:  September 26 - November 6
Online Second Session:  November 7 - December 18


Winter 2020

On-Ground:  January 13 - March 21
Online First Session:  January 9 - February 19
Online Second Session:  February 20 - April 1

Spring 2020

On-Ground:  April 6 - June 13
Online First Session:  April 2 - May 13
Online Second Session:  May 14 - June 24

Summer 2020

On-Ground:  June 29 - August 29
Online First Session:  June 25 - August 5
Online Second Session:  August 6 - September 16

Policies and Procedures

The policies and procedures of Baker College guide our faculty, staff, and students in achieving our mission: to provide quality higher education and training which enable graduates to be successful throughout challenging and rewarding careers. 

Specific information about our academic policies can be found through the resources below, along with information about office hours and policies for each campus.

Philosophy of Developmental Education

Developmental Education Mission Statement

The mission of developmental education is to provide a comprehensive preparatory program enabling students to acquire academic skills necessary to complete a college-level course of study.

Developmental Education Goals

  1. Provide appropriate educational opportunities and services
  2. Ensure proper placement of students
  3. Maintain high academic standards that support student success in college-level courses
  4. Enhance the quality of student learning
  5. Promote continued development and application of adult learning theory, adhering to best practices
  6. Provide students with opportunities to build strong foundational skills
  7. Be sensitive and responsive to individual differences among students
  8. Promote a collaborative and supportive environment for faculty, staff, and students

Developmental Education Objectives

  1. Entry-level students will complete appropriate placement testing.
  2. Students will use developmental education resources provided by the College.
  3. Students will demonstrate reasoning, communication, and comprehension skills required for college-level work.
  4. Students will demonstrate competency in reading, writing, and mathematics through exit processes.

The following courses are designed to meet the above objectives:

  • ENG 091 - English Review
  • ENG 098B - College Reading
  • MTH 091 - Essential Math Concepts
  • MTH 099E - Pre-Algebra

In addition to these developmental education courses, other developmental courses, specific to a program area, may be required. See individual program requirements for details.

Developmental Courses

Baker College supports its Right-to-Try Admissions Policy with several educational services. Some students who enter Baker College require assistance to meet the pressures of an academic community. Because of this, Baker College provides these students with a developmental education program which enables them to achieve success in college and their future careers.

  1. Students with below college-level reading skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in College Reading (ENG 098B).
  2. Students with below college-level English writing skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in English Review (ENG 091).
  3. Students with below college-level math skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in Essential Math Concepts (MTH 091) and/or Pre-Algebra (MTH 099E).
  4. Students who place into these developmental areas should take the developmental course(s) the first quarter. These courses should be completed within the first academic year, prior to enrolling in a college-level general education course.
  5. Students who place into two or three developmental areas, one of which is MTH 091 Essential Math Concepts, are required to enroll part time (less than 12 credits) the first quarter of attendance only.
  6. Students must successfully complete all required developmental education courses. Successful completion of each of the developmental courses requires passing a consistent exit assessment that demonstrates a minimum standard of competency in order to enroll in the subsequent college-level courses. Students unable to successfully complete (pass) any one or more of the developmental education courses (ENG 091, ENG 098B, MTH 091, MTH 099E) within three attempts, including withdrawals, will face academic dismissal from the College. For both the second and third attempts, students are placed on a Student Learning Contract. (A second attempt contract serves as a warning, and a third attempt contract serves as notice of the student facing academic dismissal.)
Accreditation – MBA

Master of Business Adminstration (MBA) Program

External peer review is the primary means of assuring and improving the quality of higher education institutions and programs in the United States. This recognition is accomplished through program accreditation, approval or certification.

Baker College has received specialized accreditation for its business programs through the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) located at 11374 Strang Line Road in Lenexa, Kansas, USA. The business program in the following degree is accredited by the IACBE:

  • Master of Business Administration

Master’s Level IACBE Outcomes

In master’s-level programs, knowledge of the key content areas and functional disciplines of business is assumed. Graduates of master’s-level programs should acquire a depth of knowledge in these areas that exceeds that of the typical bachelor’s degree graduate. Graduates of master’s-level programs in business should be able to:

  1. Recognize problems.
  2. Integrate theory and practice for the purpose of strategic analysis.
  3. Employ and apply quantitative techniques and methods in the analysis of real-world business situations.
  4. Communicate to relevant audiences;  graduates should be able to:
    a.    Compose clear, consistent, and effective written forms of communication
    b.  Compose and present effective oral business presentations.
  5. Work effectively with a team of colleagues on diverse projects.
  6. Identify and analyze the ethical obligations and responsibilities of business.

MBA Program - IACBE Assessment Reports
 


MBA Program - Annual Assessment Reports
 


The MBA program provides the following majors:
 

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Academic Standing

Undergraduate
Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 to graduate from any program. For students to stay off academic probation, the following grade point averages must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-16 1.5
17-32 1.65
33-48 1.80
49-64 1.90
65+ 2.00

Graduate
Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 to graduate. A grade of “C” or better is required in all classes used to calculate hours for graduation. For students to stay off academic probation, the following grade point averages must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-12 2.75
13-24 2.87
25-Graduation 3.00

Academic Probation Policy

If the student’s cumulative GPA falls below the appropriate minimum GPA required to remain in good academic standing as illustrated on the step scale, the student will be placed on academic probation for the following quarter. The student will be advised to restrict his/her course load and curtail extracurricular activities and work schedules. If the student attains a satisfactory GPA according to the step scale in the probationary quarter, but his/her cumulative GPA is still below the step scale, the student will remain on probation for the next quarter.

Removal from Academic Probation

The student will be removed from academic probation at the end of the quarter in which his/her cumulative GPA places him/her in good academic standing as illustrated on the step scale.

Academic Suspension Policy

Students are academically suspended based on either of the following:

  • A student receives all failures his/her first quarter.
  • A student on academic probation who earns a GPA at the end of the probationary quarter lower than that called for by the step scale.

Consideration for re-enrollment will be given to academically suspended students only after an absence of at least one academic quarter. Requests to re-enroll are processed through the Academic Department.

Students who were living in Baker College housing at the time of academic suspension must reapply in order to be readmitted to college housing.

Academic Dismissal

Students are academically dismissed based on either of the following:

  • A student is unable to successfully complete (pass) any developmental education course within three attempts (one attempt for COL115).
  • A student received a prior academic suspension and his/her GPA falls below the step scale regarding good academic standing.

Baker College reserves the right to academically dismiss any student whose level of achievement makes it inadvisable for the student to remain in school. Students who are academically dismissed may not attend classes in any future quarter, unless they apply for and receive Academic Amnesty. Readmission for developmental education academic dismissal may be considered earlier than the four year requirement if the student produces documentation of transferable college-level math and English courses which were completed following dismissal from Baker College. If a student requests Amnesty after four years and retakes COMPASS, he/she may be readmitted if COMPASS scores indicate that no developmental courses are needed.

Academic Amnesty: Fresh Start Program

The Fresh Start Program, which is for undergraduate students only, allows students with poor academic records who have not attended Baker College for at least four years to resume their college education with a clean slate. A student with a poor academic record is defined as a student who is not in good academic standing. If a student is approved for the Fresh Start Program, all previous grades and courses will be excluded from the computation of the student’s grade point average. Courses passed with a “C” or better can count as a credit grade for program requirements and graduation. All courses and all grades remain on the student’s transcript with a notation of Fresh Start on the transcript. The Fresh Start Program can only be used once by a student. Requests should be made in the Registrar’s Office, with final approval from the Chief Academic Officer/Vice President for Academics. Approval for academic amnesty must be received prior to the end of the quarter in which the student returns. Once a student is granted academic amnesty, the student’s permanent record cannot be changed.

The Fresh Start Program will not supersede the Baker College Satisfactory Academic Progress Rules for receiving federal and state financial aid funds, which are based on cumulative grades, hours attempted, and hours completed. If a “Fresh Start” student is in violation of the financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Rules and wishes to establish eligibility for those funds, an appeal for re-instatement must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office.

Testing

Baker College offers many non-traditional credit options for students with varied academic and professional backgrounds. It is a policy of Baker College to award credit to those with the appropriate experience.

For more information about the types of testing available on your campus, contact:

Waiver Tests

Waiver test credit may be earned for skills already developed. This credit is awarded based on an examination developed by Baker College in the subject area.

Credit By Examination

These national credit by examination programs offer students the opportunity to demonstrate their academic proficiency in various general education and specific subject areas. Such proficiency may have been developed by the student outside of a traditional classroom through such means as personal reading, adult education courses, job experiences, etc.

Please visit the Web sites listed below for specific information regarding national credit by examination programs:

If you would like to schedule CLEP and DANTES testing, (available only on the Flint Campus) contact the Testing Services Department by email at fltesting@baker.edu or by callilng (810) 766-4300.

For more information about credit by examination available on your campus, please call the contact listed above.

WorkKeys® Assessments

WorkKeys® is a workplace skills assessment system used by employers, students, workers, and educators across the nation. The WorkKeys® system from ACT is being introduced in high schools across the country to help students understand how to improve job and career skills for better-paying jobs. WorkKeys® measures skills in:

  • Reading for Information
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Listening
  • Writing
  • Locating Information
  • Business Writing
  • Teamwork

These are skills that employers feel are critical to job success. WorkKeys® assessment results demonstrate current ability level to employers. These assessments help businesses and educators understand each other’s needs. The goal is to ensure that students enter the work force with a strong foundation that enables them to do well in their chosen career.

If you would like to learn more about WorkKeys, or to schedule a test:

Registrar

Baker College Registrars are here to help you meet your educational goals as quickly and efficiently as possible. We can help you with:

  • Program changes and other course registration concerns
  • Advice for bachelor degrees
  • Non-traditional credit
  • Transfer of credits 
  • Graduation requirements
  • Certifications
  • Registrations
  • Transcripts and other academic records

Baker College offers many non-traditional credit options for students with varied academic and professional backgrounds. Non-traditional credit may include:

  • Articulation
  • Experiential credit
  • Credit by examination
  • CLEP
  • Advanced placement

To learn more about non-traditional credit, please visit our sections on Articulation or Testing. You can also call the Academic Office for more information.

Open Class List

The Open Class List can also be found at https://carina.baker.edu/dlvopen

Graduation Application

All students who anticipate successful completion of their program course requirements for a degree or certificate must complete the Graduation Application one quarter prior to their graduation date in order to officially graduate.

You can fill out the Graduation Application online or by visting the Academic Office on your campus.

Transcript Request

Contact the Registrar's office to request transcripts and other academic records, or send an e-mail to: transcripts@baker.edu.

You can also request and receive transcripts online. Transcripts sent online are fully secure and FERPA compliant. Our PCI Certification and independent third-party testing ensure that security is never in question.

Choose one of the following to request an official transcript online and track it in process:

Please note:

Baker College will be closed from December 24 – 28, 2014, for the Christmas holiday. Requests received on those days will be processed on Monday, December 29.

Baker College will be closed from January 1 – 4, 2015, for the New Year’s holiday. Requests received on those days will be processed on Monday, January 5.

There is a nominal fee associated with our online transcript process. Please have a debit or credit card available.

 

A hold on your Baker College account will not prevent you from requesting a transcript through Parchment Exchange. However, Baker College will not be able to release your transcript until the hold is resolved.

Grades

Grades are computed at the end of each course. You may access final grades through the Student Online Links to Academic Records (SOLAR) System.

Baker College no longer prints or mails final grade reports. 

Your final grade report will list your:

  • Courses
  • Grade for each course
  • Grade Point Average (GPA) for that quarter
  • Cumulative GPA

Grades | Letter and Grade Point Value

A     =    4.0 points
A-     =      3.7 points
B+      =      3.3 points
B     =    3.0 points
B-     =    2.7 points
C+    =    2.3 points
C    =    2.0 points
C-    =    1.7 points
D+    =    1.3 points
D    =    1.0 points
D-    =    0.7 points
F    =    Failure = 0.0 points
P    =    Passed = 4.0 points 
WF    =    Withdrawal Failing = 0.0 points

GPA is not computed for the following grades:

CR    =    Credit (undergraduate - C or better, graduate - B or better.)
EL    =    Non-traditional credit
EX    =    Extended (used in selected courses to indicate progress, but failure to acquire all required competencies)
R    =    Articulation Credit
S    =    Satisfactory
T    =    Test Credit
U    =    Unsatisfactory

Hours and GPA are not computed for the following:

AU     =    Audit
I    =    Incomplete
NC     =    No Credit
PR    =    Progress (coursework extends beyond the end of the quarter)
W    =    Withdrawal
WP    =    Withdrawal Passing

To compute the Baker College cumulative GPA:

  • Calculate the honor points for each course completed (grade points multiplied by credit hours; an “A” or 4.0 grade in a four credit-hour class yields 16 honor points).
  • Add all honor points earned at Baker.
  • Divide by the total credit hours attempted for all quarters at Baker.

Incomplete Grade Policy

An instructor may agree to issue an Incomplete (I) grade for a course if all of the following conditions are met:

  • The student requests the Incomplete (I) grade before the end of the course.
  • The student has completed 80% of the total coursework and has a chance at a passing grade in the course.
  • The student is unable to complete the course requirements within the regular time frame due to significant, extenuating circumstances. Documentation may be required.
  • The student and instructor have signed a “contract” which clearly states the requirements to be completed and the due date for the completion of each requirement. The due date may not exceed the last day of the following quarter.

If the coursework is not completed by the agreed upon due date, the final course grade will be based on the work that was completed by the end of the quarter in which the course was taken.

Honors - Undergraduate

The President’s List
Students who earn a 4.0 GPA during a quarter in which 12 credit hours or more were completed will be placed on the President’s List for publication the following quarter. These students may also be invited to attend a President’s Luncheon/Dinner held in their honor.

The Full-Time Student Deans’ List
Students who earn a 3.5 to 3.99 GPA during a quarter in which 12 credit hours or more were completed will be placed on the Full-Time Student Deans’ List for publication the following quarter.

The Part-Time Student Deans’ List
Students who earn a 3.5 to 4.0 GPA during a quarter in which 4 to 11 credit hours were completed will be placed on the Part-Time Student Deans’ List for publication the following quarter.

Honors - Graduates

Graduates who achieve a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher are awarded a special distinction at graduation: 

  • 3.9 - 4.0 Summa Cum Laude
  • 3.7 - 3.899 Magna Cum Laude
  • 3.5 - 3.699 Cum Laude

Unofficial honor status for undergraduates for the spring graduation ceremony will be based on the student’s GPA at the time graduation materials are prepared. If a graduate’s status changes after the final audit, the graduate may obtain the appropriate honor cord. In addition, faculty on each campus may select an Honor Graduate—a student who has demonstrated the greatest potential for success in his/her field of study—in each of the degree disciplines.

Class Status - Undergraduate

The following schedule defines the number of credit hours that must be completed to qualify for class designations:

  • Freshman: Less than 45 credit hours completed
  • Sophmore: 45 to 89 credit hours completed
  • Junior*: 90 to 135 credit hours completed
  • Senior: 136 or more credit hours completed

*In addition to credit hours, the student must be currently enrolled in a program that constitutes the appropriate class level. For example, to be considered a junior, the student must be enrolled in a bachelor degree program and have already completed an associate degree or its equivalent.

Academic Standing - Undergraduate

Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 to graduate from any program. For students to stay off academic probation, the following GPAs must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-16 1.5
17-32 1.65
33-48 1.80
49-64 1.90
65+ 2.00

Note: The graduation requirement of a 2.0 supersedes the academic standing requirements.

Academic Standing - Graduate

Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 to graduate. A grade of “C” or better is required in all classes used to calculate hours for graduation. For students to stay off academic probation, the following GPAs must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-12 2.75
13-24 2.87
25-Graduation 3.00
Advising / Counseling

Helping you prepare for a successful career is what our advisors are trained to do. Whether you are a new or returning student, we can provide academic advising, career counseling, or personal counseling to help you explore and clarify your educational and career goals and help you decide on a career path.

To receive personal assistance, information, and resources, call or stop in at your campus Counseling and Advising office to speak with a Counselor or Advisor. We’ll work closely with you to identify the program—and career—that’s right for you.

Our office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:00 am - 6:30 pm, and Friday, 8 am - 5 pm

Personal Counseling

Assistance is available to aid students with personal and career decision making, college adjustments, and study techniques. For serious long-term, personal problems that may require ongoing treatment, referrals will be made to other trained professionals or agencies that specialize in your area of need.

All counseling sessions will be held in confidence unless the student agrees that certain information may be shared with others. The only exceptions to release information would be to report child abuse or to prevent obvious danger to yourself or others.

Stop by your campus Counseling/Advising office if you feel you would benefit from speaking with a counselor or advisor.

Disability Services

Baker College recognizes that qualified students who have been diagnosed or identified as having a learning, physical, or emotional disability are entitled to equal educational access.

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Baker College is committed to making every effort to provide reasonable, appropriate accommodations for students with diabilities.

At each campus, we have designated a Disability Services Coordinator (DSC) who works with students and faculty members to accommodate the student’s needs.

Disability Services Process

Disability services may be provided after completing the following three steps:

  • Meet with the Disability Services Coordinator.
  • Submit the Disability Services Request Form  (47 KB).
  • Submit current and comprehensive disability documentation.

To officially identify yourself as a student in need of services, contact the Disability Services Coordinator on your campus.

Forms

Guidelines for Documentation

* This document will be posted as soon as possible. Please contact your campus Disability Services Coordinator for immediate assistance.

Information provided to DSC is confidential documentation and evaluation information will not be released without the signed consent of the student.

Disability Services Coordinators Contact Information

Allen Park
Lisa Green
(313) 425-3708
lisa.green@baker.edu

Auburn Hills
Chip Evens
(248) 276-8241
chip.evans@baker.edu

Cadillac
Cindy Deemer
(231) 876-3109
cindy.deemer@baker.edu

Cass City
Karen Easterling
(989) 872-1129
karen.easterling@baker.edu

Center for Graduate Studies/Online
Dawn Prueter
(810) 766-4021
dawn.prueter@baker.edu

Clinton Township
Jeff Simms
(568) 790-9716
jeff.simms@baker.edu

Flint
Nancy Daily
(810) 766-4137
nancy.daily@baker.edu

Jackson/Coldwater
Josephine Hones
(517) 841-4523
josephine.hones@baker.edu

Muskegon
Chris Bultema
(231) 777-5237
chris.bultema@baker.edu

Owosso
Carol Boyer
(989) 729-3362
carol.boyer@baker.edu

Port Huron
Colleen Kaltz
(810) 989-2383
colleen.kaltz@baker.edu

Course Equipment & Software Requirements
Course Number Course Name Equipment/Software Required Software Available From
BUS660 The Marketing Environment Web cam with built in microphone (required)

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

CIS251 System Development Methods Microsoft Visio 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS310 Visual Basic Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS311 Advanced Visual Basic Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS351 System Modeling and Design Microsfot Visio 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS403 Systems Development Project Microsfot Project 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS421B Database Administration I Oracle 10g Personal Edition otn.oracle.com
(See Note 2)
CIS422 Databse Administration II Oracle 10g Personal Edition otn.oracle.com
(See Note 2)
CS217A C++ Programming Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS218A Object-Oriented Language with C++ Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
CS221 Introduction to Java Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS222 Programming with Java Java 2 SDK, Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router (WRT54G2) by Cisco www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS223 Java Object Oriented Programming Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS311A Java Programming Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS321 Data Structures and Algorithms I Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS322 Data Structures and Algorithms II Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and WIndows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS422A Database Programming I Oracle 10g Personal Edition www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS423 Database Programming II Oracle 10g Personal Edition www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
GRC131A Introduction to Graphics Imaging Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
(See Note 3)
GSD311 C Software Solutions Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and WIndows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
GSD321 Game Console Design Microsoft Xbox360 w/ Hard Drive  
INF112 Word Procession Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF113 Electronic Spreadsheets Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF114A Intro to Database Applications Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF121 Introduction to Windows Windows 8 Bookstore
INF141A Microsoft PowerPoint Internet Explorer Bookstore
MIS511 Management Information Systems

Web cam with built in microphone(required)

Apple iTunes-Free and QuickTime-Free (both are required)

One of the following is required based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Vision Pro only

Windows Only: M2Convert (required)

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech QuickCam 9000, or Logitech QuickCam Fusion Web cam and M2Convert Software

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

ITS341 Scripting for Network Administrators Windows PowerShell Download from Microsoft
PPM311 Project Planning Microsfot Project 2007 or greater MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
SPK201 Oral Communications

Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only.

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

SPK211 Group Dynamics Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only.

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

WEB201 Web Multimedia Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB221 Web Scripting Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB222 Internet Commerce Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB241 ActionScript Programming Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB321 Web Application Development Tools Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium or Newer - Full Install Bookstore
WEB331 Enterprise Java J2EE SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
WEB361 Web Server Administration Apache 2.0 HTTP Server www.apache.org
(See Note 2)
WEB411 Web Usuability Design Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium or Newer - Full Install Bookstore
WRI115 Workplace Communication

Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

Note 1
The MSDNAA program is a method for students to obtain Microsoft development applications. Students in courses that are eligible for the MSDNAA program will have access to MSDNAA module through the Baker College tab within Blackboard.

Note 2
Software is available for free from the site noted. There may be a registration process.

Note 3
You may purchase individual versions of the these products from another source, but you may be required to purchase other software from these packages later on in the program. We suggest that you purchase the entire studio or suite initially (available from the Bookstore), as purchasing the software individually will cost much more.

Constitution Day

On May 24, 2005, the U.S. Department of Education released a Notice of Implementation, announcing that all educational institutions receiving federal funding must provide an educational program pertaining to the United States Constitution on September 17 of each year commemorating the September 17, 1787 signing of the U.S. Constitution.

Senator Robert C. Byrd, a West Virginia Democrat and the former United States Congress unofficial Constitutional scholar, believed that American primary, secondary, and post-secondary students lacked significant knowledge regarding the United States Constitution. In December 2004, Senator Byrd offered an amendment that was passed by both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate in attempt to increase Constitutional knowledge.

We have provided several resources below to increase awareness and appreciation for Constitution Day and the United States Constitution:

 
Contact Us

At Baker, our Academic Office is designed to meet all of your academic concerns. Our counselors are trained to help you achieve your educational objectives. If you are in need of academic, career, or personal counseling we provide you with the appropriate information and resources to help achieve your academic goals.

If you are looking for transcripts or other academic records, our registrars are ready to help. They are available for consultation regarding changing your program and other course registration concerns.

(810) 985-7000
acad-ph@baker.edu

Full Program List
Full Course List
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
- -
24 Quarter Hours

Please see your academic advisor for more information.

 

 

Choose Any Elective Courses24
ABT 151
5 Quarter Hours

Covers the safety precautions in welding and cutting. Besides MIG welding, TIG, oxyacetylene, resistance spot welding, and plasma cutting are included. Students learn the processes used in body repair. 15 hours of lecture and 70 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Autobody Technician.

Corequisite(s):
ABT 106.
MIG Welding5
ACC 100
4 Quarter Hours

Required four (4) credits in accounting.

Accounting Elective4
ACC 121
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
INF 113
Fundamentals of Accounting I4
ACC 122
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of managerial accounting, including financial statement analysis, job order costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and use of other managerial decision-making tools.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121, INF 113
Fundamentals of Accounting II4
ACC 231
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the beneficial role technology plays in processing accounting information. Emphasis is placed on hands-on application utilizing QuickBooks. Specific topics studied include setting up company information, maintenance of accounts and records, journalizing and posting transactions, closing the books and creating financial statements, payroll reports, cost accounting, and inventory management.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241, INF 113
Computerized Accounting4
ACC 241
4 Quarter Hours

Completes the study of financial and managerial accounting fundamentals. Coverage includes a detail review of the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation, statement of cash flows, and detailed coverage of long-term liabilities and equity. Also, managerial topics of standard costing and activity-based costing are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 122
Accounting Concepts4
ACC 251
4 Quarter Hours

Studies all aspects of payroll operations, including personnel and payroll records, computations of wages and salaries, relevant laws and acts pertaining to payroll, preparation of payroll registers, recording of accounting entries, and preparation of payroll tax returns.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241
Payroll Accounting4
ACC 295
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students for the national bookkeeper certification exam. Topics include adjustments and error corrections, payroll, depreciation, inventory, and internal controls and fraud prevention.

Bookkeeper Certification Prep4
ACC 301
4 Quarter Hours

Begins an in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues relevant to presentation of financial information for use in external decision-making processes. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for a complex, classified balance sheet. Other topics include a review of the accounting cycle, preparation of financial statements, the conceptual framework, GAAP, and account reconciliation.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241 or ACC 291.
Intermediate Accounting I4
ACC 302
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for multi-step income statement. Other topics include reinforcement of the accounting cycle and the interrelatedness of the financial statements and how various accounts affect them.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 301
Intermediate Accounting II4
ACC 303
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the Intermediate series, this course expands on competencies gained through previous study while addressing the reporting and disclosure requirements for the Statement of Cash Flows. In addition, pensions and other unique transactions, events, and disclosures will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 302
Intermediate Accounting III4
ACC 312B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides in-depth coverage of fundamentals of federal taxation related to business entities, including C and S corporations and partnerships. Emphasis is placed on the application of tax laws to the preparation of federal tax and informational return for these entities.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121
Business Entities Taxation4
ACC 331A
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes costs for decision making, capital investment decisions, quantitative models for planning and control, and performance evaluation. Strategic control systems, using accounting data for internal decision making, and cost control are also emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241
Cost Accounting4
ACC 341B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of federal and state taxation related to individuals. Students will examine the federal tax system; research and apply tax law; and calculate gross income, deductions, and future tax liability. Tax planning for the individual will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121
Individual Taxation4
ACC 416
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the discipline of auditing, accounting systems, and internal controls in public and private sectors, as well as the auditing profession and the audit process. Topics covered will include audit reports, professional ethics, legal liability, responsibilities, audit evidence, and planning. Internal controls and risks are also introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 303
Auditing, Systems, and Controls I4
ACC 417
4 Quarter Hours

Applies the audit process to various transaction cycles. This course introduces the systems of controls and related analytic flow charting for each of the transaction cycles, as well as the test of controls and the substantive tests for each cycle. This course is a continuation of Auditing, Systems, and Controls I.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 416
Auditing, Systems, and Controls II4
ACC 431B
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the fundamental principles of accounting for governmental units, colleges, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will compare and contrast non-profit accounting processes with those of for-profit enterprises by evaluating the differing regulations for recording transactions, financial reporting, and revenue recognition as well as funding options and budgeting.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 302
Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting4
ACC 441
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform accounting functions related to the acquisition of a business, consolidated financial statements, and disclosure requirements for industry segments.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 303
Advanced Accounting4
ADP 101
4 Quarter Hours

Explores advanced aspects of Microsoft Word. Students will become proficient in various Microsoft Word tools, including: insert features, page layout, references and reports, and mailings.

Prerequisite(s):
INF 112
Workplace Technology I4
ADP 102
4 Quarter Hours

Explores how to increase productivity by using various Microsoft office tools to support administrative professional work. Students will become proficient in advanced aspects of Microsoft Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and Publisher. Introduces cloud-based storage and tools for communicating virtually.

Prerequisite(s):
ADP 101, INF 113
INF 141A
Workplace Technology II4
ADP 141
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication and conduct in the workplace. Students will be required to join a professional organization, and will practice working in teams and interacting with board members and superiors. Explores managing and marketing oneself in the virtual environment.

Corequisite(s):
ENG 101
Workplace Professionalism4
ADP 151
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the skills necessary to manage multiple projects in the work setting, with a focus on time management, trouble-shooting, and teamwork. Students will practice using calendar and organizational tools and will practice budgeting meetings and events. This course will also explore project management in the virtual environment.

Prerequisite(s):
ADP 101, MTH 108
Workplace Management I4
ADP 203
4 Quarter Hours

Explores various forms of hardware, software, applications, and cloud-based communication and storage pertinent to administrative professional work.  Students will practice using various technologies and tools to become more efficient in the workplace.  Learn how to use these tools to excel in a virtual environment.

Prerequisite(s):
ADP 102
Workplace Technology III4
ADP 221
4 Quarter Hours

Explores how to communicate more effectively in an office environment. Emphasis is placed on communication in ethical and customer service related situations. Students will become proficient in business writing and in using various forms of communication. Explores how and when to use communication tools and technology.

Corequisite(s):
ENG 101
Business Communication4
ADP 252
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the steps to plan, execute, and reflect on a meeting or workplace event. Students will practice planning meetings and events and will explore how to do so virtually. Students will become proficient in budgeting and records management.

Prerequisite(s):
ADP 101, MTH 108
Corequisite(s):
ACC 122
Workplace Management II4
AG 221
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the maintenance of gas and diesel engines, field machinery, tractor and power units, and shop equipment to include the fundamentals of gas and arc welding. Students will be exposed to the common implements and equipment used in the agriculture industry. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113, MTH 108
Agriculture Equipment and Tooling4
AIT 311
4 Quarter Hours

Helps participants become more reflective and effective teachers.

Teaching and Learning4
AIT 321
4 Quarter Hours

Helps participants develop a better understanding of learning in adulthood.

The Adult Learner4
AIT 411
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes theory of instruction, methods, and materials/resources necessary in the subject area.

Instructional Strategies and Delivery4
AIT 421
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on techniques that lead to development of a positive, democratic learning environment.

Classroom/Instructional Management4
AIT 431
4 Quarter Hours

Compares different types of assessments and analyzes assessment results for the purpose of improving student learning. Students will compare classroom assessment techniques to program assessments and incorporate results into program evaluation and accreditation. The instruction in the course will emphasize creating valid assessments and using assessment data for decision making.

Assessment for Student Learning4
AIT 491
4 Quarter Hours

Provides hands-on capstone experience in teaching or training setting. Students will practice teaching and will reflect on the teaching-learning process. Continuous improvement of instructional skills will be emphasized, while incorporating adult learning theory, classroom management, curriculum and assessment.

Adult Instructor and Trainer Practicum4
AST 102
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on an introduction to engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Computerized engine controls are reviewed as are ignition systems, fuel/air systems, and exhaust systems. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Performance I6
AST 103
6 Quarter Hours

Continues the examination of engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Emission controls, effects of ignition timing, analysis of exhaust gases, and advanced engine services are studied. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 102.
Engine Performance II6
AST 122
4 Quarter Hours

Continues coverage of engine failure analysis with a focus on diagnostic procedures. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of labs are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Repair II4
AST 211
4 Quarter Hours

Presents an overview of basic Hybrid theory and applications within an automobile. Topics covered but not limited to, introduction to Hybrid vehicles, Hybrid safety, Hybrid battery design and application, battery operated electric vehicles, mild and assist Hybrid technologies, full Hybrid applications and alternative fuel overview. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B. AST 113.
Introduction to Hybrid Vehicles4
AST 221A
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the design and operation of automotive brake systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair, to manufacturer specifications, of traditional and Anti Lock Brake Systems (ABS) as well as Traction Control Systems (TCS). Lab demonstrations and on-car repair provide a working knowledge of hydraulic systems, disc/drum machining, rebuilding, and power assist, as well as scan tool usage to repair ABS/TCS systems. 20 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106 , C or better in AST 111A .
Automotive Brake Service6
AST 231A
6 Quarter Hours

Examines front and rear drive vehicles and the suspension and drive system for each. Steering mechanisms and suspension components for both automatic and manual drives are discussed as are alignment techniques. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A.
Automotive Suspension/Steering6
AST 241A
6 Quarter Hours

Covers automotive heating and air conditioning system theories, troubleshooting, and servicing. Proper refrigerant recovery, recycling, storage, and use of recharging equipment will also be covered. Students will be made aware of recent environmental concerns relevant to coolant and refrigeration. In addition, basic shop safety and safe use of recycling equipment will be discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A.
Heating/Air Conditioning6
AST 251
8 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the front-wheel drive transaxle and components. Transaxle fundamentals and operation will be reviewed as well as common faults and servicing procedures. 40 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 101 or C or better in AST 121.
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle8
AST 261
6 Quarter Hours

Investigates the manual drive train and major components. Transmissions, drive shafts, differentials, and drive axles are examined. Diagnosis and troubleshooting are discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B, C or better in AST 121.
Manual Drive Train and Axles6
BPA 111
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic principles of baking. Through hands-on experience students learn the identification of bakery tools and equipment, proper weighing and scaling of ingredients, and basic mixing methods. Students will learn to prepare basic breads, doughs, and starters along with choux products and pies. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 100, C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Baking Techniques I6
BPA 112
6 Quarter Hours

Continues from BPA 111 and focuses on the production and theory of baked goods such as flat breads, hard crusted breads, laminated doughs, puff pastry and specialty breads in a lab and lecture format. This course continues a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 111
Baking Techniques II6
BPA 121
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic techniques used in general baking and plated dessert production. Through extensive hands-on labs, students will focus on the preparations involved with yeast-leavened products, quick breads, American pies, cake batters, mousses, fillings, meringues, buttercreams, and Bavarian creams. Students will also focus on assembly and decoration of European cakes, basic glazing and icing techniques, syrup preparation, and classic and contemporary plated dessert applications. Students will be introduced to recipe and formula modification to create more beneficial baked goods and desserts. The concept of baker's percentage and proper selection of equipment and utensils for specific applications will be reinforced.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 100, C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Baking for Culinary Students6
BPA 151
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic techniques used in pastry production. Through extensive hands-on labs, students will focus on the preparations involved with cake batters, foams, mousses, fillings, meringues, buttercreams, and Bavarian creams. Students will also focus on assembly and decoration of European cakes, basic glazing and icing techniques, syrup preparation and shortdough applications.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 112
Pastry Techniques I6
BPA 152
6 Quarter Hours

Provides a focused, hands-on, comprehensive study of the techniques used in the production of International pastries, contemporary cakes, and restaurant cakes. Students will also utilize techniques in the design and layout of Charlottes and preparation of entremets and bombes.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 151
Pastry Techniques II6
BPA 153
6 Quarter Hours

Expands on the concepts and skills from Pastry Techniques II, with a continuation of techniques used for further applications. Students will focus on the design and assembly of wedding cakes, showpiece cakes and special occasion cakes as well as the building methods and techniques used for showpiece cakes. Students will be introduced to the advanced skills used in sugar work, rolled, colored and formed gum paste, fondant and modeling chocolate pastes.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 152
Pastry Techniques III6
BPA 221
6 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth introduction into the production of various pastries. Students focus on the skills and knowledge needed to produce tarts, petit fours, tea pastries, mignardise, molded mousses, napoleons, cream horns, Baklava and other pastries for sweet tables.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 251 or BPA 251A.
Advanced Confectionary Arts I6
BPA 222
6 Quarter Hours

Provides students the hands-on experience in the production and preparation of jellies, candies, cordials, crystallized fruits, sugared nuts, ganaches and other confectionary fillings for bonbons and truffles. Students will learn proper chocolate tempering techniques, confectionary mold preparation, cocoa butter painting and spraying.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 221
Advanced Confectionary Arts II6
BPA 223
6 Quarter Hours

Examines advanced confectionary production skills in the design and building of chocolate showpieces. Students will also utilize the techniques used in blown, pulled, and poured sugar showpieces and decorations, packed sugar and pastillage décor. The culmination of student knowledge will be exhibited with the design, fabrication and assembly of competition chocolate and sugar centerpieces.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 222
Advanced Confectionary Arts III6
BPA 251A
6 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes preparing students in a working production environment. Students will focus on plated desserts for restaurant and banquet work, hot and cold desserts, trios, deconstructed desserts, samplers and ice creams. Students will develop proper plating and service selections, color, texture, height and focal point balance. Plate presentations of simple and complex desserts will be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 151, BPA 152
Cafe and Restaurant Production6
BUS 211
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the data analysis process and the role of business decision making.  Explores qualitative and quantitative data, data vs. information, data research, relevance, validity, business intelligence tools, ethical and legal implications of data analysis, data integrity, primary and secondary data, MAIP (Measurement Analysis, Interpretation Presentation) and ethical and legal implications of data analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
Bachelor of Digital Media Technology majors: ENG 101, MKT 111B, MTH 111. Bachelor of Information Systems majors: ENG 101, MGT 101, MTH 108. All other majors: ENG 101, MGT 101, MKT 111B, MTH 108
Business Analytics4
BUS 401
6 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the firm as it expands globally. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and utilization of diversity and ethics in the development, operation and international expansion of the firm. Multicultural work environments, employment and labor issues, domestic and international law, global marketing, trade and finance will be examined. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree programs.

Prerequisite(s):
24 Credits Hours in REQUIRED COURSES, Junior status.
International Business6
BUS 421
6 Quarter Hours

Covers the role of the marketing function in organizational operations with an emphasis on product/service promotion, placement, and pricing. Various marketing strategies will be evaluated. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree program.

Marketing Management6
BUS 431
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the strategy function of senior management and the establishment of the organizational mission, strategy, goals, objectives and plan of implementation and evaluation. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree program.

Management Strategy6
BUS 571
4 Quarter Hours

Examines financial rewards in organizations. Students will examine compensation, surveys, reward and incentive systems, pay equity, benefits, legal issues, and the strategic planning of compensation and reward systems in organizations.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 572
Compensation and Benefits4
BUS 572
4 Quarter Hours

Evaluates a variety of human resource issues facing corporations and businesses today. These include employee development, performance appraisal systems, job design, hiring and dismissal processes, career management strategies, legal issues, morale monitoring, domestic and global labor market problems, as well as how cultural and economic factors influence the effectiveness of human resource management.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Human Resource Management4
BUS 573A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the opportunity to analyze industrial relations by examining the role of labor unions in American life and worldwide. The course will address the legal and business environment for collective bargaining and conflict resolution among both union and at-will employees. It will also address the impact of globalization and international trade agreements on the future growth of organized labor.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 572
Labor Relations and Conflict Resolution4
BUS 574A
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the role and purpose that organizational development plays in creating and supporting business strategy, including change, culture, values, and environment. Evaluation of the results from organizational development initiatives will be discussed to determine contributions made and lessons learned. This course is designed to improve the knowledge and skills of persons involved in the process of business change.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 572
Strategic Organizational Development4
BUS 576A
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on determining an organization's training needs. Emphasis will be placed on training needs analysis techniques, designing training programs, implementation of training programs, evaluation of training programs, and the cost effectiveness of training programs.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 572
Employee Staffing and Development4
BUS 615
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an understanding of individuals, groups, and organizations as a whole. This course considers such topics as alignment of people within an organization, as well as techniques for these individuals to manage and lead more effectively. This course will also discuss how technology, the Internet, globalism, and virtual teaming are impacting the work environment today.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Human Behavior Management of Organizations4
BUS 630
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the use of financial and managerial accounting information for decision-making purposes. Topics include accounting concepts, accounting systems, preparing financial statements, product costing and overhead allocation, variance analysis, budgeting, and responsibility accounting. How these topics should be applied in information based decision making is emphasized. Case analysis is used to enhance student learning of key accounting concepts.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Accounting for the Contemporary Manager4
BUS 631
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on special studies related to tax problems of individuals, partnerships, fiduciaries, and corporations. Emphasis is on federal taxation of corporations, trusts, and estates. Specific use of the Tax Code and the Internal Revenue Service Regulations will be an integral part of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 630 and 16 hours of undergraduate accounting
Taxation4
BUS 634
4 Quarter Hours

Studies, comprehensively, the recording of transactions by government units and the preparation of financial statements by not-for-profit entities. City government is the basic unit of study; however, school districts, universities, and hospitals are covered to illustrate the similarity in accounting for all not-for-profit entities. The topics of the classifications of audits, auditing standards, audit procedures, the audit report, the Single Audit Act, fraud examination, and forensic accounting are also covered.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 630 and 16 hours of undergraduate accounting
Non-Profit Accounting4
BUS 635
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the impact of the cultural, social, legal, political, and economic conditions that shape the national accounting standard-setting process of the different countries with a focus on accounting practices of vital countries with diverse cultures and legal environments. The purposes of and attempts at classification of countries by their accounting characteristics are examined. The purposes and progress of regional and international harmonization programs are discussed with a focus on the international accounting standards and their impact on the economic consequences of multinational corporations. Attention is given to the accounting problems facing multinational corporations using case studies. These include foreign currency translation, auditing in the international environment, transfer pricing, international taxation, global managerial planning and control and analyzing foreign financial statements.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 630 and 16 hours of undergraduate accounting
Global Accounting4
BUS 640
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an understanding of corporate financial management including the introduction of key concepts in the field of finance and the environment in which they are applied. Students learn how to gauge the financial health of their company and to measure and understand the financial return in relation to risk. Capital budgeting and management of working capital are also discussed. This course emphasizes teaching students to improve their business financial decision making.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
The Financial Environment4
BUS 641
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the opportunity to learn and discuss the topics of money, money markets, money market participants, monetary policies and its effects, and regulation of money markets, in addition to examining banks, banking services, and the banking industry. The dynamic nature of the banking industry will be examined, highlighting recent changes and expected future developments. Students will also learn to identify and manage financial risks. Students will write a project report on how to improve some banking practices or business practices related to banking or money management.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 640
Money and Banking4
BUS 642
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasis is on understanding and preparing financial accounting statements on past performance and projected future performance of organizations. Students will also learn to evaluate and efficiently use financial accounting statements to identify business problems and profit from business strengths. Topics include FASB's conceptual framework, GAAP, measuring income, recording transactions, accounting for sales, inventories and cost of goods sold, long-lived assets and depreciation, liabilities and interest, valuation and accounting for bonds and leases, stockholder's equity, statement of cash flows, accounting differences, and the International Accounting Standards.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 630 or C or better in BUS 640, 16 hours of undergraduate accounting
Financial Accounting4
BUS 643
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students international financial capital flows in the global economy, focusing on how firms can borrow from, lend to, and invest in foreign countries. The costs and benefits of international business financing are analyzed, from both short-term and long-term perspectives, considering both direct and indirect effects. Business strategies for managing financial risks are examined, including foreign exchange risk, interest rate risk, and default risk. Students will complete a project report on how his or her firm can profitably borrow from, lend to, or invest in a particular foreign country, using the international money market and international capital market.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 640
International Business Finance4
BUS 645
4 Quarter Hours

Helps students to understand and undertake responsible budgeting practices at various levels of government - local, state, and national. Students will learn to read and develop a budget of tax revenue income, expenditures, and transfers to achieve policy makers' financial objectives for their constituents. This course explores the issues of tax policy, fiscal policy, transfer programs, budget deficits, public debt, and budget planning. Students will prepare a project report using the principles of public finance to improve a government practice.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 640
Public Finance4
BUS 650
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an integrated understanding of the concepts of economics. The emphasis is on the application of economics and uses actual economic events to encourage the study of the principles of economics and to show how these concepts can help students understand the complex and dynamic American economy.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
The Economic Environment4
BUS 660
4 Quarter Hours

Concentrates on the marketing concept and its impact on the strategic decision-making process of the firm. This course emphasizes planning and managing marketing activities of multi-product firms and provides an understanding of the fundamental issues which influence marketing decisions. The specifics of implementing a marketing plan are discussed. In addition, the effects of the global marketplace and sources of marketing research are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
The Marketing Environment4
BUS 664
4 Quarter Hours

Gives an overview and provides an understanding of international marketing as a managerial challenge. The emphasis is on international environmental analysis, international marketing strategies and current international market issues and their implications. It is an integrative learning experience bringing in all the many facets of business management to bear on the central concern of most organizations today - how to grow and prosper in a global marketplace. Challenges in global market integration, global trade and global investments are also explored and examined.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 660
International Marketing4
BUS 666
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an acute analysis of the goals, methodology, and techniques of research for marketing decisions. This course concentrates on the generation of research information necessary for decision making in all aspects of marketing functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 660
Marketing Research4
BUS 667
4 Quarter Hours

Studies conceiving, executing, and administering all aspects of the promotional mix. The above analysis includes the processes for implementation and evaluation of a promotional strategic plan specific to product(s) being marketed. Topics include: formulation of a promotional budget, selecting media sources, determining promotional objectives, and evaluating the effectiveness of the plan.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 660
Promotional Management4
BUS 668
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth study of variables that influence all the logistic elements for determination of the places where products are being sold. Topics include government regulations, distribution, transportation, organizational structure, competition, and buyer behavior. A logistics model/plan is required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 660
Distribution Management4
BUS 678
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the use of data collection and analysis in business environments to facilitate decision making. Research designs will be addressed so that students can ask and answer specific questions. Students will learn to properly use basic descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will offer an applications-oriented perspective to conducting and critically evaluating primary research.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CGS 501
Research and Statistics for Managers4
BUS 685
4 Quarter Hours

Examines issues within the leadership area including the following: managing cultural diversity, team building, project management, roles and responsibilities of the leader, leadership theories, the leadership/follower relationship, supervisory techniques, stress management, problem solving, and various concepts related to human behavior. This course also examines the evolution of leadership thought, the various methods for improving the worker performance through analytical decision making, and current issues in leadership

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 615
Dynamics of Leadership4
BUS 686
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an applied and comprehensive view of the leadership experience in today's world. This course integrates recent ideas and applications with established scholarly research. The implications and demands on leaders due to ethical scandals, global crises, emergence of e-commerce, learning organizations, virtual teams, and globalization are examined.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 615
Leadership Theory and Practice4
BUS 688
4 Quarter Hours

Explores leadership styles through leader biographies covering several management eras. Both domestic and global views of leadership are considered. Leadership practices and philosophies of both past and present leaders are examined and critiqued.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 615
Profiles in Leadership4
BUS 689
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on ways to improve small group performance through assessment and outcome-based goal setting techniques. Students examine organizational teams and learn team-building skills while being members of virtual teams. Students also learn to productively function in a group environment. Team performance is considered, and various reasons for team failure are explored. Team leadership is stressed throughout the course, and problems that may occur within teams are addressed. Effective teams are critical for many organizations to move forward, and this course helps students enhance their team-building skills.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 615
Team Leadership and Group Dynamics4
BUS 690
4 Quarter Hours

Integrates the theories, skills, and knowledge gained from previous courses and provides students the opportunity to make strategic business decisions. Students will analyze the strategies of current public corporations. Students will also complete a decision-making business simulation. This is the capstone course of the Baker College MBA program.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Corequisite(s):
BUS 572, BUS 615, BUS 630, BUS 650, BUS 660, BUS 675 or BUS 755 or MIS 511, BUS 640 or BUS 759
Strategy in a Global Environment4
BUS 750
4 Quarter Hours

Examines various healthcare policies and the related impact on diverse populations. Students will analyze population health and status assessment information and develop appropriate healthcare program recommendations. Major future trends, such as major causes of disease, expanding role of hospice, and the role of preventative medicine and wellness programs, will be investigated.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Healthcare Programs and Policies4
BUS 752
4 Quarter Hours

Studies, comprehensively, managerial problem-solving and decision-making techniques, organizational design, human resources management, the healthcare system, quality improvement, organizational change, and strategic planning.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Healthcare Administration4
BUS 753
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a thorough review of accreditation requirements and the Malcolm Baldrige Quality standards for healthcare organizations. Each of the seven healthcare criteria for performance will be explored: leadership, strategic planning, customer focus, measurement/analysis/knowledge management, workforce focus, operations focus, and results. Case studies and self-assessments will allow for practical application of these criteria.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Quality Management in Healthcare Organizations4
BUS 755
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth study of information technology as it is utilized in healthcare organizations. Students will compare and contrast the tools, processes, and strategies available to manage information, data, and software and hardware in healthcare organizations. Practical application will be emphasized and students will analyze the impact of information systems and technology on a business and demonstrate the ability to make effective information management decisions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Information Technology Management in Healthcare Organizations4
BUS 758
4 Quarter Hours

Explores various legal and ethical issues relevant to the healthcare field. Topics include medical malpractice, informed consent, professional liability, patients' rights, employee rights and responsibilities, and medical ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Health Law and Ethics4
BUS 759
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a deeper understanding of financial concepts applied to the healthcare field. Topics include financial statement analysis, principles of reimbursement, cost concepts and decision making, financial forecasting, budgeting techniques, capital project analysis, and strategic financial planning within the healthcare industry.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Healthcare Finance4
BUS 800
2 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the need in proficiency at identifying the need for information, finding it, and evaluating its accuracy, significance, and relevance to research. Students will be introduced to the information resources available as a doctoral student at Baker College and will develop proficiency at using them. Library services such as remote access to resources, supply materials, and search strategies are explored. Students will also become familiar with the My eLibrary module available in each doctoral seminar.

Doctoral Seminar in Information Proficiency2
BUS 801
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the connection that exists between the role of learner and practitioner. At the heart of the DBA program is the belief that ideas will improve professional practices and reflection on professional practices to create new ideas. These relationships are explored in this course. Students will use readings, assessment tools, experiential exercises, and reflection on past and current experiences to develop a deeper understanding of the extent of knowledge of business and management, learning styles and skills, and professional strengths and weaknesses. Students will also explore the nature of scholarly inquiry and scientific method as well as explore connections between theory and practice and the importance of these considerations in doing applied research. This course also provides practical guidance on how to critically read scholarly articles, how to formulate researchable questions, and how to ensure scholarly integrity and avoid plagiarism.

The Scholar Practitioner4
BUS 810
4 Quarter Hours

Explores today's complex, world-wide environment that necessitates teamwork and collaboration to sustain a competitive advantage. Students will examine practices required to lead organizations with highly diverse workforces distributed across international, cultural, and regional boundaries. Students will systematically investigate the latest ideas emerging from both the world of practice and leadership research to identify "best practices" in the ever changing and dynamic workplace of the 21st Century.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Leading 21st Century Organizations4
BUS 811
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses how regardless of whether you work in a large or small company, a governmental agency, a nonprofit or community-based organization, or run your own small business, you must function in a new and highly interconnected world-wide context. This course explores this new environment from multiple perspectives. Students will examine cultural, environmental, ethical, political, and legal differences across different regions of the world. Attention is focused on how to manage and lead across boundaries to meet the challenges of this new context. Theories of international management, international human resource management, and international finance and accounting are considered as is the role of information technology in creating greater access to the world-wide economy.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Managing in a World-Wide Context4
BUS 812
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses how the digital age has created new opportunities and new challenges for the business enterprise. In this course, students will explore the strategic importance of knowledge and information systems. Students will examine the emerging field of knowledge management and how it addresses the demands of global competition and the needs of 21st century organizations. Students will learn how knowledge is developed, collected, organized, stored, retrieved, disseminated, and applied across organizations; and how information systems are used to make evidence based decisions as well as examine theories and research drawn from organizational behavior, information sciences, and management to create an interdisciplinary perspective on these critical organizational processes.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Knowledge Management and Information Systems4
BUS 813
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses how understanding system variation and establishing clear metrics are essential to ensure successful change initiatives. In this course, students will examine total quality, ISO 9000, Malcolm Baldrige, process re-engineering, benchmarking, Six Sigma, lean development, and other techniques for quality improvement, and will examine these initiatives in the broader framework of organizational change.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Quality Improvement and Organizational Change4
BUS 814
4 Quarter Hours

Reviews how socially responsible and innovative corporate governance is required to meet the challenges of global warming, the stewardship of scarce resources, and the distribution of income among various stakeholders. Students will examine how ethical principles can be integrated into corporate strategies. The responsibility to a wide array of stakeholders is examined as well as factors that should be considered in guiding a company's philanthropic, community development and sustainable business practices. Students will also focus on individual ethics and how managers and leaders can build congruency between their values and actions. Finally, students will examine best practices in corporate social innovation by such firms as Ben and Jerry's, KLD, Plug Power, PwC, UN Global Compact, and Schlumberger SEED.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Corporate and Personal Ethics4
BUS 840
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the concepts of statistical analysis with application to the functional areas of business. It is rich in applications from accounting, finance, marketing, management, and economics. This course will also serve as a refresher on the basic concepts and statistical techniques used in business and prepare the student for more advanced quantitative methods introduced later in the program, laying a foundation for analytic literacy.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Statistics for Executives4
BUS 841
4 Quarter Hours

Gives students the opportunity to learn the purpose and rationale for conducting scientific research, critical technology used in research, and the basic elements of research design. Elements covered include measurement, sampling, variables, validity, reliability, and causation. Different research designs will be covered including experimental and quasi-experimental, survey, field, designs utilizing existing data, and evaluation research. Ethics involved in research are covered including the protection of human subjects as required by the Baker College Institutional Review Board (IRB). It is recommended that the course be taken before or concurrently with BUS844.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Introduction to Research Design4
BUS 842
4 Quarter Hours

Explores, in greater depth, the theory behind and the execution of qualitative research studies. Students will formulate qualitative research questions related to a research problem, identify applicable qualitative approaches, and participant selection strategies. Students will develop protocols for interviews, observations, and document analysis as well as learn to organize and analyze data through classification and coding. Students will examine specific methodological and ethical issues associated with qualitative research. The important outcome is that students will have the research design for their dissertations based on a survey of the research design literature appropriate for their study.

Designing a Qualitative Dissertation Study4
BUS 843
4 Quarter Hours

Helps students develop an in-depth understanding and working knowledge of quantitative research design. This course will build on statistical techniques (descriptive and inferential) learned in BUS840, learning to design studies in such a way as to maximize the validity and reliability of the outcome. This course approaches quantitative research design from a problem-solving perspective with emphasis placed on selecting appropriate research designs and on interpreting and reporting data analyses results. Design of experiments to enhance the use and interpretation of statistics in research is the primary focus of the course. The important outcome is that students will have the research design for their dissertations based on a survey of the research design literature appropriate for their study.

Designing a Quantitative Dissertation Study4
BUS 844
4 Quarter Hours

Defines the purpose of dissertation studies; produces a clear statement of the research problem based on a detailed review of the literature, and produces research questions to be answered or hypotheses to be tested. Students will include these in a dissertation prospectus, which can be used to select members for their dissertation committee.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 841, BUS 892
Defining the Dissertation Research Problem and Research Question4
BUS 860
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the first of two seminars in the successful completion of a qualifying Paper, which is Chapter I and Chapter II of the dissertation proposal. In this initial doctoral seminar, students will complete Chapter I Introduction and Statement of Problem. Specifically, the student will investigate a topic of their choice within their selected field of study. Chapter I includes a definition of the research problem, identification of the research questions, a description of the purpose of the study, and an explanation about its significance. A brief summary of the literature review as well as a description of the research methodology, identification of relevant terminology, and limitations will be included. The seminar will include the development of a bibliography of major theorists or theories in the field of study.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 844
Doctoral Specialization Seminar I4
BUS 870
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the completion of Chapter II or Literature Review. Specifically, the student will expound on their research problem by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting major theories relevant to their chosen topic. The student will synthesize these concepts to develop a literature review, which provides a connection between the research problem and the research questions. The student's Qualifying Paper is completed in this seminar.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 860
Doctoral Specialization Seminar II4
BUS 880
2 Quarter Hours

Requires students to attend at least one professional conference in the first year. The Academy of Management annual meeting is an example. Approved conferences will be identified and program faculty will also attend. The DBA program will host a seminar at these events. A list of approved conferences will be developed by the faculty each year. Students will be required to document attendance and write a short paper describing what was learned at the conference.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
First Year Professional Residency2
BUS 881
2 Quarter Hours

Requires students to attend at least one professional conference in the second year. The Academy of Management annual meeting is an example. Approved conferences will be identified and program faculty will also attend. The DBA program will host a seminar at these events. A list of approved conferences will be developed by the faculty each year. Students will be required to document attendance and write a short paper describing what was learned at the conference.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 880
Second Year Professional Residency2
BUS 890A
2 Quarter Hours

Requires students, in preparation for the Comprehensive Essay and the first year assessment, to develop and maintain a reading asset library of annotations, to explore possible topics for their dissertation through the presentation of cases, and to engage in scholarly dialogue with colleagues.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 800, BUS 801
Professional Development I2
BUS 891A
2 Quarter Hours

Requires students, in preparation for the Comprehensive Essay and the first year assessment, to develop and maintain a reading asset library of annotations, to explore possible topics for their dissertation through the presentation of cases, and to engage in scholarly dialogue with colleagues.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 890A
Professional Development II2
BUS 892
2 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to complete the Comprehensive Essay at the end of the first year after the completion of BUS801, BUS810, BUS811, BUS813, BUS890, and BUS891. It provides evidence that the student has mastered foundational theories and concepts in the field of business administration, have an interdisciplinary understanding of the complex nature of business problems, and is able to synthesize and analyze scholarly research publications. The essay requires students to summarize the annotations collected in the Reading Asset Library. The annotations are submitted with the essay.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 810, BUS 813, BUS 891A
Comprehensive Essay2
BUS 893
2 Quarter Hours

Allows students to prepare a scholarly paper suitable for publication, in order to qualify for the dissertation phase of the DBA program. Normally this occurs at the end of the second year after all your coursework in the program has been completed except for BUS814 Corporate and Personal Ethics and all that remains is the dissertation. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate mastery of scholarly writing, research methodology, and a depth of knowledge in a field covered by the program. It will provide evidence that the student is able to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, and be able to communicate management and business theories, research findings, and best practices through scholarly publication.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 870
Qualifying Paper2
BUS 894
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to work toward the completion of their dissertation proposal with the support of their chair and committee. The final dissertation is composed of five chapters (Chapter I Introduction and Statement of the Problem; Chapter II Literature Review; Chapter III Methodology; Chapter IV Results; and Chapter V. Conclusions and Recommendations). The proposal is composed of the first three chapters and must be approved before data can be collected and analyzed.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 870
Dissertation Proposal I4
BUS 895
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to complete their dissertation proposal with the support of their chair and committee. The final dissertation is composed of five chapters (Chapter I Introduction and Statement of the Problem; Chapter II Literature Review; Chapter III Methodology; Chapter IV Results; and Chapter V. Conclusions and Recommendations). The proposal is composed of the first three chapters and must be approved before data can be collected and analyzed. The proposal oral must be successfully completed to pass the course.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 893, BUS 894
Dissertation Proposal II4
BUS 896B
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 895
Dissertation I4
BUS 897B
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to continue working toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 896B
Dissertation II4
BUS 898B
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to continue working toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 897B
Dissertation III4
BUS 899B
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to successfully complete their dissertation oral with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice. The dissertation oral must be successfully completed to pass the course.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 898B
Dissertation IV4
BUS 900
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the successful completion of the students' dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that the student has the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, has mastered foundational theories and concepts, and has an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that the student is able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice. The dissertation must be successfully completed and submitted to UMI to pass the course.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 899B
Dissertation V4
CE 321
4 Quarter Hours

Covers design of concrete and steel bridges in accordance with the latest AASHTO specifications; understanding of theoretical background behind the codes such as risk and reliability concepts; load rating of bridges, and hands-on bridge design using computer software and hand calculations.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Design of Bridges4
CE 325
4 Quarter Hours

Describes principles of design and practice for rural and urban highway facilities and airport installations; design criteria and controls, capacity analysis, cross-section selection, design of horizontal and vertical alignment, intersections, interchanges and computer applications to design problems.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Geometric Design of Highways and Airports4
CE 351
4 Quarter Hours

Covers the analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete structural elements; full and partial pre-stressing; service ability and strength requirements; code criteria for bridges, buildings, and other structures.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Pre-Stressed Concrete Design4
CE 355
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses basic principles of mechanics, elasticity, and failure as applied to wood; design methods and specifications governing the design of sawn lumber, plywood, and glulam timber structures and structural components.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Structural Timber Design4
CE 358
4 Quarter Hours

Covers flexible and rigid pavement design procedures; subgrade, base, and surfacing characteristics; loads; stresses in pavement systems; material characterization; pavement response models; pavement performance models; structural design systems; effects of natural, forces; and construction practices. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Pavement Design4
CE 371
4 Quarter Hours

Presents fundamentals of geotechnics applied to design and analysis of shallow foundations, excavations, retaining structures, and slopes; selected topics on soil improvement and vibration; emphasis on computer utilization.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Geotechnical Engineering4
CE 385
4 Quarter Hours

Covers history, economics, and traffic characteristics of transportation systems; planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of air, highway, pipeline, rail, and water transportation facilities-vehicles, guide-ways, and terminals.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Transportation Engineering4
CE 415
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water movement from arrival on land surface until it reaches the sea overland; concept of frequency, maximum probable runoff of rainfall, mass curves, and other statistical methods of hydrologic engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341
Hydrology4
CE 421
4 Quarter Hours

Presents steady and unsteady flow in pipelines and pipe networks; analysis of fluid flow in open channel systems; design of pipelines, drainage facilities, and water supply networks.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341
Hydraulics4
CE 431
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water quality criteria, water treatment processes: physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes, sludge processing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Water Treatment Principles4
CE 435
4 Quarter Hours

Presents water processing and distribution, wastewater collection systems - management, operation and maintenance, advanced wastewater treatment processes, water reuse, design of sanitary sewers.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Wastewater Collection Systems4
CE 438
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses environmental laws and regulations; solid waste sources, composition and characteristics; properties of municipal solid waste, processing technologies, storage, transportation and disposal, management of landfills, materials recovery and recycling.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Solid Waste Principles4
CGS 501
1 Quarter Hours

Orients graduate students to the standards and expectations of the College, including topics such as policies and procedures, the online learning environment and expectations, academic integrity, APA writing requirements, library resources, and professional standards.

Graduate Seminar1
CIS 106B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to computer operating systems and maintenance concepts. Students will study the Microsoft Windows family of operating systems and will receive a brief introduction to Linux. This course will assist students in their preparation for the CompTIA A+ Essentials Exam.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam, INF 121 or NET 101.
Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I4
CIS 107B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a continuation of the study of computer operating systems and maintenance concepts with a focus on practical application and troubleshooting. This course will assist students in their preparation for the CompTIA A+ Practical Application exam.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 106B
Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance II4
CIS 114
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the underlying principles of information and database structure in electronic database management systems. Students will be introduced to types of information, table structure, features of a relational database, basic concepts of database design and normalization, and basic overviews of the roles of database administrators and professionals. Students will also be introduced to introductory SQL commands using a command line and existing databases.

Database Fundamentals2
CIS 119A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamentals of computer operations, control language, and file design in the iSeries environment.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 101 or INF 114A or NET 101.
iSeries CL and File Design4
CIS 132A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces program design and development using the RPG IV language. Students will analyze business problems and prepare program definitions as a basis for computerized solutions to those problems. Students interested in accounting applications are encouraged to choose this language option.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 119A
RPG IV4
CIS 211
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the elements of establishing superior information technology service and support. Focus is on interdepartmental cooperation. Customer contact skills including listening, courtesy, conflict management, problem solving, decision making, ethics, follow-up, communications, and user training are covered to enhance the image of the business with internal and external customers.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 201
CSS 211
Information Technology Customer Service and Support4
CIS 233A
4 Quarter Hours

Deals with advanced language features using the RPG IV language. Students are also introduced to the RPG II and RPG III languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 132A
Advanced RPG IV4
CIS 251
4 Quarter Hours

Presents traditional methodologies of system analysis, design, and implementation along with recent developments in the field providing a total approach to information systems development. This course focuses on how to develop information systems in an engineered, disciplined manner utilizing real-world situations and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
One level of a programming language or Junior status.
Systems Development Methods4
CIS 302A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an intermediate level of study of personal and/or business database applications including relational database structure and theory, the structure and maintenance of tables, queries, forms, and reports, and an introduction to macros and switchboards.

Prerequisite(s):
INF 114A.
Intermediate Database Management4
CIS 303A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides coverage of computer hardware in relation to the system: mechanical implementation, electrical implementation, and optical implementation; system capabilities regarding processor function, storage functions, and communications functions; and computer system design factors. Data representation is covered in depth, including integer data, floating point notation, character data as well as data structures. Processor technology and architecture will be covered, as will system integration and performance through logical and physical I/O, device controllers, I/O processing, data and network communication technologies, networks and distributed systems, network architecture, and OSI network layers.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111, CS 231, MTH 111
Computer Architecture4
CIS 310
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111
Visual BASIC4
CIS 311
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates concepts learned in CIS310 and CIS311.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 310
Advanced Visual BASIC4
CIS 313A
4 Quarter Hours

Explores further the features of spreadsheets. Topics include a more in-depth study of spreadsheet functions, database techniques, graphing, and an introduction to macros.

Prerequisite(s):
INF 113
Intermediate Spreadsheets4
CIS 314
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on application development in a Windows environment. This course covers advanced uses of database and spreadsheet packages, sharing of data between programs, and macros development to solve problems. Students also use presentation software, learned in the course, to present their solutions to case-study problems.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A, CIS 313A, INF 112
Advanced Software Solutions4
CIS 331
4 Quarter Hours

Expands on the concepts learned in the introductory course in database creation by introducing students to higher levels of database development and computer science concepts. Students learn SQL in order to study the manipulation of a relational database. This course also includes a survey of database platforms.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 114 or CS 101 or INF 114A or NET 101.
Database Management Using SQL4
CIS 351
4 Quarter Hours

Develops the knowledge and skills required to design databases and information systems for the Web. Includes the development of data models including how to organize the modeling task, manage compromises, design for flexibility, achieve basic and advanced normalization, and develop and use generic models. Explains how to model a problem domain by abstracting objects, attributes, and relationships. Describes object-oriented approaches to model the dynamic behavior of a system in terms of state and process models. Students will construct data and object models using Entity-Relationship (ER), Unified Modeling Language (UML), and other techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A or CIS 331.
System Modeling and Design4
CIS 371
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the integration of healthcare practice with computer technology and information science. Students will identify, gather, process, and manage information obtained and accessed via advanced information technology. Issues related to the protection of privacy, confidentiality, ethics, and security of information in the healthcare environment will be evaluated.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Introduction to Healthcare Informatics4
CIS 403
4 Quarter Hours

Builds upon the theoretical concepts of the Development Cycle learned in the Systems Development Methods. The technical knowledge gained from programming, word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications will also be put to use for the tasks of this course. Students will use the appropriate systems development methodologies, in a team approach, and follow the life cycle methodology and/or the information center techniques learned previously to achieve a demonstrable working solution to a particular Systems Development problem.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 251
Systems Development Project4
CIS 404
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of processor function and system design. Students will evaluate the performance of a given microprocessor using common benchmarks, analyze instruction sets in HLL, RISC, and CISC architectures, and expand their understanding of binary operations and related impact on ALU design. Students will research and compare performance and design factors in parallel, pipelined, and multiprocessor designs; analyze branch prediction impact on program design; and evaluate the effectiveness of hierarchical memory designs. Throughout this course students will engage in periodic research on various topics and will also complete an independent, comprehensive, in-depth analysis of an instructor-approved topic in high performance computer architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 340
CIS 303A or EET 226A.
Advanced Computer Architecture4
CIS 421B
4 Quarter Hours

Exposes students to database administration and the duties of a database administrator (DBA) to include database monitoring, backup and recovery, troubleshooting, and tuning for reliability and performance. Students will install, configure, and maintain an RDBMS including security, backup and recovery operations, and performance tuning.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A or CIS 331.
Database Administration I4
CIS 422
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the database administration tasks introduced in CIS 421B with a focus on backup and recovery tools and techniques, archiving, loading and transporting data, network administration, and server-side and client-side configuration.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 421B
Database Administration II4
CIS 431
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the alignment between business and technology with an emphasis on the use of technology by different organizational units. Decision support systems, enterprise systems, business process reengineering, and knowledge management will be discussed. The advantages and challenges of each system will be evaluated along with system development and implementation strategies.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 351, MGT 321
Enterprise Architecture4
CIS 441
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise and the role information systems plays in it. It develops the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate technology solutions to deal with a variety of business situations. It examines how technology and telecommunications systems enable businesses to succeed in a global marketplace.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 431
IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition4
CIS 451
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the approval, design, implementation, and maintenance of healthcare information systems and examines the application of healthcare practices in the information systems field. Students will complete a research project where an information system solution will be developed for a sample healthcare organization. The project will focus on privacy, security, confidentiality, and usability.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 371, HSC 312, MED 171
Advanced Healthcare Informatics4
CIS 495
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on selected topics of current interest in information systems. Recent development in systems, initiatives and technology related to the information systems field will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
Senior status and acceptance in the program.
Special Topics in Information Systems4
CIS 499
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the systems development process as a whole for the Information Systems field. As part of this course, students will complete a capstone project that examines the use and application of an information system for an organization.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 441
Senior Project in Information Systems4
COL 491
2 Quarter Hours

Provides assistance to students in the preparation of a final portfolio which demonstrates professional and personal growth during students' academic careers. Students provide documentation from courses and work experience to develop a portfolio demonstrating how they have met the criteria for each institutional student learning outcome. This is the capstone course for the Bachelor of General Studies for the Online campus only. The final portfolio will be assessed by Baker College professionals to evaluate if the student has proven competency in the institutional student learning outcomes.

Prerequisite(s):
Senior status, Program Director/Dean approval.
General Studies Capstone Portfolio2
CRJ 101
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the skills, tools, and methods needed for various criminal justice professions. This course explores philosophical underpinnings of crime and punishments among police, corrections, and the courts. Various ethical and duty related issues are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Criminal Justice4
CRJ 106
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the philosophy and history of corrections. This course also includes the development of current forms and approaches to corrections including probation, parole, security concepts, and related agencies. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Corrections4
CRJ 111
4 Quarter Hours

Provides content approved by the Michigan State 9-1-1 Committee meeting the requirements for the basic 40 hour dispatcher training program. Topics include telecommunicator roles, public safety overview, professionalism, teamwork, ethics, stress management, call classification, technology, and customer service. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
9-1-1 Telecommunications I4
CRJ 112
4 Quarter Hours

Provides content approved by the Michigan State 9-1-1 Committee meeting the requirements for the advanced 40 hour dispatcher training program. Topics include domestic violence, suicide intervention, 9-1-1 liability, stress management, and homeland security issues. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJ 111, Student background check.
9-1-1 Telecommunications II4
CRJ 121
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a more in-depth study of corrections as part of the criminal justice system. Specific discussions include the evolution of corrections, organization and development of jails in America, alternatives to incarceration, probation, parole, and the concept of community-based corrections, management and organization of correctional institutions, custodial care, safety and security, and prisoner rights. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Correctional Facilities4
CRJ 131
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the meaning and function of culture, the impact and meaning of discrimination, minorities, attitude formation, and professional responsiveness for criminal justice professionals. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Client Relations4
CRJ 141
4 Quarter Hours

Examines normal versus criminal behavior, human development and criminal patterns, specific problems, and intervention strategies. This course explores psychological, sociological, and biological theories of criminal behavior. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminology4
CRJ 151
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a thorough examination of how the law impacts corrections related decisions. This course also examines constitutional law, the court process, US courts, and prisoner rights. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Legal Issues in Corrections4
CRJ 171
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on unarmed defensive tactics, control and movement of prisoners, control of uncooperative subjects, use of non-lethal weapons, and officer survival. Practical training is based on methods of both defensive and offensive techniques used in the control of violent subjects. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Defensive Tactics4
CRJ 181
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an overview of the historical development and implementation of community-based correctional programs and the advantages, disadvantages, effectiveness, and community impact of such programs. Emphasizes supervision of individuals on probation and parole including interviewing, counseling and referral to resources, and preparing written court reports and oral presentations during pre-sentence investigations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Community Corrections4
CRJ 211
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with interpersonal communication and conflict management skills that can be used to manage cooperative and uncooperative individuals in criminal justice environments. Application of the skills will be practiced through the use of role play exercises in simulated situations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Interpersonal Communication and Conflict Management4
CRJ 221
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the learning opportunity to conduct basic investigations, assessments, interviews, and interrogations which may be necessary in criminal justice settings. Students will practice providing oral summaries, note taking, and computer based report writing in a variety of formats, including logs, client assessments, incident reports, investigation reports, interview summaries, and other related documents. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, Student background check.
Interviewing, Investigations and Report Writing4
CRJ 231
4 Quarter Hours

Examines both historical and contemporary methods of policing. An emphasis is placed on ethical behavior along with an introduction of tools, skills, and methods used for effective policing. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Principles of Policing I4
CRJ 232
4 Quarter Hours

Continues to build on the concepts and methods introduced in CRJ231 and provides additional strategies, techniques, and methods for effective policing. Assesses the societal impact that policing has on the community. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJ 231, Student background check.
Principles of Policing II4
CRJ 261A
4 Quarter Hours

Includes an overview of current forms of security throughout the world. This course allows students to obtain general information on risk management, legal considerations, and ethical issues in the security realm. Students are offered the opportunity to experience risk management activities, communications skills, and develop the ability to effectively seek out a security profession of their choosing.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Security Management4
CRJ 281A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students an opportunity to share current experiences to the didactic components of the program. Requires students to perform a minimum of 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a criminal justice agency under the supervision of appropriate personnel to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, 102 PSY 101 or PSY 111, C or better in CRJ 101, minimum GPA 2.50, Sophomore status, Student background check.
Corequisite(s):
WRK 291B
Criminal Justice Work Experience I4
CRJ 301
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the history of juvenile justice models and current processing of juvenile offenders. This course will also examine how the processing of juvenile offenders differs from adult offenders and the unique problems associated with juvenile offenders. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Juvenile Justice Concepts4
CRJ 311
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on foundational ethical principles and theories including the application of ethical decision making as it relates to criminal justice professionals. The societal implications of unethical behavior are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice4
CRJ 321
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the legal system using classic and contemporary case law to provide a foundation of legal knowledge. The content and impact of several milestone Supreme Court decisions are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminal Law4
CRJ 331
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on a range of technical solutions available to law enforcement to retrieve data as part of the investigatory process. Identify theft and various types of online fraud are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Cybercrime Investigations4
CRJ 341
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of numerous forensic science tools used to investigate criminal activity and the collection of evidence ranging from finger printing to DNA. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Forensic Science4
CRJ 351
4 Quarter Hours

Instructs the appropriate methods and procedures for collection, handling, documenting, and storing evidence for later use in criminal proceedings. The consequences for mishandling evidence are also explored. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Evidence Collection and Procedures4
CRJ 361