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We’re here with information and resources.

We’re here for you.

The Baker College Academics department provides support and coordination for all academic areas at Baker College, including the academic calendar, curriculum, counseling and advising, recordkeeping, and services for individuals with special needs.

If you have a question or concern that’s not answered here, please contact us. Our goal is to help you achieve your educational objectives, and one of the important ways we do that is by providing information, resources, and advisory services.

Whether you are seeking career advice, counseling, looking for academic records, or looking to change a course or program, we’re ready to help.

FAQ'S

  • Is there online tutoring for APA styles?

    Online students can find help with APA citations and formatting in their Blackboard classroom.

    • Cick the Online Tutoring button on the left-hand side of the page.
    • Click on Schedules. 
    • Click on English (between Economics and Finance).
    • Click the Enroll button next to APA Questions & Answers Classroom.
    • Click Submit.

    After you enroll in the APA Classroom, you'll find all the available APA-related resources. You can also ask questions on the Discussion Board, which is monitored by Baker's online librarians. For more information, contact us at library@baker.edu.

  • How do I sign up for tutoring?

    Contact Learning Support Services on your campus to sign up for tutoring. If you're a Baker Online student or the in a Center for Graduate Studies program, you may request tutoring by visiting Blackboard's Community tab, in the Institution Discussion Boards area.

  • If a new disability evaluation is needed, who pays for it?

    Neither your high school nor your postsecondary school is required to conduct or pay for a new evaluation to document your disability and need for accommodations.

  • Do I have to prove that I have a disability to receive accommodations?

    Yes. You are required to provide relevant comprehensive documentation that without the services you would not have equal access.

  • Do I have to inform a postsecondary school that I have a disability?

    No. However, if you want the school to provide an accommodation, you must identify yourself as having a disability.

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Baker College Academic Resources

Academics

We’re here with information and resources.

We’re here for you.

The Baker College Academics department provides support and coordination for all academic areas at Baker College, including the academic calendar, curriculum, counseling and advising, recordkeeping, and services for individuals with special needs.

If you have a question or concern that’s not answered here, please contact us. Our goal is to help you achieve your educational objectives, and one of the important ways we do that is by providing information, resources, and advisory services.

Whether you are seeking career advice, counseling, looking for academic records, or looking to change a course or program, we’re ready to help.

Academic Calendar

Spring 2014

On-Ground:  April 3 - June 25
Online First Session:  April 3 - May 14
Online Second Session:  May 15 - June 25

Fall 2014

On-Ground:  September 29 - December 13
Online First Session:  September 25 - November 5
Online Second Session:  November 6 - December 17


Winter 2015

On-Ground:  January 12 - March 20
Online First Session:  January 8 - February 18
Online Second Session:  February 19 - April 1

Spring 2015

On-Ground:  April 6 - June 12
Online First Session:  April 2 - May 13
Online Second Session:  May 14 - June 24

Summer 2015

On-Ground:  June 29 - August 29
Online First Session:  June 25 - August 5
Online Second Session:  August 6 - September 16

Fall 2015

On-Ground:  September 28 - December 12
Online First Session:  September 24 - November 4
Online Second Session:  November 5 - December 16


Winter 2016

On-Ground:  January 11 - March 19
Online First Session:  January 7 - February 17
Online Second Session:  February 18 - March 30

Spring 2016

On-Ground:  April 4 - June 11
Online First Session:  March 31 - May 11
Online Second Session:  May 12 - June 22

Summer 2016

On-Ground:  June 27 - August 27
Online First Session:  June 23 - August 3
Online Second Session:  August 4 - September 14

Fall 2016

On-Ground:  September 26 - December 10
Online First Session:  September 22 - November 2
Online Second Session:  November 3 - December 14


Winter 2017

On-Ground:  January 9 - March 18
Online First Session:  January 5 - February 15
Online Second Session:  February 16 - March 29

Spring 2017

On-Ground:  April 3 - June 10
Online First Session:  March 30 - May 10
Online Second Session:  May 11 - June 21

Summer 2017

On-Ground:  June 26 - August 26
Online First Session:  June 22 - August 2
Online Second Session:  August 3 - September 13

Fall 2017

On-Ground:  September 25 - December 9
Online First Session:  September 21 - November 1
Online Second Session:  November 2 - December 13


Winter 2018

On-Ground:  January 8 - March 17
Online First Session:  January 4 - February 14
Online Second Session:  February 15 - March 28

Spring 2018

On-Ground:  April 2 - June 19
Online First Session:  March 29 - May 9
Online Second Session:  May 10 - June 20

Summer 2018

On-Ground:  June 25 - August 25
Online First Session:  June 21 - August 1
Online Second Session:  August 2 - September 12

Fall 2018

On-Ground:  September 24 - December 8
Online First Session:  September 20 - October 31
Online Second Session:  November 1 - December 12


Winter 2019

On-Ground:  January 7 - March 16
Online First Session:  January 3 - February 13
Online Second Session:  February 14 - March 27

Spring 2019

On-Ground:  April 1 - June 8
Online First Session:  March 28 - May 8
Online Second Session:  May 9 - June 19

Summer 2019

On-Ground:  June 224 - August 24
Online First Session:  June 20 - July 31
Online Second Session:  August 1 - September 11

Fall 2019

On-Ground:  September 30 - December 14
Online First Session:  September 26 - November 6
Online Second Session:  November 7 - December 18


Winter 2020

On-Ground:  January 13 - March 21
Online First Session:  January 9 - February 19
Online Second Session:  February 20 - April 1

Spring 2020

On-Ground:  April 6 - June 13
Online First Session:  April 2 - May 13
Online Second Session:  May 14 - June 24

Summer 2020

On-Ground:  June 29 - August 29
Online First Session:  June 25 - August 5
Online Second Session:  August 6 - September 16

Policies and Procedures

The policies and procedures of Baker College guide our faculty, staff, and students in achieving our mission: to provide quality higher education and training which enable graduates to be successful throughout challenging and rewarding careers. 

Specific information about our academic policies can be found through the resources below, along with information about office hours and policies for each campus.

Philosophy of Developmental Education

Developmental Education Mission Statement

The mission of developmental education is to provide a comprehensive preparatory program enabling students to acquire academic skills necessary to complete a college-level course of study.

Developmental Education Goals

  1. Provide appropriate educational opportunities and services
  2. Ensure proper placement of students
  3. Maintain high academic standards that support student success in college-level courses
  4. Enhance the quality of student learning
  5. Promote continued development and application of adult learning theory, adhering to best practices
  6. Provide students with opportunities to build strong foundational skills
  7. Be sensitive and responsive to individual differences among students
  8. Promote a collaborative and supportive environment for faculty, staff, and students

Developmental Education Objectives

  1. Entry-level students will complete appropriate placement testing.
  2. Students will use developmental education resources provided by the College.
  3. Students will demonstrate reasoning, communication, and comprehension skills required for college-level work.
  4. Students will demonstrate competency in reading, writing, and mathematics through exit processes.

The following courses are designed to meet the above objectives:

  • ENG 091 - English Review
  • ENG 098B - College Reading
  • MTH 091 - Essential Math Concepts
  • MTH 099E - Pre-Algebra

In addition to these developmental education courses, other developmental courses, specific to a program area, may be required. See individual program requirements for details.

Developmental Courses

Baker College supports its Right-to-Try Admissions Policy with several educational services. Some students who enter Baker College require assistance to meet the pressures of an academic community. Because of this, Baker College provides these students with a developmental education program which enables them to achieve success in college and their future careers.

  1. Students with below college-level reading skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in College Reading (ENG 098B).
  2. Students with below college-level English writing skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in English Review (ENG 091).
  3. Students with below college-level math skills, as determined by the results of a placement test, are required to enroll in Essential Math Concepts (MTH 091) and/or Pre-Algebra (MTH 099E).
  4. Students who place into these developmental areas should take the developmental course(s) the first quarter. These courses should be completed within the first academic year, prior to enrolling in a college-level general education course.
  5. Students who place into two or three developmental areas, one of which is MTH 091 Essential Math Concepts, are required to enroll part time (less than 12 credits) the first quarter of attendance only.
  6. Students must successfully complete all required developmental education courses. Successful completion of each of the developmental courses requires passing a consistent exit assessment that demonstrates a minimum standard of competency in order to enroll in the subsequent college-level courses. Students unable to successfully complete (pass) any one or more of the developmental education courses (ENG 091, ENG 098B, MTH 091, MTH 099E) within three attempts, including withdrawals, will face academic dismissal from the College. For both the second and third attempts, students are placed on a Student Learning Contract. (A second attempt contract serves as a warning, and a third attempt contract serves as notice of the student facing academic dismissal.)
Accreditation – MBA

Master of Business Adminstration (MBA) Program

External peer review is the primary means of assuring and improving the quality of higher education institutions and programs in the United States. This recognition is accomplished through program accreditation, approval or certification.

Baker College has received specialized accreditation for its business programs through the International Assembly for Collegiate Business Education (IACBE) located at 11374 Strang Line Road in Lenexa, Kansas, USA. The business program in the following degree is accredited by the IACBE:

  • Master of Business Administration

Master’s Level IACBE Outcomes

In master’s-level programs, knowledge of the key content areas and functional disciplines of business is assumed. Graduates of master’s-level programs should acquire a depth of knowledge in these areas that exceeds that of the typical bachelor’s degree graduate. Graduates of master’s-level programs in business should be able to:

  1. Recognize problems.
  2. Integrate theory and practice for the purpose of strategic analysis.
  3. Employ and apply quantitative techniques and methods in the analysis of real-world business situations.
  4. Communicate to relevant audiences;  graduates should be able to:
    a.    Compose clear, consistent, and effective written forms of communication
    b.  Compose and present effective oral business presentations.
  5. Work effectively with a team of colleagues on diverse projects.
  6. Identify and analyze the ethical obligations and responsibilities of business.

MBA Program - IACBE Assessment Reports
 


MBA Program - Annual Assessment Reports
 


The MBA program provides the following majors:
 

Academic Probation and Dismissal

Academic Standing

Undergraduate
Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 2.0 to graduate from any program. For students to stay off academic probation, the following grade point averages must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-16 1.5
17-32 1.65
33-48 1.80
49-64 1.90
65+ 2.00

Graduate
Students must have a cumulative grade point average of at least 3.0 to graduate. A grade of “C” or better is required in all classes used to calculate hours for graduation. For students to stay off academic probation, the following grade point averages must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-12 2.75
13-24 2.87
25-Graduation 3.00

Academic Probation Policy

If the student’s cumulative GPA falls below the appropriate minimum GPA required to remain in good academic standing as illustrated on the step scale, the student will be placed on academic probation for the following quarter. The student will be advised to restrict his/her course load and curtail extracurricular activities and work schedules. If the student attains a satisfactory GPA according to the step scale in the probationary quarter, but his/her cumulative GPA is still below the step scale, the student will remain on probation for the next quarter.

Removal from Academic Probation

The student will be removed from academic probation at the end of the quarter in which his/her cumulative GPA places him/her in good academic standing as illustrated on the step scale.

Academic Suspension Policy

Students are academically suspended based on either of the following:

  • A student receives all failures his/her first quarter.
  • A student on academic probation who earns a GPA at the end of the probationary quarter lower than that called for by the step scale.

Consideration for re-enrollment will be given to academically suspended students only after an absence of at least one academic quarter. Requests to re-enroll are processed through the Academic Department.

Students who were living in Baker College housing at the time of academic suspension must reapply in order to be readmitted to college housing.

Academic Dismissal

Students are academically dismissed based on either of the following:

  • A student is unable to successfully complete (pass) any developmental education course within three attempts (one attempt for COL115).
  • A student received a prior academic suspension and his/her GPA falls below the step scale regarding good academic standing.

Baker College reserves the right to academically dismiss any student whose level of achievement makes it inadvisable for the student to remain in school. Students who are academically dismissed may not attend classes in any future quarter, unless they apply for and receive Academic Amnesty. Readmission for developmental education academic dismissal may be considered earlier than the four year requirement if the student produces documentation of transferable college-level math and English courses which were completed following dismissal from Baker College. If a student requests Amnesty after four years and retakes COMPASS, he/she may be readmitted if COMPASS scores indicate that no developmental courses are needed.

Academic Amnesty: Fresh Start Program

The Fresh Start Program, which is for undergraduate students only, allows students with poor academic records who have not attended Baker College for at least four years to resume their college education with a clean slate. A student with a poor academic record is defined as a student who is not in good academic standing. If a student is approved for the Fresh Start Program, all previous grades and courses will be excluded from the computation of the student’s grade point average. Courses passed with a “C” or better can count as a credit grade for program requirements and graduation. All courses and all grades remain on the student’s transcript with a notation of Fresh Start on the transcript. The Fresh Start Program can only be used once by a student. Requests should be made in the Registrar’s Office, with final approval from the Chief Academic Officer/Vice President for Academics. Approval for academic amnesty must be received prior to the end of the quarter in which the student returns. Once a student is granted academic amnesty, the student’s permanent record cannot be changed.

The Fresh Start Program will not supersede the Baker College Satisfactory Academic Progress Rules for receiving federal and state financial aid funds, which are based on cumulative grades, hours attempted, and hours completed. If a “Fresh Start” student is in violation of the financial aid Satisfactory Academic Progress Rules and wishes to establish eligibility for those funds, an appeal for re-instatement must be submitted to the Financial Aid Office.

Testing

Baker College offers many non-traditional credit options for students with varied academic and professional backgrounds. It is a policy of Baker College to award credit to those with the appropriate experience.

For more information about the types of testing available on your campus, contact:

Waiver Tests

Waiver test credit may be earned for skills already developed. This credit is awarded based on an examination developed by Baker College in the subject area.

Credit By Examination

These national credit by examination programs offer students the opportunity to demonstrate their academic proficiency in various general education and specific subject areas. Such proficiency may have been developed by the student outside of a traditional classroom through such means as personal reading, adult education courses, job experiences, etc.

Please visit the websites listed below for specific information regarding national credit by examination programs:

If you would like to schedule CLEP and DANTES testing, (available only on the Flint Campus) contact the Testing Services Department by email at fltesting@baker.edu or by callilng (810) 766-4300.

For more information about credit by examination available on your campus, please call the contact listed above.

WorkKeys® Assessments

WorkKeys® is a workplace skills assessment system used by employers, students, workers, and educators across the nation. The WorkKeys® system from ACT is being introduced in high schools across the country to help students understand how to improve job and career skills for better-paying jobs. WorkKeys® measures skills in:

  • Reading for Information
  • Applied Mathematics
  • Listening
  • Writing
  • Locating Information
  • Business Writing
  • Teamwork

These are skills that employers feel are critical to job success. WorkKeys® assessment results demonstrate current ability level to employers. These assessments help businesses and educators understand each other’s needs. The goal is to ensure that students enter the work force with a strong foundation that enables them to do well in their chosen career.

If you would like to learn more about WorkKeys, or to schedule a test:

Registrar

Baker College Registrars are here to help you meet your educational goals as quickly and efficiently as possible. We can help you with:

  • Program changes and other course registration concerns
  • Advice for bachelor degrees
  • Non-traditional credit
  • Transfer of credits 
  • Graduation requirements
  • Certifications
  • Registrations
  • Transcripts and other academic records

Baker College offers many non-traditional credit options for students with varied academic and professional backgrounds. Non-traditional credit may include:

  • Articulation
  • Experiential credit
  • Credit by examination
  • CLEP
  • Advanced placement

To learn more about non-traditional credit, please visit our sections on Articulation or Testing. You can also call the Academic Office for more information.

Open Class List

The Open Class List can also be found at https://carina.baker.edu/dlvopen

Graduation Information

Information for all Baker College undergraduate students:

 

Application for Graduation 

Accurate completion of the graduation application is vital for the preparation of your diploma and the posting of your graduation to the permanent record of the College. The application can be completed online at www.baker.edu/graduation.

Honor Graduates

  • Graduates who achieve a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher are awarded a special distinction at graduation; 3.9-4.0 Summa Cum Laude (gold cord); 3.70-3.89 Magna Cum Laude (silver cord); and 3.50-3.69 Cum Laude (white cord). Unofficial honor status for undergraduates for the spring graduation ceremony will be based on the student’s GPA at the time graduation materials are prepared. If a graduate’s status changes after the final audit, the graduate may obtain the appropriate honor cord.
  • Students graduating from Baker College who are serving or have served in the military will receive recognition cords (red/white/blue cord).

Participation

Students who graduated from programs during the fall 2014, winter 2015, spring 2015 and summer 2015 quarters may participate in the 2015 ceremony. Spring 2015 quarter students may participate if all required classes will be completed by the end of the spring 2015 quarter. Summer 2015 quarter students may also walk if all courses will be completed at the end of that quarter. Note: Students who are not enrolled in all classes required for graduation may be denied participation in the ceremony.


Diplomas

Diplomas and certificates will be mailed approximately eight weeks after program completion. If a balance is owed to the college the diploma will be held until the obligation is satisfied.

Financial Services

  • Prior to leaving Baker College, student loan borrowers are required by government regulations to complete an Exit Loan Counseling session. To begin your exit counseling session at the Department of Education’s website, click here: Exit Loan Counseling
  • A one-time $50.00 undergraduate graduation processing fee is required. Please see Financial Services regarding payment.

Attire

Commencement Day is a proud occasion; please dress to impress!  Jeans, shorts, t-shirts, flip flops, casual sandals and athletic shoes are not appropriate.


2015 Commencement Ceremony Information

Allen Park

  • Graduation will be held on Saturday June 6th, 2015 @ 11:00am at Compuware Arena, 14900 Beck Road, Plymouth Twp., MI 48170. Graduates and their guests should plan on arriving at Compuware Arena by 10:30 a.m. on graduation day in order to allow time for parking, seating of guests and processional line up for the graduates.
  • Cap and gown packages will be available for pick up on Wednesday, May 27 and May 28, in room B111 from 11 a.m. - 3 p.m. and then from 4 - 6 p.m. Cap and gowns will then be available in the academic office during regular business hours, through June 4. Please be prepared to show your picture ID when picking up your cap and gown packet.
  • Graduation announcements and rings may be ordered online at www.jostens.com.
  • Flowers will be available for purchase at Compuware Arena the day of the ceremony.
  • John Bianchi Photography will be taking professional portraits throughout the ceremony. Proofs and orders will be available at www.gradphotonetwork.com or via email at johnbianchiphoto@yahoo.com.
  • For additional information, please contact: Alisha Harden, 313.425.3869 or Michelle Maxfield, 313.425.3750.

Auburn Hills

  • Graduation will be held on Saturday, June 13, 2015 at The Apostolic Church of Auburn Hills, on Squirrel Road just north of Tienken Road.  The address is 3655 N. Squirrel, Auburn Hills, 48326.
    • 12:00 pm:  Health Sciences
    • 4:00 pm: MBA Business, Education, Human Services and Technical (including Graphic Communication)
  • Due to seating at the ceremony venue, each graduate is welcome to invite a maximum of ten guests to the commencement.
  • Cap and gown distribution information will be available by spring quarter.
  • Photo proofs are emailed approximately 2-3 days after the ceremony.  Orders must be placed through Graduation Foto Company.  Graduation Foto:  www.graduationfoto.com or call (734) 655-3400
  • Fresh flowers and commemorative commencement T-Shirts will be available for purchase at Baker College of Auburn Hills Commencement or are available to pre-order and reserve at: www.commencementflowers.com/index.php/BakerAuburnHills
  • Still have questions?  Contact Career Services at (248) 276-8216 or email careerserv-ah@baker.edu

Cadillac

  • Graduation will be held on Friday, June 12th, 2015 at Resurrection Life Church, 9127 E 44 1/2 Road in Cadillac.
  • More information will be mailed to graduates in April that will have specific times of the ceremonies, what times graduates will be required to be there, cap and gown pick-up dates/times, etc.

Cass City

  • Graduation will be held on Friday, June 12, 2015, at 7:00 p.m. at the Cass City Middle School located at 4805 Ale St, Cass City, MI 48726.
  • Cap and Gown pick-up begins Thursday, June 4 - Wednesday, June 10, 2015.
  • Honor cords can be picked up by graduates meeting the honor criteria at cap and gown distribution
  • Graduation announcements may be ordered online at www.jostens.com.
  • A photographer will be taking professional portraits throughout the ceremony. Information for ordering photos will be available at the graduation ceremony.

Clinton Township

  • Graduation will be held on Saturday, June 13, 2015 at 11:00 AM at Bethesda Christian Church, 14000 Metropolitan Parkway in Sterling Heights.
  • All students participating in the ceremonies will receive a letter in mid-April with information concerning cap and gown pick-up as well as specifics about the ceremony.

Flint

  • Graduation will be held Sunday, June 14, 2015 at 1:00PM at the Perani Arena and Event Center.
  • All students participating in the ceremony will receive communication in mid April with instructions on when and where they can pick up their cap and gown as well as specifics about the ceremony.
  • Honor cords can be picked up by graduates meeting the honor criteria at cap and gown distribution
  • Graduation announcement may be ordered online at www.jostens.com.
  • A photographer will be taking professional portraits throughout the ceremony. Information for ordering photos will be available at the graduation ceremony.

Jackson

  • Graduation will be held Friday, June 12th, 2015 at 7:00pm, at Jackson High School Auditorium. Graduates must arrive no later than 6pm for line-up and instructions. Guest seating is on a first come-first seated basis. Access to the auditorium begins at 6:00 pm. Lines will form outside the auditorium prior.
  • All students participating in the ceremony will receive a letter in early May with specific information about the ceremony.
  • Jackson Students
    • Cap and gown packages will be available for pick up beginning Tuesday, May 26 through Thursday, June 11, 2015 in the Academic Office during their regular business hours.   The Academic Office hours are Monday – Thursday from 9am-6pm and Friday 8-5pm.  Please be prepared to show your picture ID when picking up your cap and gown packet.
  • Coldwater site Students
    • Cap and gown packages will be available for pick up beginning Tuesday, May 26 through Thursday, June 11, 2015 in the Coldwater Office during regular business hours. The Coldwater Office hours are Monday – Thursday from 10am-9pm.  Please be prepared to show your picture ID when picking up your cap and gown packet.
    • Due to seating at the ceremony venue, each graduate is welcome to invite a maximum of four guests to the commencement.  All Guests MUST have a ticket to secure a seat; this includes all children. Tickets with be issued with the cap and gown packages.
  • Professional Photographs will be taken before and during the ceremony.
  • Graduation announcements may be ordered online at www.jostens.com.
  • Contacts regarding the graduation ceremony are Laura Macklin, Academic Division Specialist, (517) 780-4542, laura.macklin@baker.edu, Nancy Hill, Dean of Developmental/General Education, (517) 780-4569, nancy.hill@baker.edu or Jennifer Miller, Coldwater Campus Director, (517) 781-4484, jennifer.miller.121@baker.edu.

Muskegon

  • Graduation will be held Friday, June 12, 2015, at 7:00 p.m. at the L.C. Walker arena, 955 Fourth Street, Muskegon. No tickets are necessary.  Guest seating is on a first come-first seated basis.  Access to the Arena begins at 6 p.m.  Line will form outside the Arena prior.
  • Cap and gown packages, including honor cords, will be available for pickup on Monday, June 1, 2015, and Tuesday, June 2, 2015.
  • Graduation announcements may be ordered on line www.herffjones.com/college/graduation.
  • The contact regarding the graduation ceremony is Sherry Begue, Administrative Assistant for Financial Services, (231) 777-5246., sherry.begue@baker.edu.

On-Line/Center for Graduate Studies

  • Graduation will be held on Friday June 5, 2015 at 7:00 pm at Whiting Auditorium, 1241 East Kearsley Street, Flint MI 48503. No tickets are necessary. Guest seating is on a first come-first seated basis. Access to the auditorium begins at 6:30 pm. Lines will form outside the auditorium prior. If the auditorium fills, the doors will be closed and no one else will be allowed in.
  • Cap and gown packages, including honor cords, will be mailed by May 22, 2015.
  • Honors are issued at the undergraduate level only.
  • All students participating in the ceremony will receive a letter in mid-April with information concerning the day of the ceremonies activities, other instructions and directions.
  • Professional photographs will be taken at Ceremony.
  • Graduation announcements may be ordered online at www.jostens.com.
  • Reserve your Commencement Flowers ahead of time and flowers will be available at your Commencement Site. Pre-order thru the following Baker College website: www.CommencementFlowers.com/index.php/BakerGrad OR Commencement Flowers will be available for purchase at the Whiting Auditorium the day of the ceremony.
  • Contact regarding the graduation ceremony is Marlene Ewing, Academic Services Associate, (810) 766-2106, marlene.ewing@baker.edu.

Owosso

  • Graduation will be held Friday, June 12th, 2015 at the Perani Arena and Event Center. The ceremony will begin promptly at 5:30 pm. Graduates need to arrive for line-up and instructions no later than 4:15 pm.
  • All students participating will receive a letter in early May with specifics about the ceremony. Tickets will NOT be issued and graduates can bring as many guests as they would like.
  • Contacts regarding the graduation ceremony:
  • Cap and gown distribution will be held in Career Services on Wednesday, June 3rd and Thursday, June 4th from 8:00 am to 5:00 pm. Photo ID is required for pick up. If you are unable to pick up your gown during the scheduled times, it will be taken directly to Perani for distribution prior to the ceremony. Please contact Career Services if you have questions regarding your cap and gown: careerserv-ow@baker.edu

Port Huron

  • Graduation will be held on Monday, June 15, 2015 at 6:30 p.m. at McMorran Place Theater. Graduates must be to McMorran no later than 5:30 p.m. Tickets will not be issued and graduates can bring as many guests as they would like.
  • Graduation announcements may be ordered on line at www.herffjones.com/college/graduation.
  • Cap and gown pick up will be the week of June 1st through June 5th from 9-6 Monday - Thursday and 8-5 Friday in the administrative offices. Students must have ID card to pick up cap and gown.
  • All students participating in the ceremony will receive a letter in mid-April with information concerning cap and gown pick-up as well as specifics about the ceremony.
Graduation Application

All students who anticipate successful completion of their program course requirements for a degree or certificate must complete the Graduation Application one quarter prior to their graduation date in order to officially graduate.

You can fill out the Graduation Application online or by visting the Academic Office on your campus.

Transcript Request

Orders to release transcripts are processed through the electronic ordering system. Transcripts sent online are fully secure and FERPA compliant. Our PCI certification and third-party testing ensure that security is never in question.

Choose one of the following to request an official transcript online and track it in process:

There is a nominal fee associated with our online transcript process. Please have a debit or credit card available.

A hold on your Baker College account will not prevent you from requesting a transcript through Parchment Exchange. However, Baker College will not be able to release your transcript until the hold is resolved.

For questions or concerns regarding transcripts and other academic records, contact the Office of the registrar by sending an email to: transcripts@baker.edu.

Grades

Grades are computed at the end of each course. You may access final grades through the Student Online Links to Academic Records (SOLAR) System.

Baker College no longer prints or mails final grade reports. 

Your final grade report will list your:

  • Courses
  • Grade for each course
  • Grade Point Average (GPA) for that quarter
  • Cumulative GPA

Grades | Letter and Grade Point Value

A     =    4.0 points
A-     =      3.7 points
B+      =      3.3 points
B     =    3.0 points
B-     =    2.7 points
C+    =    2.3 points
C    =    2.0 points
C-    =    1.7 points
D+    =    1.3 points
D    =    1.0 points
D-    =    0.7 points
F    =    Failure = 0.0 points
P    =    Passed = 4.0 points 
WF    =    Withdrawal Failing = 0.0 points

GPA is not computed for the following grades:

CR    =    Credit (undergraduate - C or better, graduate - B or better.)
EL    =    Non-traditional credit
EX    =    Extended (used in selected courses to indicate progress, but failure to acquire all required competencies)
R    =    Articulation Credit
S    =    Satisfactory
T    =    Test Credit
U    =    Unsatisfactory

Hours and GPA are not computed for the following:

AU     =    Audit
I    =    Incomplete
NC     =    No Credit
PR    =    Progress (coursework extends beyond the end of the quarter)
W    =    Withdrawal
WP    =    Withdrawal Passing

To compute the Baker College cumulative GPA:

  • Calculate the honor points for each course completed (grade points multiplied by credit hours; an “A” or 4.0 grade in a four credit-hour class yields 16 honor points).
  • Add all honor points earned at Baker.
  • Divide by the total credit hours attempted for all quarters at Baker.

Incomplete Grade Policy

An instructor may agree to issue an Incomplete (I) grade for a course if all of the following conditions are met:

  • The student requests the Incomplete (I) grade before the end of the course.
  • The student has completed 80% of the total coursework and has a chance at a passing grade in the course.
  • The student is unable to complete the course requirements within the regular time frame due to significant, extenuating circumstances. Documentation may be required.
  • The student and instructor have signed a “contract” which clearly states the requirements to be completed and the due date for the completion of each requirement. The due date may not exceed the last day of the following quarter.

If the coursework is not completed by the agreed upon due date, the final course grade will be based on the work that was completed by the end of the quarter in which the course was taken.

Honors - Undergraduate

The President’s List
Students who earn a 4.0 GPA during a quarter in which 12 credit hours or more were completed will be placed on the President’s List for publication the following quarter. These students may also be invited to attend a President’s Luncheon/Dinner held in their honor.

The Full-Time Student Deans’ List
Students who earn a 3.5 to 3.99 GPA during a quarter in which 12 credit hours or more were completed will be placed on the Full-Time Student Deans’ List for publication the following quarter.

The Part-Time Student Deans’ List
Students who earn a 3.5 to 4.0 GPA during a quarter in which 4 to 11 credit hours were completed will be placed on the Part-Time Student Deans’ List for publication the following quarter.

Honors - Graduates

Graduates who achieve a 3.5 cumulative GPA or higher are awarded a special distinction at graduation: 

  • 3.9 - 4.0 Summa Cum Laude
  • 3.7 - 3.899 Magna Cum Laude
  • 3.5 - 3.699 Cum Laude

Unofficial honor status for undergraduates for the spring graduation ceremony will be based on the student’s GPA at the time graduation materials are prepared. If a graduate’s status changes after the final audit, the graduate may obtain the appropriate honor cord. In addition, faculty on each campus may select an Honor Graduate—a student who has demonstrated the greatest potential for success in his/her field of study—in each of the degree disciplines.

Class Status - Undergraduate

The following schedule defines the number of credit hours that must be completed to qualify for class designations:

  • Freshman: Less than 45 credit hours completed
  • Sophmore: 45 to 89 credit hours completed
  • Junior*: 90 to 135 credit hours completed
  • Senior: 136 or more credit hours completed

*In addition to credit hours, the student must be currently enrolled in a program that constitutes the appropriate class level. For example, to be considered a junior, the student must be enrolled in a bachelor degree program and have already completed an associate degree or its equivalent.

Academic Standing - Undergraduate

Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 2.0 to graduate from any program. For students to stay off academic probation, the following GPAs must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-16 1.5
17-32 1.65
33-48 1.80
49-64 1.90
65+ 2.00

Note: The graduation requirement of a 2.0 supersedes the academic standing requirements.

Academic Standing - Graduate

Students must have a cumulative GPA of at least 3.0 to graduate. A grade of “C” or better is required in all classes used to calculate hours for graduation. For students to stay off academic probation, the following GPAs must be earned.

Hours Attempted Minimum GPA
1-12 2.75
13-24 2.87
25-Graduation 3.00
Advising / Counseling

Helping you prepare for a successful career is what our advisors are trained to do. Whether you are a new or returning student, we can provide academic advising, career counseling, or personal counseling to help you explore and clarify your educational and career goals and help you decide on a career path.

To receive personal assistance, information, and resources, call or stop in at your campus Counseling and Advising office to speak with a Counselor or Advisor. We’ll work closely with you to identify the program—and career—that’s right for you.

Our office hours are Monday through Thursday, 8:00 am - 6:30 pm, and Friday, 8 am - 5 pm

Personal Counseling

Assistance is available to aid students with personal and career decision making, college adjustments, and study techniques. For serious long-term, personal problems that may require ongoing treatment, referrals will be made to other trained professionals or agencies that specialize in your area of need.

All counseling sessions will be held in confidence unless the student agrees that certain information may be shared with others. The only exceptions to release information would be to report child abuse or to prevent obvious danger to yourself or others.

Stop by your campus Counseling/Advising office if you feel you would benefit from speaking with a counselor or advisor.

Disability Services

Baker College recognizes that qualified students who have been diagnosed or identified as having a learning, physical, or emotional disability are entitled to equal educational access.

In compliance with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973, as amended, and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA), Baker College is committed to making every effort to provide reasonable, appropriate accommodations for students with diabilities.

At each campus, we have designated a Disability Services Coordinator (DSC) who works with students and faculty members to accommodate the student’s needs.

Disability Services Process

Disability services may be provided after completing the following three steps:

  • Meet with the Disability Services Coordinator.
  • Submit the Disability Services Request Form  (47 KB).
  • Submit current and comprehensive disability documentation.

To officially identify yourself as a student in need of services, contact the Disability Services Coordinator on your campus.

Forms

Guidelines for Documentation

* This document will be posted as soon as possible. Please contact your campus Disability Services Coordinator for immediate assistance.

Information provided to DSC is confidential documentation and evaluation information will not be released without the signed consent of the student.

Disability Services Coordinators Contact Information

Allen Park
Lisa Green
(313) 425-3708
lisa.green@baker.edu

Auburn Hills
Chip Evens
(248) 276-8241
chip.evans@baker.edu

Cadillac
Cindy Deemer
(231) 876-3109
cindy.deemer@baker.edu

Cass City
Karen Easterling
(989) 872-1129
karen.easterling@baker.edu

Center for Graduate Studies/Online
Dawn Prueter
(810) 766-4021
dawn.prueter@baker.edu

Clinton Township
Jeff Simms
(568) 790-9716
jeff.simms@baker.edu

Flint
Nancy Daily
(810) 766-4137
nancy.daily@baker.edu

Jackson/Coldwater
Josephine Hones
(517) 841-4523
josephine.hones@baker.edu

Muskegon
Chris Bultema
(231) 777-5237
chris.bultema@baker.edu

Owosso
Carol Boyer
(989) 729-3362
carol.boyer@baker.edu

Port Huron
Colleen Kaltz
(810) 989-2383
colleen.kaltz@baker.edu

Course Equipment & Software Requirements
Course Number Course Name Equipment/Software Required Software Available From
BUS660 The Marketing Environment Web cam with built in microphone (required)

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

CIS251 System Development Methods Microsoft Visio 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS310 Visual Basic Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS311 Advanced Visual Basic Microsoft Visual Studio 2010 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS351 System Modeling and Design Microsfot Visio 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS403 Systems Development Project Microsfot Project 2007 or Newer MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CIS421B Database Administration I Oracle 10g Personal Edition otn.oracle.com
(See Note 2)
CIS422 Databse Administration II Oracle 10g Personal Edition otn.oracle.com
(See Note 2)
CS217A C++ Programming Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS218A Object-Oriented Language with C++ Microsoft Visual Studio .NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
CS221 Introduction to Java Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS222 Programming with Java Java 2 SDK, Linksys Wireless-G Broadband Router (WRT54G2) by Cisco www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS223 Java Object Oriented Programming Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS311A Java Programming Java 2 SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS321 Data Structures and Algorithms I Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and Windows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS322 Data Structures and Algorithms II Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and WIndows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
CS422A Database Programming I Oracle 10g Personal Edition www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
CS423 Database Programming II Oracle 10g Personal Edition www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
GRC131A Introduction to Graphics Imaging Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
(See Note 3)
GSD311 C Software Solutions Microsoft Visual Studio . NET 2008 and WIndows XP Professional MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
GSD321 Game Console Design Microsoft Xbox360 w/ Hard Drive  
INF112 Word Procession Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF113 Electronic Spreadsheets Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF114A Intro to Database Applications Internet Explorer Bookstore
(See Note 3)
INF121 Introduction to Windows Windows 8 Bookstore
INF141A Microsoft PowerPoint Internet Explorer Bookstore
MIS511 Management Information Systems

Web cam with built in microphone(required)

Apple iTunes-Free and QuickTime-Free (both are required)

One of the following is required based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Vision Pro only

Windows Only: M2Convert (required)

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech QuickCam 9000, or Logitech QuickCam Fusion Web cam and M2Convert Software

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

ITS341 Scripting for Network Administrators Windows PowerShell Download from Microsoft
PPM311 Project Planning Microsfot Project 2007 or greater MSDNAA
(See Note 1)
SPK201 Oral Communications

Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only.

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

SPK211 Group Dynamics Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only.

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

WEB201 Web Multimedia Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB221 Web Scripting Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB222 Internet Commerce Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB241 ActionScript Programming Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium Bookstore
WEB321 Web Application Development Tools Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium or Newer - Full Install Bookstore
WEB331 Enterprise Java J2EE SDK www.sun.com
(See Note 2)
WEB361 Web Server Administration Apache 2.0 HTTP Server www.apache.org
(See Note 2)
WEB411 Web Usuability Design Adobe Creative Suite 5 Web Premium or Newer - Full Install Bookstore
WRI115 Workplace Communication

Web cam with built-in microphone (required).

One of the following is require based on your operating system:

Mac Only: QuickTime Pro license required with Logitech QuickCam Pro only

Baker supports the following web cams and software based on your operating system:

Mac Only: Built-in Apple iSight web cam and iMovie, or Logitech Quickcam Vision Pro and Quicktime Pro

Windows Only: Logitech B910 Web cam

All of these are available from the Bookstore.

Note 1
The MSDNAA program is a method for students to obtain Microsoft development applications. Students in courses that are eligible for the MSDNAA program will have access to MSDNAA module through the Baker College tab within Blackboard.

Note 2
Software is available for free from the site noted. There may be a registration process.

Note 3
You may purchase individual versions of the these products from another source, but you may be required to purchase other software from these packages later on in the program. We suggest that you purchase the entire studio or suite initially (available from the Bookstore), as purchasing the software individually will cost much more.

Constitution Day

On May 24, 2005, the U.S. Department of Education released a Notice of Implementation, announcing that all educational institutions receiving federal funding must provide an educational program pertaining to the United States Constitution on September 17 of each year commemorating the September 17, 1787 signing of the U.S. Constitution.

Senator Robert C. Byrd, a West Virginia Democrat and the former United States Congress unofficial Constitutional scholar, believed that American primary, secondary, and post-secondary students lacked significant knowledge regarding the United States Constitution. In December 2004, Senator Byrd offered an amendment that was passed by both the United States House of Representatives and the United States Senate in attempt to increase Constitutional knowledge.

We have provided several resources below to increase awareness and appreciation for Constitution Day and the United States Constitution:

 
Contact Us

At Baker, our Academic Office is designed to meet all of your academic concerns. Our counselors are trained to help you achieve your educational objectives. If you are in need of academic, career, or personal counseling we provide you with the appropriate information and resources to help achieve your academic goals.

If you are looking for transcripts or other academic records, our registrars are ready to help. They are available for consultation regarding changing your program and other course registration concerns.

(231) 777-5200
acad-mu@baker.edu

Faculty Directory

This document provides a complete list of Baker faculty, organized by campus in alphabetical order.

To search for a specific faculty member/campus/word:

  1. Download and save the file to your computer.
  2. Open the file and hold the CNTL button and F key, and enter the word you wish to search for.
  3. The document will jump to the first instance of the word in the document. 
  4. You can use the up/down arrow keys to jump to each instance in the document.

Download the Faculty List [PDF 844KB]

Full Program List
Full Course List
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ABT 151
5 Quarter Hours

Covers the safety precautions in welding and cutting. Besides MIG welding, TIG, oxyacetylene, resistance spot welding, and plasma cutting are included. Students learn the processes used in body repair. 15 hours of lecture and 70 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Autobody Technician.

Corequisite(s):
ABT 106.
MIG Welding5
ACC 121
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
INF 113
Fundamentals of Accounting I4
ACC 122
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of managerial accounting, including financial statement analysis, job order costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and use of other managerial decision-making tools.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121, INF 113
Fundamentals of Accounting II4
ACC 231
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the beneficial role technology plays in processing accounting information. Emphasis is placed on hands-on application utilizing QuickBooks. Specific topics studied include setting up company information, maintenance of accounts and records, journalizing and posting transactions, closing the books and creating financial statements, payroll reports, cost accounting, and inventory management.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241, INF 113
Computerized Accounting4
ACC 241
4 Quarter Hours

Completes the study of financial and managerial accounting fundamentals. Coverage includes a detail review of the accounting cycle, financial statement preparation, statement of cash flows, and detailed coverage of long-term liabilities and equity. Also, managerial topics of standard costing and activity-based costing are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 122
Accounting Concepts4
ACC 251
4 Quarter Hours

Studies all aspects of payroll operations, including personnel and payroll records, computations of wages and salaries, relevant laws and acts pertaining to payroll, preparation of payroll registers, recording of accounting entries, and preparation of payroll tax returns.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241
Payroll Accounting4
ACC 301
4 Quarter Hours

Begins an in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues relevant to presentation of financial information for use in external decision-making processes. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for a complex, classified balance sheet. Other topics include a review of the accounting cycle, preparation of financial statements, the conceptual framework, GAAP, and account reconciliation.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241 or ACC 291.
Intermediate Accounting I4
ACC 302
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for multi-step income statement. Other topics include reinforcement of the accounting cycle and the interrelatedness of the financial statements and how various accounts affect them.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 301
Intermediate Accounting II4
ACC 303
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the Intermediate series, this course expands on competencies gained through previous study while addressing the reporting and disclosure requirements for the Statement of Cash Flows. In addition, pensions and other unique transactions, events, and disclosures will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 302
Intermediate Accounting III4
ACC 312B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides in-depth coverage of fundamentals of federal taxation related to business entities, including C and S corporations and partnerships. Emphasis is placed on the application of tax laws to the preparation of federal tax and informational return for these entities.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121
Business Entities Taxation4
ACC 331A
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes costs for decision making, capital investment decisions, quantitative models for planning and control, and performance evaluation. Strategic control systems, using accounting data for internal decision making, and cost control are also emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 241
Cost Accounting4
ACC 341B
4 Quarter Hours

Provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of federal and state taxation related to individuals. Students will examine the federal tax system; research and apply tax law; and calculate gross income, deductions, and future tax liability. Tax planning for the individual will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121
Individual Taxation4
ACC 416
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the discipline of auditing, accounting systems, and internal controls in public and private sectors, as well as the auditing profession and the audit process. Topics covered will include audit reports, professional ethics, legal liability, responsibilities, audit evidence, and planning. Internal controls and risks are also introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 303
Auditing, Systems, and Controls I4
ACC 417
4 Quarter Hours

Applies the audit process to various transaction cycles. This course introduces the systems of controls and related analytic flow charting for each of the transaction cycles, as well as the test of controls and the substantive tests for each cycle. This course is a continuation of Auditing, Systems, and Controls I.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 416
Auditing, Systems, and Controls II4
ACC 431B
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the fundamental principles of accounting for governmental units, colleges, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will compare and contrast non-profit accounting processes with those of for-profit enterprises by evaluating the differing regulations for recording transactions, financial reporting, and revenue recognition as well as funding options and budgeting.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 302
Governmental and Non-Profit Accounting4
ACC 441
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform accounting functions related to the acquisition of a business, consolidated financial statements, and disclosure requirements for industry segments.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 303
Advanced Accounting4
AG 221
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the maintenance of gas and diesel engines, field machinery, tractor and power units, and shop equipment to include the fundamentals of gas and arc welding. Students will be exposed to the common implements and equipment used in the agriculture industry. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113, MTH 108
Agriculture Equipment and Tooling4
AST 102
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on an introduction to engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Computerized engine controls are reviewed as are ignition systems, fuel/air systems, and exhaust systems. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Performance I6
AST 103
6 Quarter Hours

Continues the examination of engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Emission controls, effects of ignition timing, analysis of exhaust gases, and advanced engine services are studied. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 102.
Engine Performance II6
AST 122
4 Quarter Hours

Continues coverage of engine failure analysis with a focus on diagnostic procedures. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of labs are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Repair II4
AST 211
4 Quarter Hours

Presents an overview of basic Hybrid theory and applications within an automobile. Topics covered but not limited to, introduction to Hybrid vehicles, Hybrid safety, Hybrid battery design and application, battery operated electric vehicles, mild and assist Hybrid technologies, full Hybrid applications and alternative fuel overview. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B. AST 113.
Introduction to Hybrid Vehicles4
AST 221A
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the design and operation of automotive brake systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair, to manufacturer specifications, of traditional and Anti Lock Brake Systems (ABS) as well as Traction Control Systems (TCS). Lab demonstrations and on-car repair provide a working knowledge of hydraulic systems, disc/drum machining, rebuilding, and power assist, as well as scan tool usage to repair ABS/TCS systems. 20 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106 , C or better in AST 111A .
Automotive Brake Service6
AST 231A
6 Quarter Hours

Examines front and rear drive vehicles and the suspension and drive system for each. Steering mechanisms and suspension components for both automatic and manual drives are discussed as are alignment techniques. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A.
Automotive Suspension/Steering6
AST 241A
6 Quarter Hours

Covers automotive heating and air conditioning system theories, troubleshooting, and servicing. Proper refrigerant recovery, recycling, storage, and use of recharging equipment will also be covered. Students will be made aware of recent environmental concerns relevant to coolant and refrigeration. In addition, basic shop safety and safe use of recycling equipment will be discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A.
Heating/Air Conditioning6
AST 251
8 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the front-wheel drive transaxle and components. Transaxle fundamentals and operation will be reviewed as well as common faults and servicing procedures. 40 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 101 or C or better in AST 121.
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle8
AST 261
6 Quarter Hours

Investigates the manual drive train and major components. Transmissions, drive shafts, differentials, and drive axles are examined. Diagnosis and troubleshooting are discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B, C or better in AST 121.
Manual Drive Train and Axles6
BPA 111
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic principles of baking. Through hands-on experience students learn the identification of bakery tools and equipment, proper weighing and scaling of ingredients, and basic mixing methods. Students will learn to prepare basic breads, doughs, and starters along with choux products and pies. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 100, C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Baking Techniques I6
BPA 112
6 Quarter Hours

Continues from BPA 111 and focuses on the production and theory of baked goods such as flat breads, hard crusted breads, laminated doughs, puff pastry and specialty breads in a lab and lecture format. This course continues a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 111
Baking Techniques II6
BPA 151
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic techniques used in pastry production. Through extensive hands-on labs, students will focus on the preparations involved with cake batters, foams, mousses, fillings, meringues, buttercreams, and Bavarian creams. Students will also focus on assembly and decoration of European cakes, basic glazing and icing techniques, syrup preparation and shortdough applications.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 112
Pastry Techniques I6
BPA 152
6 Quarter Hours

Provides a focused, hands-on, comprehensive study of the techniques used in the production of International pastries, contemporary cakes, and restaurant cakes. Students will also utilize techniques in the design and layout of Charlottes and preparation of entremets and bombes.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 151
Pastry Techniques II6
BPA 153
6 Quarter Hours

Expands on the concepts and skills from Pastry Techniques II, with a continuation of techniques used for further applications. Students will focus on the design and assembly of wedding cakes, showpiece cakes and special occasion cakes as well as the building methods and techniques used for showpiece cakes. Students will be introduced to the advanced skills used in sugar work, rolled, colored and formed gum paste, fondant and modeling chocolate pastes.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 152
Pastry Techniques III6
BPA 221
6 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth introduction into the production of various pastries. Students focus on the skills and knowledge needed to produce tarts, petit fours, tea pastries, mignardise, molded mousses, napoleons, cream horns, Baklava and other pastries for sweet tables.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 251 or BPA 251A.
Advanced Confectionary Arts I6
BPA 222
6 Quarter Hours

Provides students the hands-on experience in the production and preparation of jellies, candies, cordials, crystallized fruits, sugared nuts, ganaches and other confectionary fillings for bonbons and truffles. Students will learn proper chocolate tempering techniques, confectionary mold preparation, cocoa butter painting and spraying.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 221
Advanced Confectionary Arts II6
BPA 223
6 Quarter Hours

Examines advanced confectionary production skills in the design and building of chocolate showpieces. Students will also utilize the techniques used in blown, pulled, and poured sugar showpieces and decorations, packed sugar and pastillage décor. The culmination of student knowledge will be exhibited with the design, fabrication and assembly of competition chocolate and sugar centerpieces.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 222
Advanced Confectionary Arts III6
BPA 251A
6 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes preparing students in a working production environment. Students will focus on plated desserts for restaurant and banquet work, hot and cold desserts, trios, deconstructed desserts, samplers and ice creams. Students will develop proper plating and service selections, color, texture, height and focal point balance. Plate presentations of simple and complex desserts will be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 151, BPA 152
Cafe and Restaurant Production6
BUS 211
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the data analysis process and the role of business decision making.  Explores qualitative and quantitative data, data vs. information, data research, relevance, validity, business intelligence tools, ethical and legal implications of data analysis, data integrity, primary and secondary data, MAIP (Measurement Analysis, Interpretation Presentation) and ethical and legal implications of data analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
Bachelor of Digital Media Technology majors: ENG 101, MKT 111B, MTH 111. Bachelor of Information Systems majors: ENG 101, MGT 101, MTH 108. All other majors: ENG 101, MGT 101, MKT 111B, MTH 108
Business Analytics4
BUS 572
4 Quarter Hours

Evaluates a variety of human resource issues facing corporations and businesses today. These include employee development, performance appraisal systems, job design, hiring and dismissal processes, career management strategies, legal issues, morale monitoring, domestic and global labor market problems, as well as how cultural and economic factors influence the effectiveness of human resource management.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Human Resource Management4
BUS 615
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an understanding of individuals, groups, and organizations as a whole. This course considers such topics as alignment of people within an organization, as well as techniques for these individuals to manage and lead more effectively. This course will also discuss how technology, the Internet, globalism, and virtual teaming are impacting the work environment today.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
Human Behavior Management of Organizations4
BUS 660
4 Quarter Hours

Concentrates on the marketing concept and its impact on the strategic decision-making process of the firm. This course emphasizes planning and managing marketing activities of multi-product firms and provides an understanding of the fundamental issues which influence marketing decisions. The specifics of implementing a marketing plan are discussed. In addition, the effects of the global marketplace and sources of marketing research are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BUS 678
The Marketing Environment4
BUS 678
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the use of data collection and analysis in business environments to facilitate decision making. Research designs will be addressed so that students can ask and answer specific questions. Students will learn to properly use basic descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will offer an applications-oriented perspective to conducting and critically evaluating primary research.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CGS 501
Research and Statistics for Managers4
CE 321
4 Quarter Hours

Covers design of concrete and steel bridges in accordance with the latest AASHTO specifications; understanding of theoretical background behind the codes such as risk and reliability concepts; load rating of bridges, and hands-on bridge design using computer software and hand calculations.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Design of Bridges4
CE 325
4 Quarter Hours

Describes principles of design and practice for rural and urban highway facilities and airport installations; design criteria and controls, capacity analysis, cross-section selection, design of horizontal and vertical alignment, intersections, interchanges and computer applications to design problems.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Geometric Design of Highways and Airports4
CE 351
4 Quarter Hours

Covers the analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete structural elements; full and partial pre-stressing; service ability and strength requirements; code criteria for bridges, buildings, and other structures.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Pre-Stressed Concrete Design4
CE 355
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses basic principles of mechanics, elasticity, and failure as applied to wood; design methods and specifications governing the design of sawn lumber, plywood, and glulam timber structures and structural components.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Structural Timber Design4
CE 358
4 Quarter Hours

Covers flexible and rigid pavement design procedures; subgrade, base, and surfacing characteristics; loads; stresses in pavement systems; material characterization; pavement response models; pavement performance models; structural design systems; effects of natural, forces; and construction practices. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Pavement Design4
CE 371
4 Quarter Hours

Presents fundamentals of geotechnics applied to design and analysis of shallow foundations, excavations, retaining structures, and slopes; selected topics on soil improvement and vibration; emphasis on computer utilization.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Geotechnical Engineering4
CE 385
4 Quarter Hours

Covers history, economics, and traffic characteristics of transportation systems; planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of air, highway, pipeline, rail, and water transportation facilities-vehicles, guide-ways, and terminals.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312
Transportation Engineering4
CE 415
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water movement from arrival on land surface until it reaches the sea overland; concept of frequency, maximum probable runoff of rainfall, mass curves, and other statistical methods of hydrologic engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341
Hydrology4
CE 421
4 Quarter Hours

Presents steady and unsteady flow in pipelines and pipe networks; analysis of fluid flow in open channel systems; design of pipelines, drainage facilities, and water supply networks.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341
Hydraulics4
CE 431
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water quality criteria, water treatment processes: physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes, sludge processing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Water Treatment Principles4
CE 435
4 Quarter Hours

Presents water processing and distribution, wastewater collection systems - management, operation and maintenance, advanced wastewater treatment processes, water reuse, design of sanitary sewers.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Wastewater Collection Systems4
CE 438
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses environmental laws and regulations; solid waste sources, composition and characteristics; properties of municipal solid waste, processing technologies, storage, transportation and disposal, management of landfills, materials recovery and recycling.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361
Solid Waste Principles4
CIS 119A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamentals of computer operations, control language, and file design in the iSeries environment.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 101 or INF 114A or NET 101.
iSeries CL and File Design4
CIS 132A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces program design and development using the RPG IV language. Students will analyze business problems and prepare program definitions as a basis for computerized solutions to those problems. Students interested in accounting applications are encouraged to choose this language option.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 119A
RPG IV4
CIS 211
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the elements of establishing superior information technology service and support. Focus is on interdepartmental cooperation. Customer contact skills including listening, courtesy, conflict management, problem solving, decision making, ethics, follow-up, communications, and user training are covered to enhance the image of the business with internal and external customers.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 201
CSS 211
Information Technology Customer Service and Support4
CIS 233A
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on advanced language features using the RPG IV language. Students are also introduced to the RPG II and RPG III languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 132A
Advanced RPG IV4
CIS 251
4 Quarter Hours

Presents traditional methodologies of system analysis, design, and implementation along with recent developments in the field providing a total approach to information systems development. This course focuses on how to develop information systems in an engineered, disciplined manner utilizing real-world situations and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
One level of a programming language or Junior status.
Systems Development Methods4
CIS 302A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an intermediate level of study of personal and/or business database applications including relational database structure and theory, the structure and maintenance of tables, queries, forms, and reports, and an introduction to macros and switchboards.

Prerequisite(s):
INF 114A.
Intermediate Database Management4
CIS 310
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111
Visual BASIC4
CIS 311
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates concepts learned in CIS310 and CIS311.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 310
Advanced Visual BASIC4
CIS 404
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of processor function and system design. Students will evaluate the performance of a given microprocessor using common benchmarks, analyze instruction sets in HLL, RISC, and CISC architectures, and expand their understanding of binary operations and related impact on ALU design. Students will research and compare performance and design factors in parallel, pipelined, and multiprocessor designs; analyze branch prediction impact on program design; and evaluate the effectiveness of hierarchical memory designs. Throughout this course students will engage in periodic research on various topics and will also complete an independent, comprehensive, in-depth analysis of an instructor-approved topic in high performance computer architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 340
CIS 303A or EET 226A.
Advanced Computer Architecture4
CIS 421B
4 Quarter Hours

Exposes students to database administration and the duties of a database administrator (DBA) to include database monitoring, backup and recovery, troubleshooting, and tuning for reliability and performance. Students will install, configure, and maintain an RDBMS including security, backup and recovery operations, and performance tuning.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A or CIS 331.
Database Administration I4
CIS 422
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the database administration tasks introduced in CIS 421B with a focus on backup and recovery tools and techniques, archiving, loading and transporting data, network administration, and server-side and client-side configuration.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 421B
Database Administration II4
CS 101
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students an overview of the computer science profession. The course will focus on topics such as history, careers, programming languages, operating systems, databases, and relationship of mathematical concepts.

In the following programs: Computer Programming, Computer Science, Game Software Development, Mobile Application Software Engineering

Principles of Computer Science4
CS 111
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to programming concepts such as logic and flow charting as well as some basic programming techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
Any INF course or CS 101 or EGR 111 or NET 101, MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Introduction to Programming4
CS 201
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the elements of global communication, networking, cloud computing, Internet programming, and programming for mobile devices. Students will experience working as a team to integrate technology used for networking on the Internet to support various users.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 101, CS 111
Net-centric Computing4
CS 241
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to using the JAVA programming language for developing applications. This is the first of two JAVA programming courses. The use of JAVA in Web-based client and server programming is also covered.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111 or one level of a programming language.
Java Programming4
CS 242
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 241
Advanced Java Programming4
CS 346
4 Quarter Hours

Examines issues related to security from a software developer point of view. Topics include a review of security breaches related to commercial software as well as hands-on activities focused on adding security-related features or debugging security-related problems in an application.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 231
Programming for Security4
CS 391
4 Quarter Hours

Explores current and past research conducted in the field of computer science. Students will engage in a research project of personal interest.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 401
Junior status.
Research in Computer Science4
CS 406
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a real-world opportunity for students to build a unique basic operating system for a platform of their choice.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 404, CS 322
Operating System Development4
CS 422A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the ability to create and maintain database objects to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. In addition, students will write queries to retrieve, summarize, and modify data using joins and subqueries. Students will learn how to create and execute stored procedures and functions. This course also introduces participants to database triggers.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 331, CS 111
Database Programming I4
CS 423
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the database programming tasks introduced in CS 422A with a focus on creating custom forms and reports, using advanced debugging techniques, and integrating database applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 422A
Database Programming II4
CSC 221B
8 Quarter Hours

Describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. Students learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPv2, single-area and multi-area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 121B.
Routing and Switching Essentials8
CSC 222
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to sit for the Cisco Wireless LAN Support Specialist exam (Cisco #642-582 WLANFE). After completing this Cisco Academy course students will be able to design, configure and maintain enterprise-class WLANs and building-to-building wireless bridges. This course focuses on a comprehensive overview of WLAN radio technologies (802.11a,b and g) and topologies, products and solutions, site surveys, resilient WLAN design, and WLAN Security (802.1x, EAP, LEAP, WEP, SSID). Labs focus on wireless access point configuration and bridging applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 221A
Cisco Wireless Networking4
CSC 223
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to sit for the Cisco Voice Over IP exam (Cisco #642-432 CVOICE). This course examines technologies that carry voice communications over an IP network, including digitization and packetization of voice and fax streams over packet and cell-based networks (FR and ATM). VoIP standards and protocols such as SIP and H.323 are addressed. QoS, traffic aggregation issues, bandwidth management and network assessment are also investigated. The major challenges of VoIP development, implementation, and major VoIP product development trends will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 222
Cisco Voice Networking4
CSC 231B
8 Quarter Hours

Describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a larger and more complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, STP, and VTP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement DHCP and DNS operations in a network.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 221B
Scaling Networks8
CSC 241A
8 Quarter Hours

Discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. The course enables students to understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students learn how to configure and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement IPSec and virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 231B
Connecting Networks8
CSC 301
4 Quarter Hours

Provides technology focused curriculum and is designed for networking and internetworking students pursuing opportunities in the health IT field. This course is designed for Cisco Networking Academy (R) students who are looking for career-oriented, entry-level healthcare focused specialist skills. The curriculum should be used as a specialty (healthcare) supplement for the CCNA certification.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 231A
Cisco Healthcare IT4
CUL 101
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the food service industry and program expectations. Students will discuss the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the food service industry. Responsible alcohol service will also be emphasized along with the certification testing (TIPs). Additionally, students will begin understanding the impact of sustainability measures in the food service industry. Minimum grade of 'C' or better is required.

Introduction to Food Service and Hospitality2
CUL 110
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students, in depth, to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explores both fresh and prepared foods and students learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.

Product Identification2
CUL 115A
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the math skills needed to calculate percentages, ratios, the metric system, conversion factors, yield tests, recipe conversion and recipe costing as they relate to the food service industry. Students will develop projections and analyze costs in yield tests and recipe pre-costing.

Culinary Math4
CUL 131B
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to food production practices governed by changing federal and state regulations. Topics to be covered include prevention of food-borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. This course utilizes the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® materials, prepares for and culminates with the administration of the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® Certification examination.

Food Safety2
CUL 141
2 Quarter Hours

Examines the basic concepts and principles of nutrition. In this course, students learn about basic nutrients, food labeling, nutritional principles, current issues in nutrition, and the application of nutritional principles to menu development. Students will also be involved in writing and nutritional analysis of recipes.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BPA 111 or C or better in CUL 151
Nutrition2
CUL 151
8 Quarter Hours

Gives a brief and intense introduction on kitchen safety, equipment, principles of basic food preparation and cooking techniques in lecture and lab format. Extensive hands-on training is provided for using cooking methods in the areas of dry heat cooking, moist heat cooking, tasting, kitchen equipment, knife skills, classical vegetable cuts, stock production, thickening agents, soup preparation, grand sauces, timing, station organization, palate development, and culinary French terms. The lecture for this course focuses on cooking principles, theory and the application of culinary skills in the kitchen. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 101, C or better in CUL 131B.
Corequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 115A
Culinary Skills I8
CUL 152
8 Quarter Hours

Continues from CUL151 and focuses on principles of food preparation and cooking techniques in lab and lecture format. Extensive hands-on training is provided for using basic cooking methods as they apply to specific products such as red meats, poultry, pork, game meats, fish, shellfish, vegetables, pasta, sauces, and soups. Expanded concepts of time lines and multi-tasking, station organization, and culinary French terms will continue. The lecture for this course focuses on advanced cooking principles, theory and the application of culinary skills in the kitchen. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 115A and CUL 151.
Culinary Skills II8
CUL 153
8 Quarter Hours

Applies the skills and theories from CUL152 and focuses on advanced principles of food preparation and cooking techniques in lab and lecture format. Students receive extensive hands-on training focusing on advanced and combination cooking methods for red meats, poultry, pork, shellfish, fish, vegetables, and game. Breakfast cookery, salads, canapes, production cooking, hot and cold sandwiches, plate presentation, and advanced techniques for starch and vegetable preparation, will also be developed. Lecture for this course will focus on the advanced cooking principles, theories, and application of culinary skills in the kitchen.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 152.
Culinary Skills III8
CUL 161
6 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the benefits of cooking under a timed regimen and enables them to learn and discover more about their abilities through instructor, self, and peer assessment. An extensive range of advanced techniques will be employed in concert with strict time management and extensive and continual evaluation. Upon completing this course students will have achieved an understanding working under pressure for practical cooking, interviews for employment, American Culinary Federation exams and other competitive cooking in a wide range of sanctioned competitions. A minimum grade of C or better is required.

Competitive Cooking6
CUL 201
8 Quarter Hours

Prepares the students for the innovation, creativity, speed, and multi-tasking abilities required in today's modern kitchen. The lab format for this class will offer students a real working kitchen environment in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's student-run, fine dining restaurant. An extensive range of advanced techniques, ingredients, and recipes illustrate the complex theories and applications. Upon completing this course, students will have achieved a high standard of quality and detail in culinary arts.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 153
Restaurant Techniques8
CUL 216
6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic techniques used in general baking and plated dessert production. Through extensive hands-on labs, students will focus on the preparations involved with yeast-leavened products, quick breads, American pies, cake batters, mousses, fillings, meringues, buttercreams, and Bavarian creams. Students will also focus on assembly and decoration of European cakes, basic glazing and icing techniques, syrup preparation, and classic and contemporary plated dessert applications. Students will be introduced to recipe and formula modification to create more beneficial baked goods and desserts. The concept of baker's percentage and proper selection of equipment and utensils for specific applications will be reinforced.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 131B, C or better in CUL 153
Baking for Culinary Students6
CUL 221
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the information and skills necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a foodservice establishment. Topics include the flow of goods, income statements, forecasting sales, and controlling labor and food costs. Students will also analyze the complete purchasing cycle of a restaurant, beginning with product and vendor selection and ending with actual orders.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 110, C or better in CUL 115A
Purchasing and Cost Control4
CUL 222A
8 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the applications of the principles of fine service and hospitality in an a la carte restaurant serving the public. This class, which will be held in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's restaurant. The course will emphasize customer service, wine and spirits, restaurant trends and sales, merchandising, and sales. Students study and participate in the fundamentals of reservation and point-of-sale systems, controlling inventory, merchandising products and services, managing costs, assuring high-quality service to all customers, and managing service. Students will take the Federation of Dining Room Professionals (R) certification examination for Certified Dining Room Associate.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 101 or TIPS Certification.
Table Service8
CUL 231A
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the three main areas of the cold kitchen: reception foods, plated appetizers, and buffet arrangements. Students learn to prepare hot and cold hors d'oeuvres, appetizers, forcemeats, pâtés, galantines, terrines, salads, and sausages. Curing, brining, and smoking techniques for meat, seafood, and poultry items will be practiced, along with contemporary styles of presenting food and preparing of buffets. Students will also have hands-on experience in the fabrication and aging of fresh and cured products.

Garde Manger6
DMD 131
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to raster-based editing software used to produce graphics for the web and print. Topics include basic image adjustment and retouching techniques as well as methods for manipulating, repairing, and combining images.

Prerequisite(s):
Any of the INF courses.
Introduction to Graphic Imaging4
DSL 151
4 Quarter Hours

Covers the theory and application of cutting and welding for heavy duty repair. Topics include gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, plasma arc cutting, and flame cutting techniques. 10 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Welding for Heavy Duty Repair4
DSL 211
4 Quarter Hours

Provides instruction for practice and safe operation of commercial vehicles for Diesel Service students. This course is designed for diesel service technicians who operate commercial vehicles for the purpose of service and diagnosis. Instruction will include pre-trip inspections, range driving, and on-road driving. A majority of class time is spent behind the wheel, however, some lab/classroom time is involved. Students will earn a minimum of 30 hours of driving time in both range and on-road settings.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 181
professional Driving Waiver, current TIP issued by Michigan, USDOT medical exam/drug screen.
CDL Preparation for Diesel Service Technician4
DSL 241
6 Quarter Hours

Combines heating and cooling of the truck cab (driver comfort), product refrigeration for freight industry, and passenger comfort for the bussing industry. Students learn to diagnose and repair vehicles and commercial heating/refrigeration systems. Topics include lubricants, compressor types, electrical and mechanical controls, refrigerant types and characteristics, as well as leak testing and repair. Includes lecture and hands-on experiences to assist in preparation for the State License exam for Automotive Heating/Air Conditioning as well as EPA 609 and EPA 608 certifications. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Heavy Duty Heating/Air Conditioning6
DSL 251
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on ADA and other systems used in the bussing industry. Topics and equipment covered include, but are not limited to, bus doors, ADA lifts, audio/video systems, passenger lighting, and comfort controls. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Auxiliary Systems4
DSL 261
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on manual transmission drive trains. Diagnosis, service and repair of manual transmissions, transfer boxes, clutches, and single and dual rear drive axles will be covered. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Heavy Duty Drive Trains6
DSL 285
4 Quarter Hours

Provides extensive safety training while addressing the installation, maintenance, and servicing of various types of power generation sets. Topics include a basic introduction to generators/alternators, voltage regulation, governors, engine/generator instrumentation and controls, generator protection, automatic transfer switches, sizing and servicing generator systems, and electronic switching components necessary in the generation and/or transmission of electric power. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 142, C or better in DSL 271.
Power Generation4
DSL 291
5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on maintenance, inspection, and repair of heavy equipment hydraulic systems. Topics and equipment include pumps, filtration, hoses and fittings, control valves, and actuators. 20 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
AST 112B or DSL 141, MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Hydraulics5
ECN 201
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics4
ECN 202
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Microeconomics4
ECN 301
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on economic topics of international trade theories including advantages, costs, and barriers to free trade; capital mobility; balance of payments; and foreign exchange markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 201
International Economics4
EET 111A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces electrical fundamentals, including nomenclature, symbols, SI units, and schematic diagrams. Covers conductors, voltage, current, resistance, and power. Uses Ohm's Law, Watt's Law, and Kirchhoff's Voltage Law to analyze series circuits and voltage dividers. Emphasizes hands-on lab experiments in building and measuring circuits using a breadboard, multimeter, and power supply.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 091 or satisfies developmental essential math concepts or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Electrical Technology4
EET 115D
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the study of electrical circuits using Ohm's, Watt's, and Kirchoff's Laws to analyze parallel, series-parallel, and ladder networks. Covers the Thevenin, Norton, and Superposition Theorems, and the loop current method of circuit analysis. Emphasizes hands-on lab experiments, the use of test and measurement equipment, and technical report writing. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EET 111A
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental essential math concepts or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 111
DC Circuits4
EET 136
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces digital logic, circuits, and systems. Covers number bases (binary, octal, decimal, hexadecimal), codes (2's complement, floating point), integer arithmetic, and logic functions. Uses Boolean algebra, DeMorgan's Laws, and Karnaugh maps to minimize logic functions. Surveys digital circuit parameters, and adders, comparators, encoders, decoders, multiplexers, demultiplexers, and parity generators.

Prerequisite(s):
EET 115D, MTH 111
Digital Circuits I4
EET 216
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of digital systems with sequential logic components. Covers S-R and D latches, D and J-K flip-flops, and memory structures. Surveys counters, frequency dividers, timers, one-shots, shift registers, Flash memory, static RAM, dynamic RAM, and interfacing. Emphasizes hands-on lab experiments, and includes one design project.

Prerequisite(s):
EET 136
Digital Circuits II4
EGR 395
4 Quarter Hours

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the dean.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 351
ME 341A, Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Research4
ELECT 111A
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Scientific Inquiry Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Scientific Inquiry Elective4
ELECT 121A
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective4
ELECT 131A
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 131B
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 141A
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Personal and Social Environments Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Personal and Social Environments Elective4
ELECT 141B
4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Personal and Social Environments Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Personal and Social Environments Elective4
EN 201
4 Quarter Hours

Explores what it means to be an entrepreneur. What is involved in creating a successful entrepreneurial venture? Characteristics and traits of successful entrepreneurs are explained.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 101, MKT 111B.
Introduction to Entrepreneurship4
EN 211
4 Quarter Hours

Explores and considers the following: How do rules and regulations determine my actions as an entrepreneur, what role do Human Resources play in the success or failure of a small business, and how does my relationship with my employees impact my business.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 101, MKT 111B.
Human Resources for Entrepreneurs4
EN 221
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the all-important aspect of financial management, at the conclusion of the course students will understand and address the following issues as it pertains to their business concept: Cash management, financial aspects of business growth, budget process, sustainable cash flow, importance of ethics in financial relations.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 122
Finance for Entrepreneurs4
EN 231
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the idea that no matter how great an idea or concept is, it will fail without good marketing. This course is designed to help address the following: Development of a competitive edge, proposal to successfully market a business, overcome any obstacles in marketing a business, communication of value to the consumer, importance of image and branding; and the processes to provide the fundamental information and knowledge needed to produce a viable marketing plan.

Prerequisite(s):
EN 201, EN 211
Marketing for Entrepreneurs4
EN 241
4 Quarter Hours

Establishes a framework for an entrepreneur to manage day-to-day operations of their business. The course will be centered on: Planning, creating operational effectiveness, developing the customer experience, regulatory compliance, and effective organizational leadership skills.

Prerequisite(s):
EN 231
Managing Entrepreneurial Operations4
EN 291
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of a presentation ready business plan and have the opportunity to present their plan. This course will draw on the information and work done in all previous EN courses. This is the capstone course in the series.

Corequisite(s):
EN 241
Developing the Business Plan4
ENG 101
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
ENG 221
4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis4
ENG 231
4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Language and Culture4
ENG 311
4 Quarter Hours

Expands students' writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Creative Writing4
ENG 411
4 Quarter Hours

Studies theory of behavior in communication in general and in mass media in particular. This course also focuses on the design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communication with an emphasis on the effects that various media have on consumers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Foundations of Mass Communication4
FBM 111
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a history, anthropology, and culture studies class about food and beverage, its implications for politics, religion, economics, health and well-being, and esthetics.

The History and Culture of Eating and Drinking4
FBM 121
6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the fundamental supervisory skills required in the food and beverage management industry. Students will be taught how to identify the quality of food products, how to understand, create, and monitor sanitation systems. Students will participate in the identification and operation of basic kitchen equipment and small wares, identify and evaluate quality and presentation of a la care and banquet food items. During the class students will develop an understanding of skills required to recruit, interview, and hire chefs and kitchen staff, and develop critical thinking skills necessary to address common kitchen issues.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 131B
Culinary Fundamentals6
FBM 131
4 Quarter Hours

Lays the foundation on which the student's ability to manage the daily financial health of his/her restaurant is built. Basic accounting skills of sales and cost management are practiced within a restaurant structured financial system. The course utilizes QuickBooks, a user friendly bookkeeping system which is the basis of many small and large business back office operation.

Accounting for Food and Beverage Managers4
FBM 151
4 Quarter Hours

Gives students an understanding of the various forms of alcohol along with the tools needed to handle difficult situations in regards to a restaurant or bar patron's consumption of alcohol. Topics that are covered include identifying and classifying spirits, liquor liability, intoxication rate factors, acceptable forms of identification, and documentation of alcohol related incidents.

Liquor Identification and Liabilities4
FBM 221
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to all aspects of menu development. Students will develop menus start to finish, including, analyzing a business, creating a concept that is appropriate to a theme of a restaurant, and developing a menu appropriate to the theme. Students will utilize industry specific mathematics to cost out menus, and analyze existing menus. Students will learn to analyze a balanced menu based on food cost, labor cost, operating expenses, and extensive market research.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in BPA 152 or C or better in CUL 153 or C or better in FBM 261
Menu Planning and Analysis4
FBM 231
4 Quarter Hours

Gives students the opportunity to apply accounting systems and principles that were taught in FBM131, accounting for food and beverage managers. The class begins with an overview of QuickBooks back office accounting management and how accounting is used to collect and organize data on a shift by shift basis. Principal areas of focus are those systems which most directly impact on, and measure effective shift management. Examples include daily sales recording and breakdown by revenue center, labor scheduling from budget, shift by shift performance review of sales, labor, food and beverage costs, weekly cost center review, proactive management, and action plan creation.

Hospitality Financial Management4
FBM 241
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of a food service operation plan and essential skills needed to manage a variety of food service operations. Emphasis is given on strong leadership skill development, developing front of the house and back of the house teams, staffing, labor cost, human resource management, and creating restaurant long term plans.

Food and Beverage Management4
FBM 251
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the subject of wine, from vineyard to bottle and bottle to table. This survey course explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, assigned readings, viewings, and projects. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate basic knowledge of grape growing and wine making; recognition of the main categories of wine, including grape varieties, wine styles and wine growing regions; identify wine attributes by taste; and understand general principles of wine pairing and wine service.

Introduction to Wine4
FBM 255
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces a variety of different beer styles and outlines proper service techniques. Specific examples of service techniques include pouring and serving draught beer, serving bottled beer, proper beer storage, and using beer glassware appropriately. Students in the class will also receive hands-on experience in brewing, brewing equipment, beer ingredients, and beer and food pairing; along with an understanding of normal beer flavors versus off-flavors using a problem solving approach to recognize flavor deterioration.

Beer Styles and Service4
FBM 261
6 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with a magnitude of drink recipes and drink mixing techniques. Students will not only be able to identify, but will also become comfortable creating classic and original cocktails in this class. This class also explores the world of bar management and supervision; including, but not limited to purchasing, receiving, storing, inventorying, and handling bar supplies and equipment. Bar Management and Mixology will also cultivate proper communication practices between guests, distributors, servers, bartenders, and managers.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in FBM 151
Bar Management and Mixology6
FBM 281
8 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an introductory learning experience in the essentials of food and beverage front of the house management. Focus is given to: guest needs and customer service, cost controls, marketing, forecasting, and focuses on teamwork while analyzing various management styles. Students will attend class lectures and experience day to day management activities in a supervised food service environment. Student must complete 16 hours of lab, 4 hours of lecture, and 4 hours of Blackboard contact each week.

Restaurant Operations8
FBM 331A
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the essentials of food service marketing and focuses on the nature of industry competition, and the importance of customer service. This course identifies how food service management can assess and best serve their target market and support the organization's mission. Marketing principles will be applied to the food service industry through an analysis of marketing mix, marketing strategy, and sales techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
Hospitality Marketing4
FBM 341
6 Quarter Hours

Provides a global perspective on wine growing and production regions of the world. Includes pairing wine and other spirits with food. Students will become familiarized with the service methods distinct to alcohol and spirits and how to responsibly enjoy them and the laws that govern them. The history, grape growing, fermentation, winemaking operations, and sociology of wine will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 251.
Wine and Viticulture6
FBM 351A
4 Quarter Hours

Provides analysis of banquet planning from initial customer contact to delivery of food and beverage. Focus is given on organizational communication, guest need assessment, cost control, facility layout, and learning ability to multi-task with awareness of all facets of foodservice operation functions.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 281, WRKCM 201
Banquet Meeting and Planning4
FBM 401
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of food service human resource management. Facilitates the process of evaluating employees within a hospitality organization through development of appraisal systems, measurement tools, and roles of training and development. Focus is also given on hospitality employment laws, management and labor relations, and social issues within the work environment.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 281
Hospitality Human Resource Management4
FBM 441
4 Quarter Hours

Presents growth and development of hospitality opportunities while focusing on present status and future trends of the food and lodging industry. Includes special problems of operating small and medium sized establishments. Introduces credit and account procedures, management of staff, marketing, advertising, and security, as well as; the personal attitudes, qualifications and ethics of ownership.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
FBM 131, FBM 231
Hospitality Ownership and Entrepreneurship4
FBM 451A
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes total food service operations management. Students will apply accounting principles to the analysis of financial data in food and beverage operations. Budgeting systems, restaurant profitability, and cost control measures will be covered with an eye toward implementing and building effective management and personnel cost control initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
FBM 131, FBM 231
Controlling and Analyzing Foodservice Operational Costs4
FIN 101
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a balanced exposure to development and understanding the various aspects involved in managing one's personal finance.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Personal Finance4
FIN 301A
4 Quarter Hours

Covers working capital management, capital budgeting issues, a study of the time value of money, financial statement analyses, valuation of financial instruments, term structure of interest rates, and analyses of short- and long-term capital markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 122
MTH 108 or MTH 111
Principles of Finance4
FIN 315
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the all-encompassing nature of pure risk on the individual, business, and society; illustrating ways in which risk management plans can be implemented. Exposure to this content enables students to deal with various situations where there is uncertainty about the outcome and that the possibility exists for an unfavorable outcome.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 301A
Risk Management4
FIN 325
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the monetary system; introduction to the financial markets; and regional and national banking institutions including thrifts, savings and loans, credit unions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, investment companies, and money center banks.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 301A
Banking and Financial Institutions4
FIN 341
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to credit analysis, credit bureaus, credit ratings, and to the differences between personal and commercial credit. Students receive exposure to how lines of credit are determined as well as various methods individuals and businesses can use to procure funds.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 301A
Credit Analysis and Commercial Lending4
FIN 355
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the development of modern financial markets with emphasis on the factors that determine interest rates, pricing mechanisms for fixed-income securities, and private and public raising of financial capital.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 301A
Financial Markets4
FIN 401
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of a financial portfolio including defining the purpose and the individual investments included within that portfolio to assess whether financial goals can/are being met. Students will work to specify realistic financial goals given available resources. Students will gain an awareness of the resources available and sources of income used to obtain the financial goals, as well as an understanding of the risk/reward ratio of each investment alternative.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 355
Personal Financial Planning4
FIN 451A
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to investing in non-domestic securities or assets as another way to diversify a portfolio or holdings. Students will explore the various risks--political, exchange rates, foreign taxation, and different reporting methods--that are inherent in international investing. Since foreign investment returns are not correlated with US returns, hedging and various market instabilities can offer unique opportunities for portfolio diversification and will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 401
International Financial Management4
FIN 461
4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with the various investment alternatives and examines the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students will be given the opportunity to assess and evaluate investment alternatives using various techniques including fundamental and technical analysis, risk/reward models, and diversification.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 401
Investment Management4
FIN 471
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the use of fundamental financial analysis and valuation techniques when evaluating the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flows statement. The focus of this course is on financial data that can be analyzed to assist in investment, commercial lending, or other economic decisions.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 451A, FIN 461
Financial Statement Analysis4
FLEX 1
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
FLEX 2
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
FLEX 3
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
FLEX 4
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
FLEX 5
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
FLEX 6
4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Flex Studies4
GEO 101B
4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
GEO 102B
4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and natural environment are studied, along with the historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography II4
HIS 301
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Women's Studies4
HIS 351
4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations from the period.

World History I4
HIS 352
4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from c.300 CE to c.1789 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History II4
HIS 353
4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from c.1789 CE to c.1914 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History III4
HIS 354
4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments from the twentieth century to the present, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History IV4
HIS 411
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development of emerging nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America with reference to theoretical perspectives such as globalization.

Emerging Nations4
HRM 215
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the challenges of a comprehensive staffing model that identifies all the key components of staffing, external influences, and staffing system management. Major areas covered are the staffing model, external influences (economic, laws and regulations), staffing strategy and planning, job analysis, measurement, external and internal recruitment, selection, decision making, and the final match.

Securing Human Resources4
HRM 225
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the various aspects of training and development of employees in the workforce. Covered topics include: orientation, strategic training, needs assessments, learning theories, new training technologies, employee career development, and career management.

Developing Human Resources4
HRM 291
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on material studied in previous associate degree level courses at Baker College. Students will evaluate and analyze current topics in HR through case analysis and through the development of a policy manual/employee handbook. This is the capstone course in the human resource management associate's degree program.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 215A, HRM 225A, HRM 300, HRM 315A
Human Resource Seminar4
HRM 300
4 Quarter Hours

Examines a variety of compensation methods and their relationships to organizational strategies, pay structures, and employee performance. Topics include total rewards, design of pay levels, benefit options, compensating special groups, cost management, and administration.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 225A
Compensating Human Resources4
HRM 315
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of how human resource management facilitates the process of how employees are evaluated within an organization through the development of appraisal systems, measurement tools, and the roles of feedback and coaching training and development. This course will also examine how the functions of human resources align with the organization's core values, goals and strategy while supporting an organization in the execution of its mission and vision and how to while measuring human resources effectiveness.

Evaluating Human Resources4
HRM 401
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to employment law and labor law for a non-legal professional in human resource management and/or labor relations.

Prerequisite(s):
LAW 211.
Human Resources and Employment Law4
HRM 435B
4 Quarter Hours

Examines how global human resource management practices within a global context is distinctive from domestic human resource management. Students will analyze the challenges that multinational corporations are confronted with, which include cultural, political, social, and legal issues; the level of managerial skill and education; technological development in the host country. Issues such as expatriation versus local management, selecting and preparing for international assignments, cultural adaptation at the individual and system level, and the influence of globalization on future HRM practices are also examined.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 291
International Human Resource Management4
HRM 491
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the way strategies can be formed and enacted in organizations, and on the internal and external environmental contexts from which human resource strategies emerge. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their analytical skills in organizational analysis and strategic thinking through case studies. Students will be provided with opportunities to synthesize managerial strategy issues with HRM processes, in a considered and reflective manner. This is the capstone course in the Human Resource Management program.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 435B. HRM 401.
Strategic Human Resource Management4
HSC 102
1 Quarter Hours

Provides information on adult and pediatric CPR, including two-rescuer scenarios and use of the bag-valve mask. This course provides training in foreign-body airway obstruction (conscious and unconscious), automated external defibrillation (includes child AED update), special resuscitation situations, and other cardiopulmonary emergencies at the professional rescuer level. This is an American Heart Association course and provides training in basic first-aid procedures and a module on environmental emergencies. Students will attain Heartsaver First Aid and AHA Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certifications upon successful completion of required components and tests.

BLS Provider Training and First Aid1
HSC 104
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MED 103, C or better in SCI 102C, and Program Director / Dean approval.
Introduction to Disease4
HSC 111
4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

Introduction to Healthcare4
HSC 161
2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the legal, ethical, and bioethical aspects of medical practice. Included are licensure, professional liability, quality assurance, and risk management.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance into the Program.
Legal Concepts to Medical Practice2
HUM 101B
4 Quarter Hours

Enhances the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)4
HUM 102B
4 Quarter Hours

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Baroque period to the present are studied.

Art and Architecture II (Baroque to Modern)4
HUM 353
2 Quarter Hours

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

Corequisite(s):
HUM357 Music Appreciation (2 QH) must be taken simultaneously.
Art Appreciation2
HUM 357
2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

Corequisite(s):
HUM353 Art Appreciation (2 QH) must be taken simultaneously.
Music Appreciation2
HUM 401A
4 Quarter Hours

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Philosophy of Ethics4
INF 112
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Word Processing2
INF 113
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 114A
2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Introduction to Database Applications2
INF 121
2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 141A
2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the use of Microsoft PowerPoint to develop computer-based presentations. Topics include creating slides, handouts, speaker's notes, and outlines as well as the use of PowerPoint Wizards and Templates.

Microsoft PowerPoint2
INF 161
2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
ITP 111
4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
ITP 112
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills for communicating with Deaf people who sign. Emphasis is on expansion of ASL vocabulary and continued development of expressive and receptive sign skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
American Sign Language II4
ITS 111
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a background in information security, security management, and the technical components of security. Students will be given an overview of the entire field of information security: the history, the terminology, and the management aspects of information security programs with sufficient detail to facilitate an understanding of information security systems and their management.

Introduction to Information System Security4
ITS 221
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the major network security tools in use today, with the idea that firewalls are most effective when backed by thoughtful security planning, well-designed security policies, and integrated support from anti-virus software, intrusion detection systems, and related tools. Coverage includes packet filtering, authentication, proxy servers, encryption, bastion hosts, virtual private networks (VPNs), log file maintenance, and intrusion detection systems. Students will also learn about relevant National Institute of Standards and Technology guidelines that are used by businesses and information technology professionals.

Prerequisite(s):
CSS 211.
VPN/Firewall Architecture and Management I4
ITS 222
4 Quarter Hours

Continues coverage from ITS221 and provides realistic projects and cases incorporating cutting-edge technology and current trends, giving students the opportunity to hone and apply the knowledge and skills they will need as working professionals. Provides students with an understanding of key concepts and skills necessary to install and manage a firewalled network, how to gain maximum security from the firewall, and how to resolve firewall performance issues.

Prerequisite(s):
CSS 221.
VPN/Firewall Architecture and Management II4
ITS 341
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces scripting language and its environment. Students will build scripts and utilities to automate system tasks and create powerful system management tools to handle the day-to-day tasks that drive a system administrator's life. The course covers batch scripting, secure scripting and string processing. Students will also learn how to automate the scripting of security related functions.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 205, MNP 221
Scripting for Network Administrators4
LAW 211
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an introduction to the legal issues inherent in dynamic business environments. Topics covered include the legal system, including an examination of constitutional law; business torts; contracts; intellectual property; criminal law; and the ethical considerations for business decision making.

Business Law4
LIT 301
4 Quarter Hours

Studies contemporary authors who may be classified as modern or postmodern; figures include principal ethnic and minority writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Contemporary Literature4
LIT 331
4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from colonial times (1600) through the Civil War (1865). American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
American Literature I4
LIT 332
4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from Reconstruction (1865) to the present. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
American Literature II4
LUX 211
4 Quarter Hours

Explores shell programming issues in a Linux/UNIX environment. Students should understand basic commands for file manipulation and directory navigation. While addressing the existence of other shells, this course focuses on the BASH shell. The topics covered include basic OS concepts and script writing, file System structure, debugging techniques, control structures (decision/looping), functions, arrays, and text processing.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 205
Shell Programming4
LUX 261
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces system administration for individual or local Linux/Unix systems. The topics will cover the essential duties of a Linux/Unix system administrator including: booting and shutting down systems, user administration, root system powers, file system creation and administration, devices and drivers, adding hardware, backing up/restoring file systems, system log files, and kernel modifications. Students will demonstrate the ability to utilize shell scripts to automate system administration and troubleshooting problems.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 211
Corequisite(s):
NET 102
Linux/Unix System Administration I4
LUX 262
4 Quarter Hours

Continues system administration for Linux Workstations. The topics will cover those of a junior to intermediate level Linux system administrator including: Dynamic host configuration, domain name system, network file systems, remote administration, sharing with windows clients, e-mail, Web, FTP, and proxy servers.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 261
Linux/Unix System Administration II4
LUX 263
4 Quarter Hours

Concludes system administration for Linux Workstations. The topics will cover the duties of an intermediate level Linux system administrator including: Customizing system startup, file system repair, compiling custom kernels, routing, and multiple security techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 262
Linux/Unix System Administration III4
ME 305
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to finite element theory, problem formulation, and computer analysis. The concepts covered are isoparametric formulation, element stiffness and load matrices, global stiffness matrix, governing equations, boundary conditions, temperature effects, pre- and post-processing, scalar field, deformation and stress analysis, commercial FEA software, and application in 1D-, 2D-, and 3D-models.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 211, MTH 261
Introduction to FEA4
ME 306
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of the finite element method including a deep dive into applications. Element types and modeling techniques will be explored, followed by analysis types and convergence. Modeling assumptions will be discussed in terms of their effect on solution development and accuracy.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 211, ME 305, MTH 261
Intermediate FEA4
ME 311
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to bioengineering related topics such as biomechanics, and biomaterials used in medical applications. Students will use the principles of kinematics and dynamics to analyze and interpret a variety of human body movements. Includes a survey of biomaterials including properties and specific medical applications.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 215 or SCI 251.
Biomechanics and Biomaterials4
ME 331
4 Quarter Hours

Covers classical thermodynamics. This course includes the properties of a pure substance; work, heat, energy, enthalpy, and entropy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; and power and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 143, SCI 253
Thermodynamics4
ME 342
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of fluid mechanics. This course includes the differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, surface resistance, flow in conduits, flow measurement, turbomachinery, and an introduction to computational fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 341A.
Fluid Mechanics II4
ME 350
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the natural laws of work. This topic deals with the minimization of the hazards and maximization of the efficiency of the work system in which the human is a part. The scope of this system can be as simple as a carpenter and a hammer or as complicated as the control system of a nuclear power plant.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 105, ME 201
Ergonomics for Engineers4
ME 381
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces mechatronics, the integration of mechanical design, electronics, control systems, and computer science to create better products, systems, and processes. Topics include mechanisms, sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, dynamic system modeling, automation, robotics, and other applications. Experimental practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 361
EE 311
Mechatronics4
ME 425
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the physics of noise, vibration, and harshness and the relationship between the three, as well as, their implications. This course will also cover development in vehicle and component noise and vibration control, analysis, subjective evaluation acoustic material, and measurement as applied to mobility industry.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 421
Noise, Vibration, and Harshness4
ME 495
4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics4
ME 495A
4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering. Students will practice Computer Aided Engineering using the Solidworks software package.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics: CAE with Solidworks4
ME 495B
4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering. Students explore the status of various alternative energy strategies and their related engineering ramifications.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics: Alternative Energies4
MED 103
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology4
MED 106
1 Quarter Hours

Introduces the concept of medical and surgical asepsis and infection control. This course includes Universal Precautions and OSHA Regulations. 5 hours of lecture and 10 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MED 103, Acceptance in the program.
Asepsis1
MGT 101
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a basic understanding of many aspects of business through an overview of the changing business environment, the roles of small businesses, entrepreneurs, and the importance of customer relations, management, and marketing. Financial management, accounting and banking will also be discussed.

Introduction to Business4
MGT 111
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the role that professional management behavior plays in the success of any organization. Emphasis is on the importance of customer service, ethical behavior, and effective communication, building relationships and recognizing diversity. Students will participate in role plays, team projects, networking assignments, and case studies.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
MGT 101.
Professional Management Behavior4
MGT 141
4 Quarter Hours

Provides an understanding of leadership styles, the management process, organizational resources and how to use them, various motivation/behavior theories, conflict management, and implementing and supporting change. Students will compare different leadership styles and apply them in case scenarios, role plays and other group/team activities involving topics such as: change, employee behavior, conflict, ethics, decision-making, and managing resources.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
MGT 101.
Principles of Management4
MGT 212A
4 Quarter Hours

Explores a variety of human resources management issues. Students are introduced to the tactical and strategic role of the human resource function within an organization. Examines coaching, employee performance measurements, team-based/team development, accountability, employment procedures, and discipline.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101, MGT 101.
Staffing and Performance Management4
MGT 221
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of the role analytics plays in business decision making. Students will apply analytics in various decision-making situations involved with operations, planning/control projects, and quality management initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 211 or MGT 121
Applied Business Analytics4
MGT 222
4 Quarter Hours

Discusses a variety of significant issues related to business and organizational leadership in today's dynamic, customer-driven, global economy. This course focuses on the challenges of change and management's response to change, the diversity of management methods, and managing strategies for the future. As a seminar, this course uses peer teaching and learning approaches, involves group learning experiences in a team environment, requires practical application of concepts, and includes research and case studies. This course culminates the associate's degree of management.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 211 or MGT 221 or MGT 241.
Management Seminar4
MGT 311
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the effects of environmental change on organizations and organizational systems. Emphasis is placed on sustaining change by building organizational capability involving human resources and organizational practices which have the potential to sustain the organization's ability to continually adapt in a dynamic environment. Topics include organizational behavior, groups and interpersonal influence, strategic interventions, approaches to systems, system analysis and design, implementation techniques, monitoring, complementary human assets, contextual relations, and linkages. Specific examples are drawn from industry experience and models.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Organizational Change4
MGT 321
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the role of information systems in organizations. This course covers the major types of information systems and the impact that these systems have on organizations, including how information systems improve decision making and support the business strategy. Information system development and planning are covered, as well as information security and the challenges of future technology changes.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Management Information Systems4
MGT 331
4 Quarter Hours

Examines a variety of leadership and management styles and their application. Emphasis is on problem-solving, collaboration, managing resources, ethical behavior, using appropriate leadership style, team-building, and characteristics of effective leadership.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 222
Applied Leadership4
MGT 341
4 Quarter Hours

Examines factors that shape the cultural diversity on a global business. Students develop the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate management techniques to effectively use diversity as an asset of the organization. Emphasis is on culture, demographic trends, environmental issues, social issues, economic issues and ethical concerns in a global business scenario.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 222
Globalization and Diversity4
MGT 422
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to a broad scope and major strategic, tactical, and operational decisions of operations management, as well as important interactions with other functional areas. Emphasis is on a conceptual understanding of the operations function and includes the following topics: product/process selection and design, facility location and layout, capacity, material management, inventory planning and control, and quality management.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 311
MTH 109 or MTH 112A.
Operations Management4
MGT 431
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise. By integrating functional courses into a balanced overall view, this course focuses upon the interaction and interrelationships of an organization with its environment. This is the capstone course in the Bachelor of Business Administration in Management program.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 311, MGT 321
Strategic Management4
MIS 121A
4 Quarter Hours

Defines the role of the medical insurance specialist. Students will be introduced to reimbursement terminology, coding systems, major insurance programs, governmental agencies, and the role of the various members of the healthcare team as related to medical reimbursement. The student will study current events related to medical reimbursement

Prerequisite(s):
MED 103.
Introduction to Medical Reimbursement4
MKT 111B
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the essentials of an introductory course than can be either a survey course or a prerequisite to more advanced marketing studies. Study includes product identification, positioning and pricing strategies, consumer need identification and making the connection between consumer needs and product advertising, basic distribution strategies, and some of the decision-making tools at the disposal of the marketing manager. This course is recommended as a first course for marketing majors.

Principles of Marketing4
MKT 131
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the steps of the selling process from beginning to end, with a focus on organization and a systematic approach. Topics include communication, the strategic selling process, sales careers, understanding your customer, and using technology.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
MGT 101, MKT 111B.
Personal Selling4
MKT 201
4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with the basic principles of effective sales techniques. Topics include personal analysis, personality development, buying motives, product knowledge, company awareness, technology, relationship selling, sales presentations, sales resistance, and sales closings.

Sales4
MKT 202
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the principles and practices of advertising - the planning and research functions, the techniques and execution of advertising, the way the message is created, media decisions, and current issues facing the industry. Analyzes the effects of advertising on the consumer and examines the structure of the advertising messages and how they are adapted to specific audiences.

Advertising4
MKT 215
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a balanced exposure to marketing theory and practice with significant application of marketing principles via case studies and project work.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 111B, MKT 201, MKT 202.
Applied Marketing4
MKT 241
4 Quarter Hours

Explores how digital advertising and social media fit into the marketing process. Introduces the concept of building brand communities by interactive, two-way communication through the objectives of theory, tactics, media, and planning. Topics include strategic communication planning, digital media, social media, customer relationship management, ethics, and digital marketing careers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
MGT 101, MKT 111B.
Advertising/Digital Marketing I4
MKT 251
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the data analysis process and the value of data analysis to marketing in a macro view. Students explore marketing accountability and data integrity. Topics include problem identification and value stream, business intelligence tools, MAIP (Measurement Analysis Interpretation Presentation), data vs. information, qualitative and quantitative data, primary and secondary data, relevance, validity, neutrality, and ethical and legal implications of data analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101, INF 113, MTH 108
MKT 111B
Marketing Analytics I4
MKT 261
4 Quarter Hours

Provide students an opportunity to apply all acquired business knowledge to real life business and organizations. Focus will be on providing viable solutions with value stream relevance in a dynamic marketing environment. This is the capstone course for the Associate degree in Marketing.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 131, MKT 241, MKT 251
Marketing Planning4
MKT 291
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the opportunity to analyze, assess, and recommend a marketing strategy, as a class, for an existing business. Focus will be on developing a total analysis package based on material studied in previous associate's degree level classes. This is a group activity similar to that of a marketing team in the world of consulting.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 215
Marketing Seminar4
MKT 312
4 Quarter Hours

Studies consumer functions such as decision-making, attitude formation and change, cognition, perception, and learning. The marketing concepts of product positioning, segmentation, brand loyalty, shopping preference and diffusion of innovations are considered in context with the environmental, ethical, multicultural and social influences on an increasingly diverse American consumer.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 261
Consumer Behavior4
MKT 342
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the exploration of how digital advertising and social media fit into the marketing process. Emphasis will be on social networking, crowd-sourcing, mobile computing, location marketing, and development of a digital marketing plan using social media integrated with the more traditional marketing tools to fulfill the organization's objectives of satisfying the customer. Students will develop a digital marketing campaign in the course.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 261
Digital Marketing II4
MKT 352
4 Quarter Hours

Continues the exploration of data analysis related to marketing. Students will examine a systematic and objective approach to marketing research focusing on gathering and analyzing information to make better marketing decisions. Various research methodologies are reviewed and students will work on developing data gathering instruments, participate in collecting the data, analyzing the data and producing effective reports which can be used in decision making.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 261
Marketing Analytics II4
MKT 401
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the notion that in order to satisfy a need and create customer satisfaction, a business must know about its customers. Students will examine a systematic and objective approach to marketing research focusing on gathering and analyzing information to make better marketing decisions. Research methods will focus on planning, problem solving, and controlling. Methodologies covered include correlation, experimentation, observation, survey, and case study research.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 215 or MKT 291.
Marketing Research4
MKT 402
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on advancing the advertising campaign beyond MKT202 (Advertising) and managing the functions for getting the advertising proposal to an actual advertising initiative. This course addresses the functions of advertising agencies, media-services, agency-client relationships, integrating graphic design and marketing concepts, in-house and contractual advertising management issues, timetables, and production issues. Strategic applications, pulsing, and advertising personnel issues are also studied. This includes the study of advertising legal environments, copyrighting, types of consumer promotions and trends, and understanding specific media jargon including rate/cost calculations.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 202.
Advertising Management4
MKT 421
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the relationship of the marketing mix to the total business environment. Some group work is required to be done outside of class. This is the capstone course of the marketing sequence, taught in seminar fashion.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 312
Marketing Management4
MKT 436
4 Quarter Hours

Gives students the opportunity to participate in a course that integrates previous marketing content knowledge in a problem-based learning environment. Students will design an integrated marketing campaign including a detailed marketing plan which incorporates a marketing code of ethics, and effective communication plan for the presentation of this integrated marketing campaign to both internal and external stakeholders. This is the capstone course of the Bachelor in Business Administration in Marketing program.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 312, MKT 342, MKT 352
Marketing Strategy and Design4
MNP 202
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure such as implementing server images, user and group management with Active Directory Domain Services(AD DS) and group policy, remote access and network policies, data security, monitoring and update management. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-411: Administering Windows Server 2012.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 201
Microsoft Windows Server Administration II4
MNP 203
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students for advanced configuration of services necessary to deploy, manage and maintain a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure, such as advanced networking services, Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), identity management, rights management, federated services, network load balancing, failover clustering, business continuity and disaster recovery. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-412: Configuring Advanced Windows Server 2012 Services.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 202
Microsoft Windows Server Administration III4
MNP 211
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and skills that are needed to effectively install, configure, administer and support the primary services of a Microsoft Windows Server system such as managing, and supporting user and computer accounts, groups, Domain Name System zones and client settings; group policy objects; the new Active Directory Lightweight Directory Service and Active Directory Rights Management Service; backup and recovery; and communication security. Passage of the corresponding exam 70-640, will count towards completion of the MCITP certifications.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 221
Configuring Windows Server 2008 Active Directory4
MNP 221
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and skills that are needed to effectively configure remote access, Network Access Protection (NAP), network authentication, IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, and Domain Name System (DNS) replication; capturing performance data and monitoring event logs; and managing file and print services. The course assists in preparation for Microsoft exam #70-642. Passage of the corresponding exam will count towards completion of the MCITP certifications.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 171A
Configuring Windows Server 2008 Network Infrastructure4
MNP 231
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the knowledge and skills that are needed to effectively configure, manage, and support user and computer accounts, groups, Domain Name System zones, client settings, and group policy objects; the new Active Directory Lightweight Directory Service and Active Directory Rights Management Service; configuring remote access, Network Access Protection, Network Authentication, IPv4 and IPv6 addressing, and Domain Name System (DNS) Replication; creating virtual machines; installing server core; planning server roles; maintaining server security; planning data storage, network load balancing, and server backups; managing software deployment and versioning; and scheduling server deployments. The course assists in preparation for Microsoft exam #70-646. Passage of the corresponding exam will count towards completion of the MCITP certifications.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 221
Administering Windows Server 20084
MNP 301
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on teaching individuals how to use SQL Server product features and tools related to implementing and maintaining a database. Topics include installing and configuring SQL Server, manipulating SQL data files and implementing data integrity and security. Content of this course maps to Microsoft's SQL Server certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 331
MCSE 264 or MNP 211.
Corequisite(s):
CSS 211.
Implementing and Maintaining Microsoft SQL Server4
MNP 311
4 Quarter Hours

Provides the student with the skills and knowledge necessary to install, configure, manage and maintain a SharePoint environment for both on-premise and SharePoint Online servers. Additionally, this course covers the skills necessary to deploy and manage applications in a SharePoint environment. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certified Technology Specialist examination, 70-667: TS: Microsoft SharePoint 2010, Configuring.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 301
CSS 211, MCSE 264 or MNP 221.
Configuring Microsoft Office Sharepoint Server4
MNP 321
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to install and manage Microsoft Exchange Server 2007. Topics include managing routing, client access and messaging security, recovering messaging servers and databases, as well as monitor and troubleshoot Exchange Server 2007. Content of this course maps to Microsoft's 70-236 certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
CSS 211, MCSE 264 or MNP 211.
Configuring Microsoft Exchange Server4
MNP 401
4 Quarter Hours

Teaches students how to plan, implement, and support Terminal Services and Internet Information Server 7.0. Content of this course maps to Microsoft's 70-643 certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
CSS 211, MCSE 264 or MNP 221.
Configuring Windows Server 2008 Applications Infrastructure4
MNP 411
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the role of Enterprise Administrator. The enterprise administrator is responsible for the overall IT environment and architecture, translates business goals into technology decisions, designs mid-range to long-term strategies and is responsible for infrastructure design and global configuration changes. Topics include network infrastructure, directory services, identity management and authentication, security policies, best practices, standards, and service level agreements (SLAs). Content of this course maps to Microsoft's 70-647 certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 401
Windows Server 2008 Enterprise Administrator4
MTH 101
4 Quarter Hours

Presents the application of mathematical skills to business functions to provide students with the basics needed to compute problems in the areas of simple interest, ratios, percentages, compound interest, annuities, and present values.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Mathematics for Business4
MTH 108
4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
MTH 111
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
MTH 112A
4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
College Algebra4
MTH 401
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111
Statistical Methods4
NET 211
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the planning, designing, installing and configuring of wireless LANs. Offers in-depth coverage of wireless networks with extensive coverage of IEEE 802.11 b/a/g/pre-n implementation, design, managing, security, and troubleshooting. Material is reinforced with hands-on projects. This course prepares students for the Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) certification.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 102
Wireless Networking4
NET 224
4 Quarter Hours

Examines router elements, RIP and IGRP routing protocols, router operating system software, configuration and installation, and LAN segmentation using bridges, routers, and switches. Covers the operation of the Spanning Tree protocol. Focus is on Cisco technology. Includes hands-on exercises.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 222
Advanced Routers and Routing4
NET 226A
4 Quarter Hours

Covers internetwork design concepts, LAN/WAN technologies, management and security principles, and naming and documentation practices. Includes hands-on exercises.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 224
Designing Internetwork Solutions4
NPMG 301
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes student understanding of grant writing standards and procedures to plan for writing a grant proposal. The process of developing a grant proposal will be exercised as students write a state, federal, or foundation grant. Exploration of partnerships and alliances will be explored along with the grant budget. Students will understand the grants management process.  Students will have an opportunity to review grant applications for the purpose of understanding and improvement.

Grant Writing4
NPMG 311
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the history of Non-Profits and their role in society. Governance, precisely the role of the board vs. the role of the CEO/President, including planning, ethics, and professional communication will be addressed. Operations management of the Non-Profit vs. the Profit organization and how it is structured will be topics included. Planning for funding is a large part of the Non-Profit coupled with community needs, creativity and innovation, strategic vs. tactical and how the mission of the organization is being followed. The types of funding available for Non-Profits include government grants, corporation grants, donors, and foundations.

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management4
NPMG 312
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes that fund development is the lifeblood of a Non-Profit and how technology, risk assessment, public policy and advocacy play a part will be highlighted. Financial management principles will be addressed as they pertain to philanthropy, government influence, and financial reports. The methodology for fund development will be examined through event planning, fund raising strategies, and the development team. Human Resource management of the Non-Profit is very important in determining a policy manual which addresses the subjects of culture, the volunteer work force, the subject matter expert, and the life-long learner.

Prerequisite(s):
NPMG 311.
Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management II4
NPMG 321
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with understanding that the mission of the Non-Profit will be communicated through the marketing principles and strategies. The use of media, technology, social networking, and a marketing plan will promote the ideas of the NP. Since event planning is a large part of the promotion plan, attention to the image, branding, professionalism, ethics, and culture will be the focus. Communication strategies for internal/external stakeholders, media relations, cultural competency, and conflict resolution will be addressed.

Marketing and Communication for Non-Profit Organizations4
NPMG 331
4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the history and trends of philanthropy and the laws that impact fund development. Policies for fund development will be constructed and the role of the Board of Directors vs. staff will be outlined. The opportunity for the use of technology used in the fund development will be discussed along with available resources. As operational tasks in fund development are carried out, ethical and professional standards will be discussed including transparency. The challenges to fund development will be addressed including the results vs. the effort in fund raising, strategies, employee burn out, the economy, skilled staff, etc.

Fund Development4
POL 201A
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the functions of government at the national, state, and local levels. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies on individuals and businesses. The areas of study include the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, courts, the bureaucracy, the economy, congress, the Presidency, and political parties.

American Political Systems4
POL 401
4 Quarter Hours

Includes the study of international relations theory, development, and communications as well as American and comparative foreign policy analysis, international law, comparative politics, and peace studies, including conflict resolution and arms control.

International Relations4
PPM 311
4 Quarter Hours

Expands on student's knowledge of project planning. Topics include project and scope definition, feasibility studies, activity sequencing, and identification of measures of success. Students will learn how to create, plan and effectively use planning tools, including project management software to work with subtasks, assign resources, and resolve time and resource conflicts.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status, WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Project Planning4
PPM 321
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with complete coverage of the knowledge, attitude, and skills necessary for success in negotiation. Topics include strategies and techniques for negotiation, different forms of negotiation, ethical and unethical behavior, conflict resolution, and mediation. Students will practice these principles to increase their negotiating ability.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Negotiation Strategies4
PPM 401
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to accounting concepts and principles necessary for developing project budgets and monitoring budget costs. This course also covers cost estimation techniques. Students will practice developing a project budget, tracking costs, and reporting financial cost information. Also addresses issues related to risk analysis, risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status, MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Project Cost and Budget Management4
PPM 411
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses effective utilization of human resources in project management. Provides an understanding of project leadership techniques, authority and power, motivation, team development, as well as problem solving, decision making, and interpersonal skills. Students will develop an understanding of effective communication techniques for communicating project status as well as recruitment of project team members.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Leading Project Teams4
PPM 421
4 Quarter Hours

Explains the contracting and procurement process and the roles and responsibilities of the project manager in successful contracting to meet a project's objectives. Topics include procurement planning and management, preparing statements of work, proposal requests, contractor selection, and types of contracts. Introduces principles of contract and subcontract administration and reviews the differences between government and private purchasing processes.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Contracting and Procurement for Project Managers4
PSY 101
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
PSY 111
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
PSY 201A
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the background, theoretical underpinnings, and process of cognitive behavior therapy. Topics include maladaptive thought patterns and cognitive behavior therapy solutions, several expressions of cognitive behavior therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy applications to common problems such as fear, anger, addiction, and depression.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111
Cognitive-Behavior Therapy4
PSY 211
4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
PSY 221
4 Quarter Hours

Examines changes that occur across the human life span, from conception to old age and death. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Developmental Psychology4
PSY 231
4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology4
PSY 281
4 Quarter Hours

Develops a personal understanding of stress and a proactive approach for confronting negative stressors and reactions to stress through a variety of learning opportunities.

Stress Management4
PSY 311
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Abnormal Psychology4
PSY 331
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on theories and research in human development from conception to puberty. Selected topics include physical, language, intellectual, moral, personality, and socio-emotional development.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Human Development I4
PSY 335
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality4
PSY 350
4 Quarter Hours

Explores human development from conception through late childhood, with an emphasis on mental, social, and emotional growth. Developmental processes of socialization, cognition, emotional growth, and personality development are examined. Theories about child development are assessed. Research findings on disorders common to children are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 221
Child Psychology4
PSY 351
4 Quarter Hours

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. This course focuses on the understanding adolescents in our society. The emphasis is on behavior development in establishing skills necessary to work with this group. This includes physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Adolescent Psychology4
PSY 401
4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology4
SAL 201
4 Quarter Hours

Delves deeper into the various areas of sales including: ways to sell, how to sell, and the different mediums in sales. Topics include communication skills in various sales settings, current and emerging technologies to communicate with customers. It will introduce mathematical concepts and skills used to create a sales strategy and discuss the importance of product knowledge, understanding your competition, and opening and closing the sale.

Professional Sales I4
SAL 202
4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to examine the importance of branding, and analyze the sales cycles as it relates to your company. Calculate industry specific margins within your company and analyze your business from a global perspective. Use current and emerging technologies to communicate with a customer.

Professional Sales II4
SAL 231
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to technology tools to enhance selling. Students will be introduced to CRM or Customer Relationship Management software to store information about your customers as well as every interaction with customers. Students will understand the latest and greatest ways to contact customers, show presentations and be connected to their customers.

Sales Technology4
SCI 100F
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the structural organization of body systems. This course is designed for students with limited background in chemistry and biology. This course is intended for allied health students who need an overview of body systems. Students should check specific program requirements for anatomy and physiology before enrolling.

Structure and Function of the Human Body4
SCI 101C
5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I5
SCI 111
5 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts. Topics include classification of plants and animals, cell theory, cell structure, plant and animal tissues and organs, nutritional requirements of plants and animals, energy metabolism, and use of basic biology laboratory techniques and equipment. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Biology5
SCI 215
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 124
Integrated Physics4
SCI 220A
5 Quarter Hours

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A 20 hour laboratory will be a component of this course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture.

Microbiology5
SCI 246
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in MTH 108 or B- or better in MTH 111.
Chemistry I4
SCI 251
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes classical mechanics. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 141
General Physics I4
SCI 321
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

Principles of Astronomy4
SCI 451
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science4
SCM 231
4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an overview to all the aspects of transportation. Discusses the changes that took place with the Deregulation Act of 1980, JIT competition in the market place, and globalization of business. Also discusses how the transportation industry affects the success of corporations and national economic development. Provides an understanding of how transportation affects natural resources including land, water, and air. Course provides an insight into the career paths and the future for both the transportation industry and logistics managers.

Transportation Management4
SCM 242
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a basic knowledge of the supply chain strategy and concepts and will give students an understanding of the analytical tools necessary to solve supply chain problems. Three key areas and their interrelationships are addressed which include the strategic role of the supply chain, key drivers of supply chain performance, and the analytical tools and techniques for supply chain analysis. Procurement, outsourcing, inventory models, supply chain distribution strategies, pricing, and revenue management are some of the key topics addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 202
Supply Chain Management4
SCM 251
4 Quarter Hours

Presents an overview of logistics discussing the development and growth in this field. Further addresses the elements of a logistics system examining areas such as order management, customer service, domestic transportation systems, traffic management, inventory management, distribution centers, warehousing, and international logistics. This course concludes with examining the components used in analyzing, designing, and implementing a logistics system.

Logistics Management4
SCM 271
4 Quarter Hours

Offers an examination of the global market for domestic and international logistics and transportation services. This includes the role of shipping and air transportation in intermodal business logistics and their effect on world trade. Also covered are issues in the management of domestic, international, air, maritime, rail, and truck transportation.

Prerequisite(s):
SCM 231.
Intermodal Transportation4
SCM 301
4 Quarter Hours

Reviews procurement strategies and supply chain management from many different aspects including the firm's stakeholders and the impact of procurement and supply chain management on the competitive success of the organization. The major areas covered are ethical, contractual and legal issues faced by procurement; introduction to techniques and tools for managing the procurement and sourcing process; supplier selection and relationship management, and special purchasing applications and research.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Procurement and Supply Chain Management4
SCM 321
4 Quarter Hours

Explores production planning, master scheduling, computer-integrated manufacturing, capacity planning and demand management. Just-in-time systems are also reviewed during this course.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 313A and MTH 401 and Junior Status.
Manufacturing, Planning, and Control4
SCM 401
4 Quarter Hours

Reviews standard techniques commonly used within the industry in the development and use of classical inventory models. Advanced techniques utilizing optimization modeling will also be introduced. Students will use modeling to examine supply chain scenarios from case studies to assist them in their ability to make better decision about sourcing, manufacturing, transportation, warehousing, customer service and inventory management. Course assists students in their preparation for the APICS/CPIM certification.

Prerequisite(s):
SCM 301 or SCM 321.
Decision Modeling in Supply Chains4
SCM 421
4 Quarter Hours

Presents a current and future view of industry trends and direction of integrated logistics and supply chain management Oral and written discussions based on student assessment of the industry in areas such as procurement strategies, strategic outsourcing, mitigation of supply chain risks, strategic allocation of inventories, transportation and distribution issues, scheduling and sequencing issues, and customer service issues will be complemented by guest lectures, webinars etc. in order to address a wide array of current, trending and advanced topics. Course assists students in their preparation for the APICS/CPIM certification.

Prerequisite(s):
SCM 401
Advanced Topics in Supply Chain Management4
SOC 201
4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 321
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SOC 341
4 Quarter Hours

Examines the values and cultural contexts of global professional settings. Emphasis is on analyzing problems and possible solutions in global interactions.

Global Perspectives4
SPK 201
4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 211
4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to work effectively in groups. Students will collaborate to complete a group project and multiple presentations. Course content covers key concepts of group dynamics such as diversity, group roles, ethical issues, and conflict resolution. Students will hone group communication skills and effectively use technology to communicate with group members.

Prerequisite(s):
Education Majors: SPK 201.
Corequisite(s):
EDU 312A. All other majors: PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401A
4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
SPN 101
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
SPN 102
4 Quarter Hours

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed SPN 101. This course continues to develop students ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 101 or 1 year high school Spanish.
Spanish II4
SPN 103
4 Quarter Hours

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed SPN 102. This course continues to develop the student's ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 102 or 2 years high school Spanish.
Spanish III4
VCP 201
4 Quarter Hours

Explores the installation, configuration and management of VMware vSphere. The course is based on ESXi and vCenter Server and gives students practical lab experience in installing vSphere components; configuring and managing ESXi networking and storage using vCenter Server; deploying, managing and migrating virtual machines; monitoring ESXi resources; and using vCenter to manage high availability and data protection of virtual systems. Completion of this course satisfies the prerequisite for taking the VMware Certified Professional 5 certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 102
LUX 205 or MNP 171A
VMware vSphere: Install, Configure, Manage4
VCP 202
4 Quarter Hours

Builds skills in the VMware View suite of products, which includes VMware View Manager, View Composer and VMware ThinApp. Students will gain experience in installing and configuring View components; creating and managing dedicated and floating desktop pools, deploying and managing linked-clone virtual desktops; configuring user profiles with View Persona management; configuring secure access to desktops through a public network; and using ThinApp to package applications

Prerequisite(s):
VCP 201
VMware View: Install, Configure, Manage4
VCP 211
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on providing students with advanced knowledge, skills and abilities to achieve competence in troubleshooting the VMware vSphere virtual infrastructure. Students perform labs teaching them to diagnose and rectify configuration problems with VMware ESXi hosts and vCenter Server. Skills taught include using the VMware vSphere Management Assistant appliance to rectify problems; using a network sniffer to capture and display virtual switch network traffic; and using vSphere Client and command-line tools to troubleshoot VMware vMotion, VMware Storage vMotion, VMware High Availability, VMware Distributed Resource Scheduler and virtual machine power-on problems. Completion of this course satisfies the prerequisite for taking the VMware Certified Professional 5 certification examination.

Prerequisite(s):
VCP 201
VMware vSphere: Troubleshooting4
VCP 212
4 Quarter Hours

Combines topics from two VMware courses and gives students additional training in monitoring and managing performance as well as best practices for the secure design, deployment and operation of in the VMware vSphere environment. Skills taught include using vSphere tools to monitor performance of ESXi hosts; diagnose performance problems relating to CPU, memory, network and storage on ESXi hosts; achieving optimal virtual machine configurations; identifying vulnerabilities and recommending corrective actions in the design of a vSphere environment; hardening vSphere components as described in the vSphere Hardening Guide; and recommending configuration and change management policies, processes and systems.

Prerequisite(s):
VCP 211
VMware vSphere: Manage for Performance and Security4
WEB 111B
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces concepts in website development using Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) and other components such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Javascript. Topics will include: evolution of web development, website design concepts, standard HTML techniques, and trends in the field of web Development.

Introduction to HTML4
WEB 121A
4 Quarter Hours

Instructs students in the creation of a website and in the use of web page development tools. Students apply their skills in the creation of web pages using text, graphics, tables, and frames. This course will enable students to create their own web pages and websites for publishing information on the Internet. Emphasis on effective design and layout of web pages and sites is provided.

Prerequisite(s):
Any INF course or WEB 111B.
World Wide Web Design4
WEB 131
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation in website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare web-based solutions through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current methodology including CSS and HTML5.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 111B.
Web Development I4
WEB 132
4 Quarter Hours

Provides professional level website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare professional level web-based solutions for multiple Internet capable devices through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current enhanced methodology including JavaScript and jQuery.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 131
Web Development II4
WEB 201
4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to web-development tools for animation. Enables students to produce websites with interactive objects, graphics, and animation.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 111B.
Web Multi-Media4
WEB 211
4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the skills in utilizing Java-script and HTML. Enables students to integrate Java-script and HTML to create interactive websites that include pop-up windows, pop-up menus, and image rollovers. This course includes working with forms, images, frames, windows and cookies.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111
WEB 111B, CS 111
Web Scripting4
WEB 221
4 Quarter Hours

Enables students to work with CGI/scripts for creating interactive web applications. Students will install and modify scripts as part of site development projects. The course also includes web-database integration.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 211
Interactive Web Design4
WEB 241
4 Quarter Hours

Provides experienced Flash designers with the knowledge and hands-on practice they need to create event-driven animation and interactive web elements. Introduction of core ActionScript concepts is also included.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 201
ActionScript Programming4
WRI 115
4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
4 Quarter Hours

Improves students ability to write for business and technical purposes relevant to student's major field or career aspirations. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Students will practice and develop skills for writing and communicating in a professional environment.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115
Report Writing4
WRK 291B
1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
WRK 486A
4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform a requirement of 400 hours paid or unpaid work experience in an approved off site food service operation. Provides supervised work experience to enable students to apply skills acquired through the food and beverage program. Students will actively participate in management and operation of a food service operation. Students will maintain a detailed journal logging hours in specific competencies. This course is taken during the final quarter of a student's program after completion of prior program requirements.

Food and Beverage Management Externship4
WRKBS 201
4 Quarter Hours

Provides a 120-hour learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Program completion based on Associate or Bachelor requirements may vary between programs. There may be certain course requirements that require completion prior to enrolling in the work experience course.

Work Experience4
WRKCM 201A
4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform 200 hours of unpaid supervised kitchen work experience in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's fine dining restaurant-Courses or other approved location. Students will participate in weekly seminars through Blackboard and demonstrate competencies in required skills. All students will demonstrate competency in requisitioning products, food safety, cost control, multi-tasking, and entry-level management tasks. Baking and Pastry students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including bread and pastry production. Culinary students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including menu development, mise en place, and production. Food and Beverage students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including guest-relations, marketing, food-service accounting, planning, and front-of-the-house management. This course is taken during the final quarter of student's program after completion of prior program requirements.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director / Dean Approval
Work Experience4

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FAQ's

  • Is there online tutoring for APA styles?

    Online students can find help with APA citations and formatting in their Blackboard classroom.

    • Cick the Online Tutoring button on the left-hand side of the page.
    • Click on Schedules. 
    • Click on English (between Economics and Finance).
    • Click the Enroll button next to APA Questions & Answers Classroom.
    • Click Submit.

    After you enroll in the APA Classroom, you'll find all the available APA-related resources. You can also ask questions on the Discussion Board, which is monitored by Baker's online librarians. For more information, contact us at library@baker.edu.

  • How do I sign up for tutoring?

    Contact Learning Support Services on your campus to sign up for tutoring. If you're a Baker Online student or the in a Center for Graduate Studies program, you may request tutoring by visiting Blackboard's Community tab, in the Institution Discussion Boards area.

  • If a new disability evaluation is needed, who pays for it?

    Neither your high school nor your postsecondary school is required to conduct or pay for a new evaluation to document your disability and need for accommodations.

  • Do I have to prove that I have a disability to receive accommodations?

    Yes. You are required to provide relevant comprehensive documentation that without the services you would not have equal access.

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    No. However, if you want the school to provide an accommodation, you must identify yourself as having a disability.

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