Jigsaw

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Activity:                 Jigsaw

Time:                       30-90 minutes

Intent:                    This is an efficient strategy for helping students master different pieces of information and then immediately teach it to others to reinforce learning.

Process:                

  • The instructor provides a clear division of course content in which different students in each group are responsible for mastering and teaching others.
  • The students will participate in two groups. In group one, they will become the content experts and teach their content to everyone in their second group.
  • Each of the two groups should have four to six students. Four groups might look like the following (based on 16 students):

 

 

Group 1

Group 2

Group 3

Group 4

Group A

1A

2A

3A

4A

Group B

1B

2B

3B

4B

Group C

1C

2C

3C

4C

Group D

1D

2D

3D

4D

  • The first group would consist of Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, as indicated by the solid rectangle above.
  • The second group would consist of Groups A, B, C, and D, as indicated by the dotted rectangle above.
  • The first groups, consisting of Groups 1, 2, 3, and 4, will review the material and plan how to teach the material to their second group.
    • For example: Group 1–Legislative; Group 2–Executive; Group 3-Judicial; Group 4- U.S. Constitutional Powers granted to the Three Branches of Government.
  • Create a new jigsaw consisting of Groups A, B, C, and D.
  • In the second group, each group member presents the material he/she prepared in the first group and learns the material presented by other group members.
  • The whole class reflects on the groups’ discoveries during a closure activity.

Uses:

  • Helps participants’ master different pieces of information that, when put together, cover a complete topic. Students soon realize that each piece--each student's part--is essential for full understanding of the material.
  • Experienced teachers know that teaching something to others requires an understanding of the subject matter beyond surface learning. As students develop strategies for teaching to their peers, they may discover examples, anecdotes, or analogies that enhance their comprehension.
  • The jigsaw approach can provide a pleasant alternative to lecture for helping students learn conceptual material.

Video:

Dr. Dennis Burin, Baker College of Port Huron, Education and Human Services

 

G:ETL_TeachingStrategies_Jigsaw_4/2012

https://www.baker.edu/departments/etl/2010/AIM/QTL/bakerTube/index.cfm

The Baker College System
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