Combine your creativity with management skills.

Develop your recipe for success.

Bakers and pastry chefs create breads, pastries, desserts, and confections that taste as wonderful as they look. They combine the math and science of baking with the imagination and creativity to artfully prepare baked goods, specialty sugars, and chocolate confections.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
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Testimonial - Chef Luis Amado
Testimonial quote

Our students have been extremely successful in competitions…gold medals, best of shows…

Chef Luis Amado
Baking and Pastry Program
Baking and Pastry Associate Degree from the Culinary Institute of Michigan - a Division of Baker College

Baking and PastryAssociate of Applied Science

Combine your creativity with management skills.

Develop your recipe for success.

Bakers and pastry chefs create breads, pastries, desserts, and confections that taste as wonderful as they look. They combine the math and science of baking with the imagination and creativity to artfully prepare baked goods, specialty sugars, and chocolate confections.

Discover Your Future Baking and Pastry Career

Career Facts

$23,140

Median salary for Bakers

2%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$60,549

Median salary for Executive Pastry Chef

View citations
Overview

Baker’s Baking and Pastry associate degree program focuses on both the art and the business of baking and pastry, preparing you for bakeshop leadership as a pastry chef or other bakery supervisory position.  

Through hands-on training, advanced learning technologies, labs, and classroom studies, you learn the specialized knowledge and techniques used in professional baking and pastry outlets. Your studies include production of pastries, baked goods and specialty items, as well as bakery staff selection and training, purchasing, inventory control, item costing, and overall bakeshop management.

As a graduate, you will be prepared to begin your career in a leadership position in a retail bakery, pastry or bakery shop, commercial baking operation, fine dining restaurant, country club, hotel, or resort.

This program is part of the Baker College Smart Degree Option.

Course Information
Baking and Pastry Arts Major Requirements83 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
BPA 111
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6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic principles of baking. Through hands-on experience students learn the identification of bakery tools and equipment, proper weighing and scaling of ingredients, and basic mixing methods. Students will learn to prepare basic breads, doughs, and starters along with choux products and pies. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 100, C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Baking Techniques I6
BPA 112
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6 Quarter Hours

Continues from BPA 111 and focuses on the production and theory of baked goods such as flat breads, hard crusted breads, laminated doughs, puff pastry and specialty breads in a lab and lecture format. This course continues a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 111.
Baking Techniques II6
BPA 151
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6 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basic techniques used in pastry production. Through extensive hands-on labs, students will focus on the preparations involved with cake batters, foams, mousses, fillings, meringues, buttercreams, and Bavarian creams. Students will also focus on assembly and decoration of European cakes, basic glazing and icing techniques, syrup preparation and shortdough applications.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 112.
Pastry Techniques I6
BPA 152
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides a focused, hands-on, comprehensive study of the techniques used in the production of International pastries, contemporary cakes, and restaurant cakes. Students will also utilize techniques in the design and layout of Charlottes and preparation of entremets and bombes.

Corequisite(s):
BPA 151.
Pastry Techniques II6
BPA 153
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6 Quarter Hours

Expands on the concepts and skills from Pastry Techniques II, with a continuation of techniques used for further applications. Students will focus on the design and assembly of wedding cakes, showpiece cakes and special occasion cakes as well as the building methods and techniques used for showpiece cakes. Students will be introduced to the advanced skills used in sugar work, rolled, colored and formed gum paste, fondant and modeling chocolate pastes.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 152.
Pastry Techniques III6
BPA 221
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth introduction into the production of various pastries. Students focus on the skills and knowledge needed to produce tarts, petit fours, tea pastries, mignardise, molded mousses, napoleons, cream horns, Baklava and other pastries for sweet tables.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 251 or BPA 251A.
Advanced Confectionary Arts I6
BPA 222
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides students the hands-on experience in the production and preparation of jellies, candies, cordials, crystallized fruits, sugared nuts, ganaches and other confectionary fillings for bonbons and truffles. Students will learn proper chocolate tempering techniques, confectionary mold preparation, cocoa butter painting and spraying.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 221.
Advanced Confectionary Arts II6
BPA 223
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6 Quarter Hours

Examines advanced confectionary production skills in the design and building of chocolate showpieces. Students will also utilize the techniques used in blown, pulled, and poured sugar showpieces and decorations, packed sugar and pastillage décor. The culmination of student knowledge will be exhibited with the design, fabrication and assembly of competition chocolate and sugar centerpieces.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 222.
Advanced Confectionary Arts III6
BPA 251A
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6 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes preparing students in a working production environment. Students will focus on plated desserts for restaurant and banquet work, hot and cold desserts, trios, deconstructed desserts, samplers and ice creams. Students will develop proper plating and service selections, color, texture, height and focal point balance. Plate presentations of simple and complex desserts will be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
BPA 151, BPA 152.
Cafe and Restaurant Production6
CUL 101
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the food service industry and program expectations. Students will discuss the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the food service industry. Responsible alcohol service will also be emphasized along with the certification testing (TIPs). Additionally, students will begin understanding the impact of sustainability measures in the food service industry. Minimum grade of 'C' or better is required.

Introduction to Food Service and Hospitality2
CUL 110
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students, in depth, to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explores both fresh and prepared foods and students learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 131B.
Product Identification2
CUL 115A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the math skills needed to calculate percentages, ratios, the metric system, conversion factors, yield tests, recipe conversion and recipe costing as they relate to the food service industry. Students will develop projections and analyze costs in yield tests and recipe pre-costing.

Culinary Math4
CUL 131B
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to food production practices governed by changing federal and state regulations. Topics to be covered include prevention of food-borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. This course utilizes the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® materials, prepares for and culminates with the administration of the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® Certification examination.

Food Safety2
CUL 141
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2 Quarter Hours

Examines the basic concepts and principles of nutrition. In this course, students learn about basic nutrients, food labeling, nutritional principles, current issues in nutrition, and the application of nutritional principles to menu development. Students will also be involved in writing and nutritional analysis of recipes.

Corequisite(s):
CUL 131B.
Nutrition2
CUL 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the information and skills necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a foodservice establishment. Topics include the flow of goods, income statements, forecasting sales, and controlling labor and food costs. Students will also analyze the complete purchasing cycle of a restaurant, beginning with product and vendor selection and ending with actual orders.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 110, C or better in CUL 115.
Purchasing and Cost Control4
FBM 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to all aspects of menu development. Students will develop menus start to finish, including, analyzing a business, creating a concept that is appropriate to a theme of a restaurant, and developing a menu appropriate to the theme. Students will utilize industry specific mathematics to cost out menus, and analyze existing menus. Students will learn to analyze a balanced menu based on food cost, labor cost, operating expenses, and extensive market research.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Menu Planning and Analysis4
FBM 241
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of a food service operation plan and essential skills needed to manage a variety of food service operations. Emphasis is given on strong leadership skill development, developing front of the house and back of the house teams, staffing, labor cost, human resource management, and creating restaurant long term plans.

Food and Beverage Management4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
WRKCM 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform 200 hours of unpaid supervised kitchen work experience in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's fine dining restaurant-Courses or other approved location. Students will participate in weekly seminars through Blackboard and demonstrate competencies in required skills. All students will demonstrate competency in requisitioning products, food safety, cost control, multi-tasking, and entry-level management tasks. Baking and Pastry students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including bread and pastry production. Culinary students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including menu development, mise en place, and production. Food and Beverage students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including guest-relations, marketing, food-service accounting, planning, and front-of-the-house management. This course is taken during the final quarter of student's program after completion of prior program requirements.

Work Experience4
General Education Requirements32 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
INF 112
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Word Processing2
INF 113
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 115

Program Description

This programs trains and prepares graduates for pastry chef and other bakery supervisory positions. People with baking and pastry skills are employed in retail bakeries, fine dining restaurants, pastry and bakery shops, commercial baking operations, country clubs, and hotel/resort bake shops, where they utilize their experiences to artfully prepare baked goods, specialty breads and pastries, cookies, petite fours, wedding cakes, specialty sugar and chocolate showpieces. This program also prepares graduates to skillfully manage the respective operations, as well as prepare them for leadership roles in the bakeshop and in the special knowledge and techniques used in professional baking and pastry outlets. Typical duties include: production of pastries, staff selection and training, purchasing, inventory control, item costing, and overall bakeshop management. Instruction is provided through a combination of classroom, hands-on laboratory, and internshipeducation experience.

Accreditation

The Baker College of Muskegon Baking and Pastry program is accredited by the American Culinary Federation Education Foundation Accrediting Commission (ACFEFAC).

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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Program Finder

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • Load More FAQ'S
Testimonial - Chef Luis Amado
Testimonial quote

Our students have been extremely successful in competitions…gold medals, best of shows…

Chef Luis Amado
Baking and Pastry Program