Teach young children.

Build strong foundations for life.

Early Childhood Educators have the opportunity to have a significant impact on children’s lives, using their knowledge and skills to help children explore, learn, and interpret the world around them. The early years of a child's life set the stage, and much of what he or she learns and experiences during this time shapes his or her world in ways that can last a lifetime.

Discover Your
New Career

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  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
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    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

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Mary Clark, Baker College Graduate
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

I walked away with knowing I was well prepared to hit the workforce running.

Mary Clark
Early Childhood Education Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Early Childhood EducationBachelor of Science in Early Childhood Education

Teach young children.

Build strong foundations for life.

Early Childhood Educators have the opportunity to have a significant impact on children’s lives, using their knowledge and skills to help children explore, learn, and interpret the world around them. The early years of a child's life set the stage, and much of what he or she learns and experiences during this time shapes his or her world in ways that can last a lifetime.

Discover Your Future Early Childhood Education Career

Career Facts

$27,130

Median salary for Preschool Teachers

17%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$43,950

Median salary for Preschool and Childcare Center Directors

View citations
Overview

The bachelor degree program in Early Childhood Education at Baker College opens the door to greater opportunities within early childhood education. 

Our curriculum blends theory with practical studies of child development and early childhood education in a variety of professional applications. You gain experience in planning age-appropriate environments and play centers, and in developing a curriculum that gives children multiple opportunities to explore and interpret the world and teaches them basic skills in language, social skills, science, and math. 

Your classroom studies, combined with internships in child care settings, prepare you to be 100% employable in supervisor and administrative positions, as family advocates, preschool teachers, home visitors, directors, curriculum developers, and child advocates. 

This program does not lead to elementary (K-8) certification.

Course Information
Early Childhood Education Major Requirements111 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECE 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on introductory concepts of Early Childhood Education professions including professionalism, ethics, and standards. Historical events as well as current issues are reviewed. Students participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of developmentally appropriate practices within learning environments. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Introduction to Early Childhood Education4
ECE 111B
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on typical and atypical developmental milestones of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of children from birth to age 12 with a focus on the preschool years. Theories of child development and contributions of theorists are reviewed in the context of application to developmental milestones. The effects that multiple, interrelated environmental factors have on the growth and development of the child will be explored. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Childhood Development4
ECE 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the creation of a safe and healthy learning environment to encourage play, exploration, and learning. Students learn how to use space, relationships, materials, and routines as resources for ensuring an inclusive safe indoor and outdoor learning environment. Focus on how environment affects growth and development through proper nutrition, self-wellness for adults and sanitation guidelines are reviewed. Legal and ethical guidelines for reporting suspected child abuse and neglect are covered. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Healthy Environments for Early Childhood4
ECE 141A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on understanding creativity and the development of skills to assist and encourage young children to express their creative natures. Through a hands-on approach, students will compare creative materials and processes using multiple teaching strategies and disciplines. A focus on child-centered and teacher-guided experiences with attention to accommodations for children identified with special needs will be included through both process and product instructional methods. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Creative Activities4
ECE 151A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the essential organization, planning, operations, legal issues related to children and staff and ongoing quality improvement of child care centers and preschool environments. Licensing, program structure, and accreditation standards, including professionalism and ethics are reviewed. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Administration of Early Childhood Programs4
ECE 165
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmentally appropriate, ethical assessment of preschool children. Students will participate in hands-on child evaluation and practice developing assessment documents for parents and institutions for the purposes of determining current levels of functioning and directing curriculum development. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of the referral process for IEPs and IFSPs, and the roles of the teachers, parents and helping professional in these processes. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check. MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Observation and Assessment Techniques for Early Childhood Education Programs4
ECE 171A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on milestones of language development in children from birth to age 12. An exploration of language arts theory and techniques to assist children in developing foundational skills through curriculum planning that will allow them to be proficient in listening, speaking, reading, and writing is reviewed. Techniques include creative drama, puppetry, whole language exploration and phonemic awareness.  Students will also review structural and transformational linguistics theories. Specific attention is paid to English Language Learners as they acquire language in the classroom. Must complete with a C (73%) or better. 

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B or EDU 200A, DHS clearance, student background check.
Language Development and Language Arts4
ECE 201C
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmental milestones for children birth through 35 months in cognitive, language, physical, and social/emotional domains, including typical and atypical development. Provides an intense look at methods of designing and implementing appropriate programs, including curriculum and assessment, physical space adaptations, and parent/school/community partnerships. Review of applicable early intervention procedures, including IEPs and IFSPs is explored. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 201CL
Infant and Toddler Development and Curriculum4
ECE 201CL
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1 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmentally appropriate interactions between adults and children birth through 35 months in and infant/toddler ECSE, or licensed infant or toddler program. Field work components will include a focus on relationship building, environmental structure and professionalism in infant/toddler environments. Students must complete 20 hours of supervised field work. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS Clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 201C
Infant and Toddler Development and Curriculum Lab1
ECE 211A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on multiple influences of bias as well as the possible effects of personal attitudes and dispositions on children's development and learning. Students will analyze classroom environments for practices of equality, respect, and tolerance. Curriculum will be developed that will promote anti-bias ideals, create a strong classroom community, and empower families through positive reciprocal relationships. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Developing Anti-Bias Curriculum4
ECE 221B
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the integration of developmentally appropriate math, science, and technology content into the early childhood classroom curriculum. The process of using inquiry tools and problem-solving strategies and focused learning centers with content embedded in all other classroom areas is explored. Emphasis is placed on development of activities and procedures that put the child in the position of problem solving through hands-on, exploratory processes in groups or individually. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Math, Science, and Technology for Early Childhood4
ECE 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on typical and atypical social and emotional development of children birth to age 12. After reviewing assessment strategies, students will review the process for additional consultation and/or referral for children displaying atypical development, including referrals to Child Protective Services for suspected abuse or neglect. Students will apply child development theories and research through development of curriculum that enhances each child's social skills as an individual and through community group building activities. Includes 20 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Guidance and Discipline4
ECE 251
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmentally appropriate design of curricula that promotes the growth and development of the preschool child (ages 3 and 4) with curricular connections to early elementary. Differentiation for special needs is reviewed. Curricular domains covered are aesthetic, affective, cognitive, language, physical, and social/emotional. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 165, DHS clearance, student background check.
Developing Curriculum for Early Childhood4
ECE 271B
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on planning and implementing a developmentally appropriate, anti-bias, child-centered classroom environment across curricular and developmental domains. Students will demonstrate competence in child assessment, group guidance, advocacy, peer collaboration, and parent communication. Includes 90 hours of supervised participation in a licensed preschool for children for ages 3 and 4, or an ECSE preschool program. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 251, Program Director/Dean approval, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Childhood Education Practicum4
ECE 281
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on information and strategies that can be used by teachers to encourage parents to work in partnership with schools. Promoting holistic child development with the parent in the role of the teacher in the home and community with the teacher as support to the parent is explored. The teacher's role as a child advocate through mandated reporting for child abuse or neglect and family advocate through the IEP/IFSP process is reviewed. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Parents and Teachers: Partners in Education4
ECE 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on strategies for Early Childhood Education professionals to use community resources for the development of the rights of young children and their families. Addresses working with children suffering from abuse and neglect. Develops advocacy techniques on behalf of children promoting safe, healthy, and nutritional environments. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Advocating for Young Children4
ECE 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores contemporary early childhood educational practices and theoretical foundations of curriculum. Includes an introduction to Reggio Emilia and Maria Montessori's practices. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 251, DHS clearance, student background check.
Philosophies in Early Childhood Education4
ECE 361
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4 Quarter Hours

Evaluates the application of curriculum in 20 different early childhood programs and its effects on quality care for young children both on site and through research. The assessment tool will require knowledge of ECERS evaluations. The evaluations will be completed off campus. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 251, ECE 271B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Survey of Curriculum4
ECE 371
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a direct fieldwork experience implementing curriculum content in a lead teacher role under a qualified teacher. Michigan curriculum standards will serve as the basis for instruction. Includes 120 hours of participation in a structured program for 3-5 year olds. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 271B, Program Director/Dean approval, DHS clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 372.
Early Childhood Education Practicum II4
ECE 372
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops daily, weekly, and monthly lesson plans to be implemented within ECE371 Practicum II. Developmentally appropriate practices and Michigan curriculum standards will provide the framework for on-going assessment of the curriculum implementation. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 371.
Implementation of Curriculum in an Early Childhood Education Environment4
ECE 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the importance of parent and caregiver relationships in developing quality care for infants and toddlers. The essentials of infant and toddler care giving, developmental growth patterns, and direct observations will be emphasized. A 20-hour fieldwork observation will be required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 201B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Advanced Infant/Toddler Care4
ECE 441
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the physical development, music curriculum, and movement activities in an early childhood education environment. This course will require a hands-on demonstration of skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 141A, DHS clearance, student background check.
Music and Movement for Young Children4
ECE 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a direct fieldwork experience in an administrative role implementing management techniques as an assistant director, director, curriculum developer, family advocate, or home visitor. Includes 120 hours of participation in a structured program for birth-five year olds. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 151A, ECE 271B, Program Director/Dean approval, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Childhood Education Practicum III4
ECE 452
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides critical application of essential administrative duties as performed in an early childhood education environment. Knowledge of professional and ethical responsibilities will be evaluated. The duties shall include supervising, organizing, budgeting, accounting, and scheduling skills. Licensing standards and NAEYC accreditation will be emphasized. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 451.
Administrative Operations in ECE4
ECE 461
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on knowledge of characteristics and classifications of common delays, impairments, and disabilities. Tools of assessment and methods of referral for young children demonstrating atypical development with an emphasis on the goals and benefits of developmentally appropriate assessment is explored. IFSP, IEP, early intervention, and legal issues surrounding these topics will be featured. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 165, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Assessment and Referral4
ECE 471
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides essential background into speech, cultural, linguistic and language development of young children. An emphasis will be placed on the link between home and educational environment. Home-to-school activities will be developed. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 171A, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Literacy Intervention4
LIT 321A
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies classical and contemporary writing for children. Examines a selection of materials with reference to the interests, needs, and abilities of children.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Children's Literature4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HSC 100B
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1 Quarter Hours

Teaches lay rescuers the American Heart Association standards of how to recognize and treat life-threatening emergencies with adult, child, and infant victims and includes use of AEDs on adults and children. This course also provides training in basic first-aid procedures and a module on environmental emergencies. This course is designed to train anyone who might be the first to respond to an emergency in the workplace or community. Students will obtain Heartsaver CPR/AED and First Aid certification on successful completion of required components and tests.

Community First Aid1
HSC 102
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides information on adult and pediatric CPR, including two-rescuer scenarios and use of the bag-valve mask. This course provides training in foreign-body airway obstruction (conscious and unconscious), automated external defibrillation (includes child AED update), special resuscitation situations, and other cardiopulmonary emergencies at the professional rescuer level. This is an American Heart Association course and provides training in basic first-aid procedures and a module on environmental emergencies. Students will attain Heartsaver First Aid and AHA Basic Life Support for Health Care Provider certifications upon successful completion of required components and tests.

BLS Provider Training and First Aid1
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECE 181
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmental milestones and curricular planning for school-age children (5-12 years or kindergarten through 5th grade) as they relate to out of school program planning. This coursework includes instructional strategies that link the school-age curriculum and planning to State of Michigan Grade Level Content Expectations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
The School-Age Child4
ECE 191A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of documentation for the CDA credential as outlined by the Council for Professional Recognition. The course is designed to develop the CDA Resource File and prepare students for the Observational Assessment. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 101B, ECE 111B, DHS clearance, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
ECE 165.
CDA Preparation4
General Education Requirements72 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 111A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Scientific Inquiry Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Scientific Inquiry Elective4
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
ENG 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Language and Culture4
GEO 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Philosophy of Ethics4
INF 112
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Word Processing2
INF 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 141A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the use of Microsoft PowerPoint to develop computer-based presentations. Topics include creating slides, handouts, speaker's notes, and outlines as well as the use of PowerPoint Wizards and Templates.

Microsoft PowerPoint2
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
SPN 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication. This course focuses on written and oral comprehension, spoken communication, and cultural understanding. Students are encouraged to communicate through a variety of practices with frequently used structures in everyday situations. Grammatical structures addressed include conjugation of regular and irregular verbs; basics of correct pronunciation, agreement and placement of adjectives, nouns, and articles; and the formation of questions. Primary vocabulary areas covered include numbers, colors, classes, greetings, weather, and dates.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
American Sign Language Minor Requirements (Optional)24 Hours
  • American Sign Language minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Auburn Hills, Flint, Muksegon.
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for grduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ITP 101
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2 Quarter Hours

Studies the variety of cultural experiences and perspectives among people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Topics include the relationship of language and community, audiological vs. cultural deafness, dynamics in families with persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, and the role of the interpreter. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

The Deaf Community2
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
ITP 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills for communicating with Deaf people who sign. Emphasis is on expansion of ASL vocabulary and continued development of expressive and receptive sign skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
American Sign Language II4
ITP 113
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides additional vocabulary and synthesis of grammatical elements of American Sign Language (ASL) through expressive and receptive use of conversational sign language. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 112.
American Sign Language III4
ITP 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on integrating the grammatical components of American Sign Language (ASL) into an expressive means of communication. Promotes and creates an awareness of conversational behaviors used by the Deaf community, and provides practice of those behaviors in the classroom and other settings. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 112.
Expressive Manual Communication2
ITP 131A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides practice in expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills with focus on manual alphabet and numbers. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
Fingerspelling I2
ITP 132A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides advanced instruction and practice in expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 131A.
Fingerspelling II2
ITP 214
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves understanding and fluency of American Sign Language (ASL) with focus on larger informational chunks and short stories. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 113, C or better in ITP 121, C or better in ITP 132A.
American Sign Language IV4
Non-Profit Management Minor (Optional)24 Hours
  • Non-Profit Management Minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Clinton Township, Flint, Jackson, Muskegon, and Owosso.
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 100B
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4 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Elective4
NPMG 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes student understanding of grant writing standards and procedures to plan for writing a grant proposal. The process of developing a grant proposal will be exercised as students write a state, federal, or foundation grant. Exploration of partnerships and alliances will be explored along with the grant budget. Students will understand the grants management process.  Students will have an opportunity to review grant applications for the purpose of understanding and improvement.

Grant Writing4
NPMG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the history of Non-Profits and their role in society. Governance, precisely the role of the board vs. the role of the CEO/President, including planning, ethics, and professional communication will be addressed. Operations management of the Non-Profit vs. the Profit organization and how it is structured will be topics included. Planning for funding is a large part of the Non-Profit coupled with community needs, creativity and innovation, strategic vs. tactical and how the mission of the organization is being followed. The types of funding available for Non-Profits include government grants, corporation grants, donors, and foundations.

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management4
NPMG 312
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes that fund development is the lifeblood of a Non-Profit and how technology, risk assessment, public policy and advocacy play a part will be highlighted. Financial management principles will be addressed as they pertain to philanthropy, government influence, and financial reports. The methodology for fund development will be examined through event planning, fund raising strategies, and the development team. Human Resource management of the Non-Profit is very important in determining a policy manual which addresses the subjects of culture, the volunteer work force, the subject matter expert, and the life-long learner.

Prerequisite(s):
NPMG 311.
Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management II4
NPMG 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with understanding that the mission of the Non-Profit will be communicated through the marketing principles and strategies. The use of media, technology, social networking, and a marketing plan will promote the ideas of the NP. Since event planning is a large part of the promotion plan, attention to the image, branding, professionalism, ethics, and culture will be the focus. Communication strategies for internal/external stakeholders, media relations, cultural competency, and conflict resolution will be addressed.

Marketing and Communication for Non-Profit Organizations4
NPMG 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the history and trends of philanthropy and the laws that impact fund development. Policies for fund development will be constructed and the role of the Board of Directors vs. staff will be outlined. The opportunity for the use of technology used in the fund development will be discussed along with available resources. As operational tasks in fund development are carried out, ethical and professional standards will be discussed including transparency. The challenges to fund development will be addressed including the results vs. the effort in fund raising, strategies, employee burn out, the economy, skilled staff, etc.

Fund Development4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 183

Program Description

This program prepares students for a rewarding career in early childhood education. It will blend higher-level critical applications of the theoretical and practical study of child development and early childhood education in a multitude of professional applications. The Early Childhood Education Bachelor Degree program will require four years of college preparation. The goal of this program is to produce quality early childhood education professionals. Successful graduates may be employed in supervisor and administrative positions, as family advocates, preschool teachers, home visitors, directors, curriculum developers, and child advocates.

This program does NOT lead to elementary (K-12) certification.

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Advisory Board

Wendy McBride
CACS Head Start

Sue Alleman
Perry MSRP

Penny Apsey
Baker College Faculty

Kristin Armbruster
CACS Head Start

Mary Arvoy
The Arc-Shiawassee

Libby Bailey
MSRP - Byron

Emily Brewer
Shiawassee Early Childhood Services

Cindy Bromley
Social Workers, Memorial Healthcare

Jimmica Donald
Department of Human Services

Chrystal Eddy
Shiawassee Community Mental Health

Brook Elliott
Department of Human Services

Lori Ferzo
Department of Human Services

Hope Hause
ReliefAfterViolentEncounters

Jim Haydena
HDI Family Health Center

Deborah Kyle
CACS Head Start

Nicole Lange
Laingsburg MSRP

Paige Lloyd
MSU Extension

Heidi Loynes
Shiawassee Health Department

Cindy McLean
Shiawassee County Health Department

Renita Mikolajczyk
Shiawassee Chamber of Commerce

Tammy Rann
Kid’s Ink

Eric Royston
Baker College Faculty

Ann Saffer
Shiawassee County RESD Early Childhood Learning Center

Joann Sawyer
Noah’s Ark Child Development Center

Monte Sheedlo
Owosso Kiwanis Representative

Cris Sporcic
Catholic Charities

Rhonda Steffs
Shiawassee Early Childhood Services

Cathy Stevenson
Memorial Healthcare

Candis Thick
Shiawassee MSU Extension

Kelda Wilson
CACS Head Start

April Woodruff
MSRP/Corunna Children’s Services

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Mary Clark, Baker College Graduate
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I walked away with knowing I was well prepared to hit the workforce running.

Mary Clark