Create safer communities.

Grow as a leader.

Firefighters protect people and property. Firefighters who move into administrative and leadership positions in the field take a broader look at firefighting, fire prevention and control, and public safety. In addition to supervising and coordinating the work of other firefighters, they develop principles, policies, and practices focused on reducing risks on the job and making communities safer.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
Load More FAQ'S

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirement

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Testimonial quote

During my second semester, I had a job offer, and by the third, I was employed in two different agencies.

Phil Cornelius
Fire Science Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Fire ScienceBachelor of Science in Fire Science

Create safer communities.

Grow as a leader.

Firefighters protect people and property. Firefighters who move into administrative and leadership positions in the field take a broader look at firefighting, fire prevention and control, and public safety. In addition to supervising and coordinating the work of other firefighters, they develop principles, policies, and practices focused on reducing risks on the job and making communities safer.

Discover Your Future Fire Science Career

Career Facts

$53,990

Median salary for Fire Inspectors and Investigators

6%

Estimated employment increase by 2022 for Supervisors of Fire Inspectors and Investigators

$68,210

Median salary for First-line Supervisors of Fire Fighting and Prevention Workers

View citations
Overview

Baker’s Bachelor of Science in Fire Science degree program gives you a broad foundation for advancement to administrative and leadership positions within the fire fighting and public safety field.

In addition to studies in the principles, theories, and practices associated with fire science and public safety, our curriculum covers issues associated with fire safety, fire prevention, and principles of emergency services, as well as topics related to criminal Justice field.

Upon completion of this program, you will be fully certified by the Michigan Firefighting Training Council for Fire Fighter I and II and Hazardous Materials-Operations Level.

Individuals who have completed their State of Michigan Fire Fighter I and II Certification and Medical First Responder will be granted credit for FIRE101, FIRE102, and MFR101.

This degree is designed to be compliant with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) standards established by the National Fire Academy.

Course Information
Fire Science Major Requirements120 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CRJ 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the skills, tools, and methods needed for various criminal justice professions. This course explores philosophical underpinnings of crime and punishments among police, corrections, and the courts. Various ethical and duty related issues are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Criminal Justice4
CRJ 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides content approved by the Michigan State 9-1-1 Committee meeting the requirements for the basic 40 hour dispatcher training program. Topics include telecommunicator roles, public safety overview, professionalism, teamwork, ethics, stress management, call classification, technology, and customer service. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
9-1-1 Telecommunications I4
CRJ 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines normal versus criminal behavior, human development and criminal patterns, specific problems, and intervention strategies. This course explores psychological, sociological, and biological theories of criminal behavior. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminology4
CRJ 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with interpersonal communication and conflict management skills that can be used to manage cooperative and uncooperative individuals in criminal justice environments. Application of the skills will be practiced through the use of role play exercises in simulated situations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Interpersonal Communication and Conflict Management4
CRJ 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the learning opportunity to conduct basic investigations, assessments, interviews, and interrogations which may be necessary in criminal justice settings. Students will practice providing oral summaries, note taking, and computer based report writing in a variety of formats, including logs, client assessments, incident reports, investigation reports, interview summaries, and other related documents. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, Student background check.
Interviewing, Investigations and Report Writing4
CRJ 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines both historical and contemporary methods of policing. An emphasis is placed on ethical behavior along with an introduction of tools, skills, and methods used for effective policing. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Principles of Policing I4
CRJ 281A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students an opportunity to share current experiences to the didactic components of the program. Requires students to perform a minimum of 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a criminal justice agency under the supervision of appropriate personnel to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, PSY 101 or PSY 111, C or better in CRJ 101, minimum GPA 2.50, Sophomore status, Student background check.
Corequisite(s):
WRK 291B.
Criminal Justice Work Experience I4
CRJ 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the history of juvenile justice models and current processing of juvenile offenders. This course will also examine how the processing of juvenile offenders differs from adult offenders and the unique problems associated with juvenile offenders. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Juvenile Justice Concepts4
CRJ 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on foundational ethical principles and theories including the application of ethical decision making as it relates to criminal justice professionals. The societal implications of unethical behavior are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice4
CRJ 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the legal system using classic and contemporary case law to provide a foundation of legal knowledge. The content and impact of several milestone Supreme Court decisions are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminal Law4
CRJ 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of numerous forensic science tools used to investigate criminal activity and the collection of evidence ranging from finger printing to DNA. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Forensic Science4
CRJ 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Instructs the appropriate methods and procedures for collection, handling, documenting, and storing evidence for later use in criminal proceedings. The consequences for mishandling evidence are also explored. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Evidence Collection and Procedures4
CRJ 361
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides historical and contemporary perspectives of organized criminal activity by the mafia and others. White collar crime and corporate corruption are examined along with the social dynamics of youth gangs, violence, prison gangs, and criminality. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Organized Crime and Youth Gangs4
CRJ 371
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the functions, roles, operations, and jurisdictional issues of various local and federal court systems addressing both criminal and civil matters. Includes an examination of various specialized courts to deal with specific societal issues ranging from truancy to substance abuse. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminal Courts4
CRJ 441
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores leadership and change theories and practices within paramilitary organizations and the courts to prepare future leaders within the criminal justice professions. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Organizational Leadership in Criminal Justice4
CRJ 481A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students an opportunity to share current experiences to the didactic components of the program. Requires students to perform a minimum of 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a criminal justice agency under the supervision of appropriate personnel to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CRJ 281A or C or better in WRK 281, minimum GPA 2.50, Senior status, Student background check.
Criminal Justice Work Experience II4
FIRE 101
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10 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of firefighting through a combination of lecture and hands-on learning. The course includes utilizing tools and equipment commonly used by municipal fire departments. Hazardous materials operations level training is a required component. Topics include the basics of fire suppression, apparatus operation, life safety, and physical fitness. This course is sanctioned by the Michigan Fire Fighters Training Council (MFFTC), the firefighter certification agency for the State of Michigan. Completion of this course, along with FIRE102 and medical first responder, will prepare students to take the Michigan Firefighter certification exams.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Fire Academy (Part I)10
FIRE 102
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14 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of firefighting through a combination of lecture and hands-on learning. The course includes utilizing tools and equipment commonly used by municipal fire departments. Topics include advanced fire suppression, aerial operation, life safety, and physical fitness. This course is sanctioned by the Michigan Fire Fighters Training Council (MFFTC), the firefighter certification agency for the State of Michigan. Completion of this course, along with FIRE101 and medical first responder, will prepare students to take the Michigan Firefighter certification exams.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in FIRE 101, Student background check, Program Director/Dean approval.
Fire Academy (Part II)14
FIRE 121
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview to fire protection and emergency services; career opportunities in fire protection and related fields; culture and history of emergency services, fire loss analysis; organization and function of public and private fire protection services, fire departments as part of local government; laws and regulations affecting the fire service; fire service nomenclature; specific fire protection functions; basic fire chemistry and psychics; introduction to fire protection systems; introduction to fire strategy and tactics; life safety initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Principles of Emergency Services4
FIRE 131
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides fundamental knowledge relating to the field of fire prevention. Topics include: history and philosophy of fire prevention; organization and operation of a fire prevention bureau; use and application of codes and standards; plans review; fire inspections; fire and life safety education; and fire investigation.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Fire Prevention4
FIRE 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides information related to the features of design and operation of fire alarm systems, water-based fire suppression systems, special hazard fire suppression systems, water supply for fire protection and portable fire extinguishers.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Fire Protection4
FIRE 151
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides the components of building construction related to firefighter and life safety. The elements of construction and design of structures are shown to be key factors when inspecting buildings, preplanning fire operations, and operating at emergencies.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Building Construction for Fire Protection4
FIRE 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the basic principles and history related to the national firefighter life safety initiatives, focusing on the need for cultural and behavior change throughout the emergency services.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Principles of Fire and Emergency Services, Safety and Survival4
FIRE 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the theories and fundamentals of how and why fires start, spread, and are controlled.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Fire Behavior and Combustion4
MFR 101
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3 Quarter Hours

Provides the education necessary for first responders to provide initial care to people suffering from a variety of medical conditions. This training is first level of EMS recognized by the state of Michigan. This EMS license is typically utilized by Police, Security Agencies, rural Fire Departments, Industrial workers, lifeguards, and search and rescue teams. All students that successfully complete this course will be eligible for NREMT Medical First Responder testing to obtain a state of Michigan MFR License. Students will also receive an American Heart Association Healthcare Provider (CPR) card that is current for two years upon completion.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Medical First Responder3
PSY 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Abnormal Psychology4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
General Education Requirements68 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 111A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Scientific Inquiry Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Scientific Inquiry Elective4
ELECT 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 131B
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 161A
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161B
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161C
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115.
Report Writing4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 188

Program Description

Provides students with the educational background for employment in the fire science area and assists those already employed to obtain credentials for promotional opportunities. The program provides instruction in fire prevention methods, fire behavior, fire protection systems, principles of emergency services, as well as a broad range of Criminal Justice theories and practices. This degree also prepares students in basic fire training, and successful completion leads to certification by the Michigan Firefighting Training Council for Fire Fighter I and II and Hazardous Materials-Operations Level. Individuals who have completed their State of Michigan Fire Fighter I and II Certification and Medical First Responder will be granted credit for FIRE101, FIRE102, and MFR101. This degree is designed to be compliant with the Fire and Emergency Services Higher Education (FESHE) standards established by the National Fire Academy.

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • Load More FAQ'S
Testimonial quote

During my second semester, I had a job offer, and by the third, I was employed in two different agencies.

Phil Cornelius