Apply your skills to lead and inspire.

Help ensure an exceptional customer experience.

Food and beverage managers are responsible for the total management of a food service operation, ensuring customers are fully satisfied with their dining experience. It’s work that requires leadership, customer service skills, sound business judgment, and problem-solving expertise. 

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

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Testimonial - Chef Luis Amado
Testimonial quote

Our students have been extremely successful in competitions…gold medals, best of shows…

Chef Luis Amado
Baking and Pastry Program
Food and Beverage Management Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Food and Beverage ManagementBachelor of Food and Beverage Management

Apply your skills to lead and inspire.

Help ensure an exceptional customer experience.

Food and beverage managers are responsible for the total management of a food service operation, ensuring customers are fully satisfied with their dining experience. It’s work that requires leadership, customer service skills, sound business judgment, and problem-solving expertise. 

Discover Your Future Food and Beverage Management Career

Career Facts

$47,960

Median salary for Food Service Managers

2%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$60,270

Median salary for Food Service Mngr. - Traveler Accommodations

View citations
Overview

Baker’s Food and Beverage Management bachelor degree program focuses on preparing you to manage all aspects of a food and beverage operation.

Our curriculum emphasizes the broad range of knowledge and skills needed for successful operation—from staff selection and dining room management to culinary arts fundamentals and inventory control. In addition to your classroom studies and hands-on lab training, the program gives you real-world experience through internships and other cooperative education opportunities.

As a graduate of our bachelor degree program, you’ll be fully prepared to begin your career in any one of several positions, such as a general food service manager, restaurant and dining room manager, large volume kitchen manager, banquet event and catering director, food service owner/operator, or potential culinary/food and beverage educator.

Course Information
Food and Beverage Management Major Requirements109 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CUL 101
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the food service industry and program expectations. Students will discuss the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the food service industry. Responsible alcohol service will also be emphasized along with the certification testing (TIPs). Additionally, students will begin understanding the impact of sustainability measures in the food service industry. Minimum grade of 'C' or better is required.

Introduction to Food Service and Hospitality2
CUL 110
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students, in depth, to the identification and use of vegetables, fruits, herbs, nuts, grains, dry goods, prepared goods, dairy products, and spices in various forms. Explores both fresh and prepared foods and students learn to identify, receive, store, and hold products. Students will also learn to evaluate products for taste, texture, smell, appearance, and other quality attributes.

Corequisite(s):
CUL 101
Product Identification2
CUL 115A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the math skills needed to calculate percentages, ratios, the metric system, conversion factors, yield tests, recipe conversion and recipe costing as they relate to the food service industry. Students will develop projections and analyze costs in yield tests and recipe pre-costing.

Culinary Math4
CUL 131B
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to food production practices governed by changing federal and state regulations. Topics to be covered include prevention of food-borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. This course utilizes the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® materials, prepares for and culminates with the administration of the National Restaurant Association ServSafe® Certification examination.

Food Safety2
CUL 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the information and skills necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a foodservice establishment. Topics include the flow of goods, income statements, forecasting sales, and controlling labor and food costs. Students will also analyze the complete purchasing cycle of a restaurant, beginning with product and vendor selection and ending with actual orders.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 110
C or better in CUL 115.
Purchasing and Cost Control4
CUL 222A
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8 Quarter Hours

Develops the applications of the principles of fine service and hospitality in an a la carte restaurant serving the public. This class, which will be held in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's restaurant. The course will emphasize customer service, wine and spirits, restaurant trends and sales, merchandising, and sales. Students study and participate in the fundamentals of reservation and point-of-sale systems, controlling inventory, merchandising products and services, managing costs, assuring high-quality service to all customers, and managing service. Students will take the Federation of Dining Room Professionals® certification examination for Certified Dining Room Associate.

Prerequisite(s):
Culinary Majors: CUL 202A or TIPS Certification. Food and Beverage Management Majors: FBM 151 or TIPS Certification.
Table Service8
FBM 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a history, anthropology, and culture studies class about food and beverage, its implications for politics, religion, economics, health and well-being, and esthetics.

The History and Culture of Eating and Drinking4
FBM 121
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6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the fundamental supervisory skills required in the food and beverage management industry. Students will be taught how to identify the quality of food products, how to understand, create, and monitor sanitation systems. Students will participate in the identification and operation of basic kitchen equipment and small wares, identify and evaluate quality and presentation of a la care and banquet food items. During the class students will develop an understanding of skills required to recruit, interview, and hire chefs and kitchen staff, and develop critical thinking skills necessary to address common kitchen issues.

Culinary Fundamentals6
FBM 131
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4 Quarter Hours

Lays the foundation on which the student's ability to manage the daily financial health of his/her restaurant is built. Basic accounting skills of sales and cost management are practiced within a restaurant structured financial system. The course utilizes QuickBooks, a user friendly bookkeeping system which is the basis of many small and large business back office operation.

Accounting for Food and Beverage Managers4
FBM 151
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4 Quarter Hours

Gives students an understanding of the various forms of alcohol along with the tools needed to handle difficult situations in regards to a restaurant or bar patron's consumption of alcohol. Topics that are covered include identifying and classifying spirits, liquor liability, intoxication rate factors, acceptable forms of identification, and documentation of alcohol related incidents.

Liquor Identification and Liabilities4
FBM 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to all aspects of menu development. Students will develop menus start to finish, including, analyzing a business, creating a concept that is appropriate to a theme of a restaurant, and developing a menu appropriate to the theme. Students will utilize industry specific mathematics to cost out menus, and analyze existing menus. Students will learn to analyze a balanced menu based on food cost, labor cost, operating expenses, and extensive market research.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in CUL 115, C or better in CUL 131B.
Menu Planning and Analysis4
FBM 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Gives students the opportunity to apply accounting systems and principles that were taught in FBM131, accounting for food and beverage managers. The class begins with an overview of QuickBooks back office accounting management and how accounting is used to collect and organize data on a shift by shift basis. Principal areas of focus are those systems which most directly impact on, and measure effective shift management. Examples include daily sales recording and breakdown by revenue center, labor scheduling from budget, shift by shift performance review of sales, labor, food and beverage costs, weekly cost center review, proactive management, and action plan creation.

Hospitality Financial Management4
FBM 241
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of a food service operation plan and essential skills needed to manage a variety of food service operations. Emphasis is given on strong leadership skill development, developing front of the house and back of the house teams, staffing, labor cost, human resource management, and creating restaurant long term plans.

Food and Beverage Management4
FBM 251
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the subject of wine, from vineyard to bottle and bottle to table. This survey course explores the world of wine through lectures, tastings, assigned readings, viewings, and projects. Upon successful completion of the course, students will demonstrate basic knowledge of grape growing and wine making; recognition of the main categories of wine, including grape varieties, wine styles and wine growing regions; identify wine attributes by taste; and understand general principles of wine pairing and wine service.

Introduction to Wine4
FBM 255
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces a variety of different beer styles and outlines proper service techniques. Specific examples of service techniques include pouring and serving draught beer, serving bottled beer, proper beer storage, and using beer glassware appropriately. Students in the class will also receive hands-on experience in brewing, brewing equipment, beer ingredients, and beer and food pairing; along with an understanding of normal beer flavors versus off-flavors using a problem solving approach to recognize flavor deterioration.

Beer Styles and Service4
FBM 261
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6 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with a magnitude of drink recipes and drink mixing techniques. Students will not only be able to identify, but will also become comfortable creating classic and original cocktails in this class. This class also explores the world of bar management and supervision; including, but not limited to purchasing, receiving, storing, inventorying, and handling bar supplies and equipment. Bar Management and Mixology will also cultivate proper communication practices between guests, distributors, servers, bartenders, and managers.

Bar Management and Mixology6
FBM 281
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8 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an introductory learning experience in the essentials of food and beverage front of the house management. Focus is given to: guest needs and customer service, cost controls, marketing, forecasting, and focuses on teamwork while analyzing various management styles. Students will attend class lectures and experience day to day management activities in a supervised food service environment. Student must complete 16 hours of lab, 4 hours of lecture, and 4 hours of Blackboard contact each week.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 222A
Restaurant Operations8
FBM 331A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the essentials of food service marketing and focuses on the nature of industry competition, and the importance of customer service. This course identifies how food service management can assess and best serve their target market and support the organization's mission. Marketing principles will be applied to the food service industry through an analysis of marketing mix, marketing strategy, and sales techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
Hospitality Marketing4
FBM 341
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides a global perspective on wine growing and production regions of the world. Includes pairing wine and other spirits with food. Students will become familiarized with the service methods distinct to alcohol and spirits and how to responsibly enjoy them and the laws that govern them. The history, grape growing, fermentation, winemaking operations, and sociology of wine will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 251.
Wine and Viticulture6
FBM 351A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides analysis of banquet planning from initial customer contact to delivery of food and beverage. Focus is given on organizational communication, guest need assessment, cost control, facility layout, and learning ability to multi-task with awareness of all facets of foodservice operation functions.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 281, WRKCM 201
Banquet Meeting and Planning4
FBM 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive analysis of food service human resource management. Facilitates the process of evaluating employees within a hospitality organization through development of appraisal systems, measurement tools, and roles of training and development. Focus is also given on hospitality employment laws, management and labor relations, and social issues within the work environment.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 281
Hospitality Human Resource Management4
FBM 441
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents growth and development of hospitality opportunities while focusing on present status and future trends of the food and lodging industry. Includes special problems of operating small and medium sized establishments. Introduces credit and account procedures, management of staff, marketing, advertising, and security, as well as; the personal attitudes, qualifications and ethics of ownership.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
FBM 131, FBM 231
Hospitality Ownership and Entrepreneurship4
FBM 451A
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes total food service operations management. Students will apply accounting principles to the analysis of financial data in food and beverage operations. Budgeting systems, restaurant profitability, and cost control measures will be covered with an eye toward implementing and building effective management and personnel cost control initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKCM 201
FBM 131, FBM 231
Controlling and Analyzing Foodservice Operational Costs4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
WRK 486A
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4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform a requirement of 400 hours paid or unpaid work experience in an approved off site food service operation. Provides supervised work experience to enable students to apply skills acquired through the food and beverage program. Students will actively participate in management and operation of a food service operation. Students will maintain a detailed journal logging hours in specific competencies. This course is taken during the final quarter of a student's program after completion of prior program requirements.

Food and Beverage Management Externship4
WRKCM 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform 200 hours of unpaid supervised kitchen work experience in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's fine dining restaurant-Courses or other approved location. Students will participate in weekly seminars through Blackboard and demonstrate competencies in required skills. All students will demonstrate competency in requisitioning products, food safety, cost control, multi-tasking, and entry-level management tasks. Baking and Pastry students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including bread and pastry production. Culinary students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including menu development, mise en place, and production. Food and Beverage students will demonstrate competencies in required skills including guest-relations, marketing, food-service accounting, planning, and front-of-the-house management. This course is taken during the final quarter of student's program after completion of prior program requirements.

Work Experience4
General Education Requirements72 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
GEO 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Philosophy of Ethics4
INF 113
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 114A
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Introduction to Database Applications2
INF 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
SCI 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
Education Majors: SPK 201.
Corequisite(s):
EDU 312A. All other majors: PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPN 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication. This course focuses on written and oral comprehension, spoken communication, and cultural understanding. Students are encouraged to communicate through a variety of practices with frequently used structures in everyday situations. Grammatical structures addressed include conjugation of regular and irregular verbs; basics of correct pronunciation, agreement and placement of adjectives, nouns, and articles; and the formation of questions. Primary vocabulary areas covered include numbers, colors, classes, greetings, weather, and dates.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115
Report Writing4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 181

Program Description

This program provides training in the supervision and management of food and beverage operations focusing on food preparation, dining room services, and beverage operations. This program provides a combination of extensive laboratory hands-on training, cooperative work experience, and classroom training. Successful graduates will be prepared for careers as supervisors in food and beverage operations, in restaurants, hotels, hospitals, delis and catering operations, and in corporate food settings. Successful graduates will be prepared to work in such positions as assistant chefs, assistant dining room and/or catering managers, catering and event sales people, assistant managers, assistant food and beverage directors, and as food and beverage owners/operators.

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • Load More FAQ'S
Testimonial - Chef Luis Amado
Testimonial quote

Our students have been extremely successful in competitions…gold medals, best of shows…

Chef Luis Amado
Baking and Pastry Program