General education requirements must be met for all certificates of substantial length (68 or more quarter hours), as well as for associate and bachelor degree programs. Some degree programs may have general education requirements specific to the program that go beyond the basic requirements. Pre-requisites must be met, as required, for each general education course. In most degree programs, the general education requirements are met through general education curriculum. In some programs, however, general education outcomes are met through cognitive experiences, competencies, or application by courses in the major. All graduates must meet the general education outcome requirements established by each academic program.

FAQ'S

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
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General Education RequirementsBachelor

General education requirements must be met for all certificates of substantial length (68 or more quarter hours), as well as for associate and bachelor degree programs. Some degree programs may have general education requirements specific to the program that go beyond the basic requirements. Pre-requisites must be met, as required, for each general education course. In most degree programs, the general education requirements are met through general education curriculum. In some programs, however, general education outcomes are met through cognitive experiences, competencies, or application by courses in the major. All graduates must meet the general education outcome requirements established by each academic program.

Course Information
Communication24 Hours

All of the following.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
Select 2 Courses from the Following

ELECT 121A and ELECT 121B Communication Electives.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis4
ENG 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Language and Culture4
ENG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands students' writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Creative Writing4
ENG 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies theory of behavior in communication in general and in mass media in particular. This course also focuses on the design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communication with an emphasis on the effects that various media have on consumers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Foundations of Mass Communication4
LIT 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies contemporary authors who may be classified as modern or postmodern; figures include principal ethnic and minority writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Contemporary Literature4
LIT 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from colonial times (1600) through the Civil War (1865). American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
American Literature I4
LIT 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from Reconstruction (1865) to the present. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
American Literature II4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115
Report Writing4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
Mathematical Reasoning (One of the Following)8 Hours

Or a higher level math course.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
MTH 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents the application of mathematical skills to business functions to provide students with the basics needed to compute problems in the areas of simple interest, ratios, percentages, compound interest, annuities, and present values.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Mathematics for Business4
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
Select 1 Course from the Following

Or a higher level math course.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
MTH 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, bivariate statistics, and multivariate statistics. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Applied Statistics4
Personal and Social Environments16 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Philosophy of Ethics4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
Select 2 Courses from the Following

ELECT 141A and ELECT 141B Personal and Social Environment Electives.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECN 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics4
ECN 202
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Microeconomics4
POL 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the functions of government at the national, state, and local levels. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies on individuals and businesses. The areas of study include the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, courts, the bureaucracy, the economy, congress, the Presidency, and political parties.

American Political Systems4
PSY 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
PSY 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines changes that occur across the human life span, from conception to old age and death. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Developmental Psychology4
PSY 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology4
PSY 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality4
PSY 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. This course focuses on the understanding adolescents in our society. The emphasis is on behavior development in establishing skills necessary to work with this group. This includes physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Adolescent Psychology4
PSY 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
Computer Literacy8 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
Select 3 Courses from the Following

ELECT 161A, ELECT 161B, and ELECT 161C Computer Literacy Electives.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
INF 112
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Word Processing2
INF 113
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 114A
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Introduction to Database Applications2
INF 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 141A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the use of Microsoft PowerPoint to develop computer-based presentations. Topics include creating slides, handouts, speaker's notes, and outlines as well as the use of PowerPoint Wizards and Templates.

Microsoft PowerPoint2
Global and Cultural Perspective12 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
Select 2 Courses from the Following

ELECT 131A and ELECT 131B Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives.
Any four quarter hour equivalent of a language course (other than English) meets one of the courses for the global and cultural perspectives requirement, other than SOC 321 Cultural Diversity.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECN 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on economic topics of international trade theories including advantages, costs, and barriers to free trade; capital mobility; balance of payments; and foreign exchange markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 201
International Economics4
GEO 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
GEO 102B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and natural environment are studied, along with the historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography II4
HIS 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Women's Studies4
HIS 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations from the period.

World History I4
HIS 352
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from c.300 CE to c.1789 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History II4
HIS 353
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from c.1789 CE to c.1914 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History III4
HIS 354
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments from the twentieth century to the present, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

World History IV4
HIS 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development of emerging nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America with reference to theoretical perspectives such as globalization.

Emerging Nations4
HUM 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)4
HUM 102B
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4 Quarter Hours

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Baroque period to the present are studied.

Art and Architecture II (Baroque to Modern)4
HUM 353
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2 Quarter Hours

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

Corequisite(s):
HUM357 Music Appreciation (2 QH) must be taken simultaneously.
Art Appreciation2
HUM 357
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

Corequisite(s):
HUM353 Art Appreciation (2 QH) must be taken simultaneously.
Music Appreciation2
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
ITP 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills for communicating with Deaf people who sign. Emphasis is on expansion of ASL vocabulary and continued development of expressive and receptive sign skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
American Sign Language II4
POL 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Includes the study of international relations theory, development, and communications as well as American and comparative foreign policy analysis, international law, comparative politics, and peace studies, including conflict resolution and arms control.

International Relations4
SOC 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the values and cultural contexts of global professional settings. Emphasis is on analyzing problems and possible solutions in global interactions.

Global Perspectives4
SPN 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication. This course focuses on written and oral comprehension, spoken communication, and cultural understanding. Students are encouraged to communicate through a variety of practices with frequently used structures in everyday situations. Grammatical structures addressed include conjugation of regular and irregular verbs; basics of correct pronunciation, agreement and placement of adjectives, nouns, and articles; and the formation of questions. Primary vocabulary areas covered include numbers, colors, classes, greetings, weather, and dates.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
SPN 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines major grammatical topics including noun-adjective agreement, reflexive and stem-changing verbs, the present progressive construction, and the past tense. Vocabulary topics include personal care, health, clothing, the home, and travel. Cultural reading is presented to increase comprehension, and class participation is expected.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 101 or 1 year high school Spanish.
Spanish II4
SPN 103
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on helping students become proficient in the Spanish commonly used in the workplace and in the community. Students learn job-specific vocabulary and grammar concepts useful to their careers. Students complete projects in Spanish such as conducting interviews, writing professional correspondence, navigating the Internet, and making presentations. Students learn to narrate using present, past, imperfect, future, and conditional verb tenses.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 102 or 2 years high school Spanish.
Spanish III4
Scientific Inquiry4 Hours

ELECT 111A Scientific Inquiry Elective.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SCI 101C
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5 Quarter Hours

Deals with the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Anatomy and Physiology I5
SCI 111
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5 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to basic biological concepts. Topics include classification of plants and animals, cell theory, cell structure, plant and animal tissues and organs, nutritional requirements of plants and animals, energy metabolism, and use of basic biology laboratory techniques and equipment. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Biology5
SCI 215
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 124
Integrated Physics4
SCI 220A
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5 Quarter Hours

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A 20 hour laboratory will be a component of this course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture.

Microbiology5
SCI 246
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in MTH 108 or B- or better in MTH 111.
Chemistry I4
SCI 251
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes classical mechanics. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 141
General Physics I4
SCI 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

Principles of Astronomy4
SCI 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science4
Mission & Goals

The mission of Baker College is to provide quality higher education and training which enable graduates to be successful throughout challenging and rewarding careers. Required courses in the major field of study are complemented and enhanced by required general education courses. General education provides a foundation of knowledge and skills that every educated person should possess. Its purpose is to stimulate curiosity and promote intellectual inquiry and lifelong learning.

General Education Mission Statement
General education provides students with an array of critical skills and knowledge essential to the college-educated person in any career path and builds a foundation for more specialized learning.

General Education Goals

  1. To provide students with opportunities to develop and refine essential skills in written and oral communication, mathematical reasoning, scientific inquiry, global and cultural awareness, personal and social relations, and information literacy
  2. To teach a body of common knowledge necessary for students to be successful in professional, intellectual, and social contexts
  3. To assist students in developing a breadth of knowledge, curiosity, and critical thinking skills
  4. To promote informed citizenship in an increasingly diverse world
  5. To advocate lifelong learning
Institutional Student Learning Outcomes

Baker College Institutional Student Learning Outcomes are the General Education Outcomes:

  1. Career-ready knowledge and skills
  2. Attitudes and behaviors that promote success in the workplace and effective social interaction with diverse people
  3. Information literacy which includes recognizing the need for information and identifying, locating, evaluating, and effectively using that information 
  4. Effective communication in various academic and career settings using technology as appropriate
  5. Critical thinking including analysis, synthesis, and problem solving which are applicable to the field of study, the workplace, and other life situations
  6. Broad-based knowledge which includes an understanding of cultural, ethical, social, political, and global issues

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Ashley Hawkins Baker College Graduate
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Here you learn from what you do… very hands on.

Ashley Hawkins