Help people overcome problems.

Improve lives.

For those who want to help improve people’s lives, human services can be a very rewarding field in which to work. The work of human services professionals centers around helping people cope with their everyday lives. It may involve personal or family problems, or it may relate to a disability, disease or problem, such as substance abuse or inadequate housing.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

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Cheryl Holland, Baker College Graduate
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

I get to do what I love to do. What I was born to do. Because of my experience at Baker College.

Cheryl Holland
Human Services Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Human ServicesBachelor of Human Services

Help people overcome problems.

Improve lives.

For those who want to help improve people’s lives, human services can be a very rewarding field in which to work. The work of human services professionals centers around helping people cope with their everyday lives. It may involve personal or family problems, or it may relate to a disability, disease or problem, such as substance abuse or inadequate housing.

Discover Your Future Human Services Career

Career Facts

$28,850

Median salary for Social and Human Service Assistants

22%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$59,970

Median salary for Social and Community Service Managers

View citations
Overview

Baker’s Human Services bachelor degree program provides a solid foundation that prepares you to provide a range of services for people in many different circumstances, and to work in concert with professionals in other fields, such as psychology or rehabilitation to help people overcome their personal problems.

Our curriculum combines psychology and human service courses to give you an understanding of different social problems and the techniques and methods that can be used to resolve them. Through your class work and internship opportunities, you develop a variety of skills, ranging from communication to problem-solving, that enable you to work successfully with a diverse population of people.

As a program graduate, you’ll be prepared for any one of several career opportunities, such as case manager, direct-service social worker, mental health team member, shelter personnel, or a direct care provider or supervisor.

Course Information
Human Services Major131 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HUS 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Serves as an overview of the historical developments in the field of human service and provides an introduction to the philosophical framework, the major theoretical models, and the interdisciplinary nature of human service. Students will explore human service occupations, professional organizations, community resources, and ethical and legal issues. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Human Services4
HUS 121
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a healthy foundation of knowledge and skills for building strong relationships and families. This course emphasizes family strengths, the benefits that come from diversity, and the fact that families are systems of relationships. These systems interact within themselves and are also influenced by society at large. The concepts and ideas presented are directly applicable to students' lives as well as their future professional work. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Family Dynamics4
HUS 131B
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2 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with available human service resources including those that are governmentally based, private sector based, and community service affiliated. Particular emphasis will be placed on client definition, needs assessment, eligibility requirements, and the referral process. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Human Services Resources2
HUS 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the etiology, prevalence, and treatment of different types of neglect and violence in families across the lifespan. This course will explore abusive and neglectful behaviors, evidence of signs and symptoms of neglect and abusive patterns, and identify appropriate reporting procedures. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 101B, student background check.
Abuse and Neglect in the Family4
HUS 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the types of substance abuse prevalent in communities, factors that lead to substance abuse and the impact on families, the workplace, and society in general. This course introduces students to current treatment programs and their various philosophies. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Substance Abuse4
HUS 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Teaches students how to conduct a client assessment, including interviewing and appropriate manual- and computer-based recording and reporting of client records in to an organized and comprehensive assessment report. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 241
C or better in HUS 131B, C or better in HUS 201, student background check.
Assessment, Recording, and Reporting4
HUS 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes prevention and intervention strategies for less severe cases in human services. Students will learn parenting skills, listening skills, planning, assessment of community resources, referral procedures, general crisis intervention, and setting appropriate boundaries in his/her role as a case manager. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Human Services and Gerontology majors: C or better in HUS 211, Corrections majors: CRJ 221, All majors: student background check.
Corequisite(s):
HUS 231
Case Management I4
HUS 231
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2 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the assessment of diverse crisis situations with emphasis on the use of short-term intervention and problem-solving techniques to help individuals and families de-escalate crisis situations and develop appropriate coping techniques. This course will address the A-B-C Model of Intervention, brief and short-term interventions, and multicultural issues in crisis intervention situations. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 141, student background check.
Corequisite(s):
HUS 221
Crisis Intervention2
HUS 271A
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6 Quarter Hours

Consists of 125 clock hours of paid/unpaid, experience in a social service or mental health agency in the community under supervision of agency and Baker College staff. The students will also be required to complete 20 hours in seminar format, to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. This course is the beginning internship required of all human service majors in both the associate's and bachelor's degree programs. The primary focus of this internship is the development and application of knowledge and skills in community resources. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
C or better in HUS 101B, C or better in HUS 131B, minimum GPA 2.50, Program Director/Dean approval, student background check.
Human Services Internship I6
HUS 292A
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops specific skills to support and strengthen families, including interviewing and communication skills, assessing family needs and strengths, eliciting relevant cultural information, formulation of family support plans and appropriate outcomes, problem-solving strategies, recordkeeping, making referrals, and resolving ethical dilemmas. The approach is a family-centered, solution-focused model of integrated family services. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 121, student background check.
Family Support Strategies4
HUS 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines research and theory within the human services community. For students to become a consumer of research, topics such as grant writing, ethics in research, research design and application, and using research results in a variety of human services communities will be addressed. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 211, MTH 109 or MTH 112, student background check.
Research Methods in Human Services4
HUS 321A
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to human service supervision and management at the first-line level. Students will attain an understanding of organizational management perspectives on staff motivation and administrative planning in human service agencies and organizations, including a review of professional and governmental agency standards. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 101B, student background check.
Human Services Administration I4
HUS 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to a survey of child welfare services. Topics include family support, protecting abused and neglected children, foster care, delinquency, adoption, and family court process. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 131B, C or better in HUS 141, student background check.
Child Welfare Services4
HUS 371A
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6 Quarter Hours

Consists of 125 clock hours of paid/unpaid, experience in a social service or mental health agency in the community under the supervision of agency and Baker College staff. The students will also be required to complete 20 hours in seminar format, to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. This course is the second internship required for all Human Service majors in the associate's degree and bachelor's degree programs. The primary focus of this internship is the development of case management plans to treat identified problems. Students will observe agency staff and assist in client assessment, reporting, and recording. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 271A, minimum GPA 2.50, Program Director/Dean approval, student background check.
Human Services Internship II6
HUS 403
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the Community-Counseling Model for the delivery of mental health services. Topics include preventive education, outreach to vulnerable populations, client advocacy, facilitating specialized groups, and the provision of services within the client's community. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 411
student background check.
Mental Health Services4
HUS 411A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive examination of various placement and treatment environments from the most restrictive setting to independent living. This course considers diagnostic criteria and a variety of conditions under which institutional placement and other treatment alternatives are indicated relative to particular case situations and case monitoring of clients in these settings. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 221, student background check.
Institutional Treatment and Alternative Settings in Human Services4
HUS 412
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes prevention and intervention strategies for more severe cases. Students will learn how to coordinate interventions for clients with multiple and complex problems, determine when to make referrals to social and legal agencies, facilitate the reintegration of families, intervene in crisis situations, and conduct evaluations for licensing of alternative home placements. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 221, student background check.
Case Management II4
HUS 421A
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to human service management and administration at the middle and upper management levels. This course also presents an evaluation and analysis of major components in human service delivery systems, including budgeting, program evaluation, employee relations, in-service training programs, and collaboration among agencies and organizations. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 321A, student background check.
Human Services Administration II4
HUS 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the multiaxial diagnostic system for the classification of mental disorders and explores the 17 major categories of mental disorders. Students will learn to differentiate various forms of psychopathology, evaluate alternative interventions, and develop proficiency in the language used by a variety of professionals to communicate about mental health and human services problems. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 311
student background check.
The DSM System4
HUS 441
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the history and philosophy of home visitation interviewing, establishing positive relationships and professional boundaries with clients, developing helping skills, and addressing the needs of high risk families. This course identifies and explores issues relevant to supporting a wide range of families through home visiting. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 211, C or better in HUS 292A, student background check.
Home Visitation2
HUS 471A
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6 Quarter Hours

Consists of 125 clock hours of paid/unpaid, experience in a social service or mental health agency in the community under the supervision of agency and Baker College staff. The students will also be required to complete 20 hours in seminar format, to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. This is the third and final internship required for all Human Service bachelor degree students. The primary focus of this internship is the development of knowledge and skills in treatment planning and intervention. Students will observe and participate in the treatment planning process and assist in the implementation of interventions and preventions with process and outcome documentation. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HUS 371A, minimum GPA 2.50, Program Director/Dean approval, student background check.
Human Services Internship III6
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
PSY 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the background, theoretical underpinnings, and process of cognitive behavior therapy. Topics include maladaptive thought patterns and cognitive behavior therapy solutions, several expressions of cognitive behavior therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy applications to common problems such as fear, anger, addiction, and depression.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111
Cognitive-Behavior Therapy4
PSY 241
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding the field of counseling. This course examines what counselors do; the qualities of effective counseling; and basic concepts of the most influential theories of modern counseling, considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. It also examines legal, ethical, and cross-cultural issues.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111
Theories of Counseling4
PSY 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Abnormal Psychology4
PSY 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores types of disabilities from the individual, family, and caregiver perspectives. Topics include stereotypes and myths, legal issues/laws, coping with disability, and models of practice. Common challenges and solutions associated with disability across various social contexts are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Disability4
PSY 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on theories and research in human development from conception to puberty. Selected topics include physical, language, intellectual, moral, personality, and socio-emotional development.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Human Development I4
PSY 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the theories and research in human development from adolescence to old age and death. Topics covered include physical, cognitive, personality, and socio-emotional development, as well as identity development, relationships, education/careers, and retirement. The concept of stability and change throughout adulthood will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Human Development II4
PSY 405
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2 Quarter Hours

Studies the history and development of psychopharmacological agents, their effects on the biochemistry of the human being, the legitimate use of medications, and their importance for treatment. Topics include a review of the classes of psychotropic drugs, drug overdose, the side effects and interactions of psychotropic drugs, and drug tolerance.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 311
Psychopharmacology2
PSY 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the multiple careers and settings associated with mental health treatment. Topics include assessment, interviewing, types of counseling, treatment of different populations, legal issues, and ethical considerations within the mental health treatment setting. Treatment interventions, least restrictive options, and prevention will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 311
Clinical Methods in Mental Health4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
General Education Requirements64 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 111A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Scientific Inquiry Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Scientific Inquiry Elective4
ELECT 121A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective4
ELECT 121B
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective4
ELECT 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 131B
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 161A
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161B
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161C
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
PSY 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
PSY 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality4
PSY 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
Education Majors: SPK 201.
Corequisite(s):
EDU 312A. All other majors: PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
Adult Instructor and Trainer Minor (Optional)24 Hours
  • Adult instructor and trainer minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Clinton Township, Flint, Jackson, Muskegon, Owosso
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
AIT 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Helps participants become more reflective and effective teachers.

Teaching and Learning4
AIT 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Helps participants develop a better understanding of learning in adulthood.

The Adult Learner4
AIT 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes theory of instruction, methods, and materials/resources necessary in the subject area.

Instructional Strategies and Delivery4
AIT 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on techniques that lead to development of a positive, democratic learning environment.

Classroom/Instructional Management4
AIT 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Compares different types of assessments and analyzes assessment results for the purpose of improving student learning. Students will compare classroom assessment techniques to program assessments and incorporate results into program evaluation and accreditation. The instruction in the course will emphasize creating valid assessments and using assessment data for decision making.

Assessment for Student Learning4
AIT 491
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides hands-on capstone experience in teaching or training setting. Students will practice teaching and will reflect on the teaching-learning process. Continuous improvement of instructional skills will be emphasized, while incorporating adult learning theory, classroom management, curriculum and assessment.

Adult Instructor and Trainer Practicum4
Criminal Justice Minor (Optional)24 Hours
  • Criminal Justine minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Clinton Township, Jackson, Muskegon, Owosso
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CRJ 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the skills, tools, and methods needed for various criminal justice professions. This course explores philosophical underpinnings of crime and punishments among police, corrections, and the courts. Various ethical and duty related issues are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Criminal Justice4
CRJ 106
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the philosophy and history of corrections. This course also includes the development of current forms and approaches to corrections including probation, parole, security concepts, and related agencies. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Introduction to Corrections4
CRJ 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines normal versus criminal behavior, human development and criminal patterns, specific problems, and intervention strategies. This course explores psychological, sociological, and biological theories of criminal behavior. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminology4
CRJ 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines both historical and contemporary methods of policing. An emphasis is placed on ethical behavior along with an introduction of tools, skills, and methods used for effective policing. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Principles of Policing I4
CRJ 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on foundational ethical principles and theories including the application of ethical decision making as it relates to criminal justice professionals. The societal implications of unethical behavior are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice4
CRJ 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the legal system using classic and contemporary case law to provide a foundation of legal knowledge. The content and impact of several milestone Supreme Court decisions are also examined. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Student background check.
Criminal Law4
Early Childhood Education Minor (Optional)24 Hours
  • Early Childhood Education minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Clinton Township, Flint, Jackson, Muskegon, Owosso, Port Huron
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECE 111B
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on typical and atypical developmental milestones of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of children from birth to age 12 with a focus on the preschool years. Theories of child development and contributions of theorists are reviewed in the context of application to developmental milestones. The effects that multiple, interrelated environmental factors have on the growth and development of the child will be explored. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Childhood Development4
ECE 165
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmentally appropriate, ethical assessment of preschool children. Students will participate in hands-on child evaluation and practice developing assessment documents for parents and institutions for the purposes of determining current levels of functioning and directing curriculum development. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of the referral process for IEPs and IFSPs, and the roles of the teachers, parents and helping professional in these processes. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B
DHS clearance, student background check. MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Observation and Assessment Techniques for Early Childhood Education Programs4
ECE 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on typical and atypical social and emotional development of children birth to age 12. After reviewing assessment strategies, students will review the process for additional consultation and/or referral for children displaying atypical development, including referrals to Child Protective Services for suspected abuse or neglect. Students will apply child development theories and research through development of curriculum that enhances each child's social skills as an individual and through community group building activities. Includes 20 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B
DHS clearance, student background check.
Guidance and Discipline4
ECE 281
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on information and strategies that can be used by teachers to encourage parents to work in partnership with schools. Promoting holistic child development with the parent in the role of the teacher in the home and community with the teacher as support to the parent is explored. The teacher's role as a child advocate through mandated reporting for child abuse or neglect and family advocate through the IEP/IFSP process is reviewed. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B
DHS clearance, student background check.
Parents and Teachers: Partners in Education4
ECE 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on strategies for Early Childhood Education professionals to use community resources for the development of the rights of young children and their families. Addresses working with children suffering from abuse and neglect. Develops advocacy techniques on behalf of children promoting safe, healthy, and nutritional environments. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
Advocating for Young Children4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECE 151A
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the essential organization, planning, operations, legal issues related to children and staff and ongoing quality improvement of child care centers and preschool environments. Licensing, program structure, and accreditation standards, including professionalism and ethics are reviewed. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 111B
DHS clearance, student background check.
Administration of Early Childhood Programs4
ECE 181
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on developmental milestones and curricular planning for school-age children (5-12 years or kindergarten through 5th grade) as they relate to out of school program planning. This coursework includes instructional strategies that link the school-age curriculum and planning to State of Michigan Grade Level Content Expectations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHS clearance, student background check.
The School-Age Child4
ECE 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a supervised fieldwork experience in an administrative role that focuses on leadership and management techniques. Includes 120 hours of participation in a quality licensed program for birth-five year olds. Must complete with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 151A, ECE 271B
Program Director/Dean approval, DHS clearance, student background check.
Early Childhood Education Practicum III4
American Sign Language Minor (Optional)24 Hours
  • American Sign Language minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Flint, Muskegon
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ITP 101
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2 Quarter Hours

Studies the variety of cultural experiences and perspectives among people who are deaf or hard of hearing. Topics include the relationship of language and community, audiological vs. cultural deafness, dynamics in families with persons who are deaf or hard of hearing, and the role of the interpreter. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

The Deaf Community2
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
ITP 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills for communicating with Deaf people who sign. Emphasis is on expansion of ASL vocabulary and continued development of expressive and receptive sign skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
American Sign Language II4
ITP 113
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides additional vocabulary and synthesis of grammatical elements of American Sign Language (ASL) through expressive and receptive use of conversational sign language. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 112.
American Sign Language III4
ITP 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on integrating the grammatical components of American Sign Language (ASL) into an expressive means of communication. Promotes and creates an awareness of conversational behaviors used by the Deaf community, and provides practice of those behaviors in the classroom and other settings. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 112.
Expressive Manual Communication2
ITP 131A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides practice in expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills with focus on manual alphabet and numbers. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
Fingerspelling I2
ITP 132A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides advanced instruction and practice in expressive and receptive fingerspelling skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 131A.
Fingerspelling II2
ITP 214
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves understanding and fluency of American Sign Language (ASL) with focus on larger informational chunks and short stories. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 113, C or better in ITP 121, C or better in ITP 132A.
American Sign Language IV4
Non-Profit Management Minor (Optional)20 Hours
  • Non-Profit Management minor available at the following Baker College campuses: Allen Park, Auburn Hills, Cadillac, Clinton Township, Flint, Jackson, Muskegon, Owosso, Port Huron
  • The credit hours for this minor are not included in the quarter hours required for graduation listed below.
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
NPMG 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes student understanding of grant writing standards and procedures to plan for writing a grant proposal. The process of developing a grant proposal will be exercised as students write a state, federal, or foundation grant. Exploration of partnerships and alliances will be explored along with the grant budget. Students will understand the grants management process.  Students will have an opportunity to review grant applications for the purpose of understanding and improvement.

Grant Writing4
NPMG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the history of Non-Profits and their role in society. Governance, precisely the role of the board vs. the role of the CEO/President, including planning, ethics, and professional communication will be addressed. Operations management of the Non-Profit vs. the Profit organization and how it is structured will be topics included. Planning for funding is a large part of the Non-Profit coupled with community needs, creativity and innovation, strategic vs. tactical and how the mission of the organization is being followed. The types of funding available for Non-Profits include government grants, corporation grants, donors, and foundations.

Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management4
NPMG 312
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes that fund development is the lifeblood of a Non-Profit and how technology, risk assessment, public policy and advocacy play a part will be highlighted. Financial management principles will be addressed as they pertain to philanthropy, government influence, and financial reports. The methodology for fund development will be examined through event planning, fund raising strategies, and the development team. Human Resource management of the Non-Profit is very important in determining a policy manual which addresses the subjects of culture, the volunteer work force, the subject matter expert, and the life-long learner.

Prerequisite(s):
NPMG 311.
Fundamentals of Non-Profit Management II4
NPMG 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with understanding that the mission of the Non-Profit will be communicated through the marketing principles and strategies. The use of media, technology, social networking, and a marketing plan will promote the ideas of the NP. Since event planning is a large part of the promotion plan, attention to the image, branding, professionalism, ethics, and culture will be the focus. Communication strategies for internal/external stakeholders, media relations, cultural competency, and conflict resolution will be addressed.

Marketing and Communication for Non-Profit Organizations4
NPMG 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the history and trends of philanthropy and the laws that impact fund development. Policies for fund development will be constructed and the role of the Board of Directors vs. staff will be outlined. The opportunity for the use of technology used in the fund development will be discussed along with available resources. As operational tasks in fund development are carried out, ethical and professional standards will be discussed including transparency. The challenges to fund development will be addressed including the results vs. the effort in fund raising, strategies, employee burn out, the economy, skilled staff, etc.

Fund Development4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 195

Program Description

This program prepares students to enter into jobs as case managers, mental health team members for in-home programs, state social service workers, direct care providers or supervisors in residential settings, shelter personnel, and other mental health or social service positions. This program combines general education with training for competency in the field of human service in order for graduates to be prepared in their chosen fields of study and to continually enhance their own personal and professional growth.

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Cheryl Holland, Baker College Graduate
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I get to do what I love to do. What I was born to do. Because of my experience at Baker College.

Cheryl Holland