Apply your know-how.

Change things for the better.

Industrial engineers are the gurus of continuous improvement. They work in manufacturing, service industries, healthcare organizations, shipping and logistics, and other organizations. Applying their analytical skills, engineering expertise, and a broad business background, they focus on improving productivity and efficiency, while reducing costs, without compromising safety or the quality of products and services.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

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There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

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Joshua Steere, Baker College graduate
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

[Baker] really helps to develop the critical thinking that's necessary in this field.

Joshua Steere
Industrial Engineering Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Industrial EngineeringBachelor of Science in Industrial Engineering

Apply your know-how.

Change things for the better.

Industrial engineers are the gurus of continuous improvement. They work in manufacturing, service industries, healthcare organizations, shipping and logistics, and other organizations. Applying their analytical skills, engineering expertise, and a broad business background, they focus on improving productivity and efficiency, while reducing costs, without compromising safety or the quality of products and services.

Discover Your Future Industrial Engineering Career

Career Facts

$78,860

Median salary for Industrial Engineers

5%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$124,870

Median salary for Architectural and Engineering Managers

View citations
Overview

The Industrial Engineering program at Baker prepares you for involvement in a broad range of industries where the efficiency of people, machines, materials, and information are critical to the success of the organization. 

In our program, which combines classroom studies with hands-on labs and internship experience, you learn how to apply your knowledge of math, science, and engineering to identify and formulate problems, design appropriate solutions, develop and conduct experiments, and analyze and interpret data. At the same time, you develop complementary skills in communication, teamwork, and ethical responsibility to prepare you for today’s workplaces. 

As a program graduate, you’ll be prepared to begin your career, ready to help improve integrated systems in diverse areas such as computers, education, financial services, government, healthcare, and manufacturing organizations.

Course Information
Industrial Engineering Major145 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CQI 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops a working knowledge and skills in basic Statistical Process Control (SPC) which includes process data collection, display, interpretation, and application to improve the overall quality of a process system. Topics include quality responsibility, quality improvement techniques; fundamentals of statistics; control charts for variables; and process capability. Students will conduct a quality improvement project that is work related which applies the SPC tools discussed in this course.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 111 or acceptance in the program.
Statistical Process Control I4
CQI 312
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops a working knowledge and skills in basic Statistical Process Control (SPC) which includes process data collection, display, interpretation, and application to improve the overall quality of a process system. Topics include variable control charting, capability study development, techniques for batch processes and short runs, fundamentals of probability, attribute control charting, acceptance sampling, reliability, and measurement variation. Students will conduct a quality improvement project that is work related which applies the SPC tools discussed in this course.

Prerequisite(s):
CQI 311.
Statistical Process Control II4
CQI 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops a working knowledge and skills in Advanced Statistical Process Control (SPC), which includes hypothesis testing, statistical estimation, single factor design of experiments, multifactor design of experiments, multilevel design of experiments, orthogonal arrays, the loss of function, and the concept of analysis of variance.

Prerequisite(s):
CQI 311.
Design of Experiments4
ECN 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics4
EET 111A
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces electrical fundamentals, including nomenclature, symbols, SI units, and schematic diagrams. Covers conductors, voltage, current, resistance, and power. Uses Ohm's Law, Watt's Law, and Kirchhoff's Voltage Law to analyze series circuits and voltage dividers. Emphasizes hands-on lab experiments in building and measuring circuits using a breadboard, multimeter, and power supply.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 091 or satisfies developmental essential math concepts or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Electrical Technology4
EGR 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys the use of drafting instruments and computers to generate the necessary geometry for design, analysis, and manufacturing. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Engineering Graphics4
EGR 105
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys the profession of engineering through analysis and design problem-solving examples. This course also introduces students to engineering sketching.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 124.
Introduction to Engineering and Design4
EGR 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to communicate technical information in written, digital and oral forms in an effective manner to a variety of audiences. Use of supporting computer software is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Technical Communications for Engineering Sciences4
EGR 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the foundations of engineering economy. Students will develop an understanding and the ability to work problems that account for the time value of money, cash flow, and equivalence at different interest rates. The techniques are mastered from the basis of how an engineer in any discipline can take economic value into account in virtually any project environment. Eight factors commonly used in engineering economy computations are introduced and applied. One or more engineering alternatives are formulated to solve a problem or provide specified results. Different methods by which one or more alternatives can be evaluated economically using factors and formulas learned.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 112 or MTH 131.
Engineering Economy I4
ISE 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the relationship between product engineering and manufacturing engineering. Casting processes, bulk deformation processes, sheet metal processes, mechanics of material removal processes, non-traditional machining, plastics and powder metallurgy, fastening and joining methods, design for manufacturing, and the factory of the future are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 124.
Manufacturing Processes4
ISE 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the principles of systems engineering for accomplishing organizational goals in manufacturing and service industries. This course includes capabilities, productivity measurement, work and methods study, process planning, and design for productivity enhancement. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 311.
Introduction to Industrial and Systems Engineering4
ISE 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Teaches students to effectively utilize methods analysis tools and techniques in the design and improvement of manufacturing systems and to apply work measurement techniques in the appropriate situations.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 331, MTH 401.
Work Analysis and Design4
ISE 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Allows bachelor's degree students in engineering or technology to gain experience in their major field while attending college. Students will complete a minimum of 120-hours of work experience. Requires work assignments related to academic and career goals with progressively greater responsibilities. Includes a written report describing the work experience and its educational benefits.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior or senior status, minimum GPA 2.50.
Industrial Cooperative Education4
ISE 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the integration of computers in the manufacturing process. This course includes such concepts of Computer Integrated Manufacturing (CIM) as: production planning, robotics, industrial automation, CAD/CAM, and design for CIM manufacturability. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
one level of 3-D modeling.
Computer Integrated Manufacturing4
ISE 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a scientific approach to decision making that involves the operations of organizational systems and is applied to problems that concern how to conduct and coordinate the operations or activities within an organization. The process begins by carefully observing and formulating the problem and then constructing a scientific (typically mathematical) model that attempts to abstract the essence of the real problem in the context of the entire system. Operations research solutions yield an optimal value of the system measure of desirability. Topics include: linear programming, network analysis, dynamic programming, probability theory, queuing theory, inventory theory, reliability, and decision analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 112.
Introduction to Operations Research4
ISE 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the techniques for achieving organizational goals in the design of manufacturing and service facilities. Includes plant location, building design, plant layout, and material handling.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 335.
Facilities Design4
ISE 491
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes project management strategies for planning and assignment of work, estimating hours for project completion, tracking for progress and change in job requirements. This course includes critical path scheduling, resource allocation, and client/customer interface. Students may not receive credit for both ISE491 and ME491.

Prerequisite(s):
Senior status, EGR 321.
Engineering Project Management4
ISE 498
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2 Quarter Hours

Continues the topics in ISE491 (Engineering Project Management) and utilizes concepts from industrial engineering courses to complete a design project and prepare an engineering report on the design. This is a capstone course where students work in teams. Students may not receive credit for both ISE498 and ME498.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 491.
Senior Design Project I2
ISE 499A
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2 Quarter Hours

Continues the topics in ISE498 to complete a design project and prepare an engineering report on the design. This is the second course in the capstone design course sequence. Students may not receive credit for both ME499A and ISE499A.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 498.
Senior Design Project II2
LNM 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the Six Sigma methodology to ensure customer satisfaction and ensure profitability. Six Sigma is a world class, fact based, system approach for both administrative and manufacturing operations. Students will follow the five phase D-M-A-I-C process in two unique case studies. This course will help prepare students to obtain Green Belt certification.

Six Sigma Basics-Green Belt4
ME 107
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to 3-D computer aided design modeling techniques using industry typical software. Builds on connection between 2-D drawings/sketches and 3-D solid modeling. Introduces concepts of projects, parts, libraries, catalogs, and other topics related to industry application of CAD programs.

Introduction to 3-D Modeling4
ME 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the basic principles of mechanics with engineering applications. This course includes concepts of vectors; moments and couples; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; free body diagrams; analysis of trusses, frames, machines, and beams; centroids and moments of inertia.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 141, SCI 215 or SCI 251.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 142.
Statics4
ME 281
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the principles of engineering materials. This course covers the correlation of the internal structure and service conditions with the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of metals, polymers, and ceramics. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 247.
Materials Science4
ME 350
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the natural laws of work. This topic deals with the minimization of the hazards and maximization of the efficiency of the work system in which the human is a part. The scope of this system can be as simple as a carpenter and a hammer or as complicated as the control system of a nuclear power plant.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 105, ME 201.
Ergonomics for Engineers4
MGT 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates the developmental role of the modern manager. Areas covered in the course are planning, decision making, forecasting, goal-setting, motivation, communication, staffing, and utilizing problem-solving concepts through group simulation and case studies.

Management and Supervision4
MTH 124
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes trigonometric functions, their properties, solution of right and oblique triangles, radian measure, graphs, trigonometric equations, and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 112.
Trigonometry4
MTH 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems.

Prerequisite(s):
Education majors: MTH 140. All other majors: B- or better in MTH 124.
Calculus I4
MTH 142
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on antiderivatives, the process of integration, logarithmic and exponential functions, inverse trigonometric functions, simple differential equations, and applications of integration such as area and volume.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 141.
Calculus II4
MTH 143
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on techniques of integration, improper integrals, testing sequences for convergence or divergence, the development and application of a Taylor or Maclaurin series, and the application of calculus techniques to conic sections, parametric equations, and polar equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 142.
Calculus III4
MTH 244
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4 Quarter Hours

Includes topics such as functions of several variables, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and three space vectors.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 143.
Calculus IV4
MTH 261
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to linear algebra including algebra of matrices, vectors in space, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues, linear transformations, and the applications of matrix methods to find solutions to systems of linear equations and linear programming problems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 143.
Linear Algebra4
MTH 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to data analysis, data-driven decision making, and various statistical methods including their applications. Methods covered include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, sampling, and regression analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 109 or MTH 112.
Statistical Methods4
SCI 247
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands the principles of Chemistry I to include an in-depth investigation of quantum numbers and the study of precipitation, neutralization, and redox reactions. Also included is the investigation of molecular structures and the concept of chemical equilibrium. Students are also introduced to electrochemical principles and nuclear chemistry. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 246.
Chemistry II4
SCI 251
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes classical mechanics. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 141.
General Physics I4
SCI 253
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes oscillatory motion, heat and thermodynamics, optics, and modern developments. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 251.
General Physics III4
SCI 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
EGR 322
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4 Quarter Hours

Reviews the principles of Engineering Economy I to extend the use of economic evaluation tools in real-world situations. Replacement analysis is performed and applied to the evaluation tools to make the correct economic choice. Breakeven analysis is introduced and used to assist in the economic evaluation of process. The effects of inflation, depreciation, income taxes in all types of studies, and indirect costs are incorporated into the methods previously performed in Engineering Economy I. An expanded version of sensitivity analysis is developed, and students will formulate the approach to examine parameters that vary over a predictable range of values. The elements of risk and probability are considered using expected values, probabilistic analysis, and Monte Carlo - based computer simulation.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 321.
Engineering Economy II4
ISE 435
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the understanding of manufacturing as a production system. This course recognizes the challenges associated with the flow of the production system and allows students to understand and apply principles and practices of lean manufacturing. The Toyota Production System is used as an example of a lean production system.

Prerequisite(s):
ISE 335.
Manufacturing Strategies4
General Education Requirements64 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Philosophy of Ethics4
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
PSY 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology4
SCI 246
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in MTH 108 or B- or better in MTH 111.
Chemistry I4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SOC 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the values and cultural contexts of global professional settings. Emphasis is on analyzing problems and possible solutions in global interactions.

Global Perspectives4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115.
Report Writing4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 209

Program Description

Industrial engineers work in manufacturing, service industries, entertainment industries, healthcare organizations, shipping and logistics, and many other organizations. They focus on improving productivity and efficiency, and reducing costs while ensuring the quality of products and services, as well as the safety of the workplace. Industrial engineers often transition to managerial positions due to their combined engineering and business background and exposure. This program prepares graduates for entry-level positions in this exciting field. The need for industrial engineers continues to grow as companies strive to control costs and maintain a competitive edge.

Program Educational Outcomes

The educational objectives of the Industrial Engineering program are to prepare graduates who:

  • Demonstrate competence in engineering practice in local and global industry environments, or in related careers in government or academia.
  • Exhibit effective communication, teamwork, and readiness for leadership while acting ethically and professionally. • Maintain awareness of societal and contemporary issues and fulfill community and society’s needs.
  • Actively engage in lifelong learning, by completing professional development/training courses and workshops, acquiring engineering certification, or pursuing and completing an advanced degree.
Student Outcomes

Graduates will demonstrate:

  1. an ability to apply knowledge of mathematics, science, and engineering.
  2. an ability to design and conduct experiments as well as analyze and interpret data.
  3. an ability to design a system, component, or process to meet desired needs within realistic constraints such as economic, environmental, social, political, ethical, health and safety, manufacturability, and sustainability.
  4. an ability to function on multidisciplinary teams.
  5. an ability to identify, formulate, and solve engineering problems.
  6. an understanding of professional and ethical responsibility.
  7. an ability to communicate effectively.
  8. the broad education necessary to understand the impact of engineering solutions in a global, economic, environmental, and societal context.
  9. a recognition for the need for an ability to engage in lifelong learning.
  10. a knowledge of contemporary issues.
  11. an ability to use the techniques, skills, and modern engineering tools necessary for engineering practice.
  12. an ability to design, develop, implement, and improve integrated systems that include people, materials, information, equipment, and energy.
Accreditation

Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Joshua Steere, Baker College graduate
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[Baker] really helps to develop the critical thinking that's necessary in this field.

Joshua Steere