Continue your professional growth.

Make a difference in people’s lives every day.

Nurses with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) have opportunities to apply their skills and knowledge in a variety of practice areas, including patient care, education, research, and administration. BSNs often specialize in a field that matches their interests—emergency or extended care, pediatrics, obstetrics, or other nursing specialties.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Testimonial quote

I feel that the instructors really work with you; they are really helpful. It’s changed my life.

Shawna Vanderhoef
Nursing Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Baker College School of NursingNursing - Post-Licensure BSNBachelor of Science in Nursing

Continue your professional growth.

Make a difference in people’s lives every day.

Nurses with a Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) have opportunities to apply their skills and knowledge in a variety of practice areas, including patient care, education, research, and administration. BSNs often specialize in a field that matches their interests—emergency or extended care, pediatrics, obstetrics, or other nursing specialties.

Discover Your Future Nursing Career

Career Facts

$65,470

Median salary for Registered Nurses

19%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$96,460

Median salary for Nurse Anesthetists, Nurse Midwives, and Nurse Practitioners

View citations
Overview

Baker's Bachelor of Science in Nursing - Post-Licensure program offers a curriculum created by nurses and employers for licensed Registered Nurses, giving you the opportunity to continue your professional growth by further developing your knowledge, skills, and clinical experiences. In addition to classwork, the curriculum includes three clinical experiences: Community Health Practicum, Leadership Practicum, and Nursing Seminar.

To ensure a quality learning experience, there must be at least 15 students at one location. If there is an insufficient number of students to continue offering courses at a location, you will be required to complete your program at the Online campus.

Contact the Admissions Department to learn about current course offereings and locations.

Participation requires:

  • An unencumbered license as a Registered Nurse (RN) in the United States (US), District of Columbia or US territories; or an unencumbered license as a RN in Canada. Note: Canadian RNs must complete the clinical components of this program under the supervision of a baccalaureate nurse licensed in Canada. Successful completion of the Baker College baccalaureate nursing program does not qualify the Canadian graduate to take the US NCLEX examination.
  • All students are expected to maintain licensure throughout their academic career.
  • Applicants must include a photocopy of active US or Canadian RN license or a printed page from the licensing state's nursing website or Canadian equivalent verifying licensure status and expiration date.
Course Information

Program Conditional Requirements:
US Registered Nurse License
Approved Credit: 73

 

Required Courses15 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HSC 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Applies nutritional biochemistry and physiology content to an analysis of health and illness situations from a holistic perspective. Nutritional, allopathic and alternative healing modalities will be explored and applied through the use of case studies and other varied learning experience.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Nutrition4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
SCI 102C
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5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the structure and function of the various body systems. Laboratory work will include the dissection of mammal organs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 101C.
Anatomy and Physiology II5
SCI 131
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces basic theories about the composition of living cells. Structure and function of various microbes will be explored. The human diseases caused by these microbes in addition to their treatments will be presented.

Concepts in Microbiology2
Nursing Major44 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CIS 371
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the integration of healthcare practice with computer technology and information science. Students will identify, gather, process, and manage information obtained and accessed via advanced information technology. Issues related to the protection of privacy, confidentiality, ethics, and security of information in the healthcare environment will be evaluated.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Introduction to Healthcare Informatics4
NUR 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the registered nurses role transition to a professional baccalaureate nurse with emphasis on leadership, management, and issues influencing nursing education and practice. Students will explore the history of nursing, and how society views the nursing profession including contemporary issues that affect the profession of nursing. Students will integrate prior learning experience and skills with the theory and practice focus of baccalaureate education.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
COL 112.
Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Practice4
NUR 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Builds on the registered nurses knowledge and skills in health assessment. Emphasis is placed on review of body systems, physical examination techniques, and documentation of findings. Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Nursing Assessment for the Registered Nurse4
NUR 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the role of the experienced professional nurse in promoting optimal health, with special emphasis on the rehabilitative populations. Risk factors for illness and injury will be explored and strategies for treatment, health promotion through physical, psychological and spiritual intervention, will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 311, B- or better in NUR 341.
Health Promotion and Vulnerable Populations4
NUR 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores various nursing theorists and provides an overview of evidence-based practice with an emphasis on improved quality of care. Examines the role of research in the application of the nursing process and its contribution to the development of nursing as a science. Students will be challenged to critically evaluate research and how it applies to the nursing profession and explore ethical issues inherent in the research process.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 401, B- or better in NUR 311.
Nursing Theory and Research4
NUR 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the core functions and current organization of community health nursing as part of the larger healthcare system. Concentration is placed on achievement of optimal health outcomes for target populations and selected vulnerable subgroups within the community. The role of nursing will be examined in relation to public policy and emergency response and management.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331.
Community Health Nursing4
NUR 412
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the application of community health and nursing principles in the care of individuals, families, and selected vulnerable subgroups within a variety of community health settings. Nurses serve as advocates, caregivers, leaders and teachers as they apply the nursing process to communities with a focus on epidemiology, environmental health, and emergency response and management.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331, Professional Liability Ins. B- or better in NUR 411.
Community Health Nursing Practicum4
NUR 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes further development of the professional nurse role by exploring contemporary trends in leadership and management of human and financial resources. Focus is on the importance of communication in the development of effective management and leadership skills. Personal leadership styles and values will be identified, and students will enhance leadership competencies by examining self in relation to professional standards, the nursing code of ethics, and leadership theories and models.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331.
Nursing Leadership and Management4
NUR 422
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the development of the role of the professional nurse leader through the application of effective communication, leadership and management theory. Communication skills, various management and leadership theories, economic considerations, scope of practice standards and ethics will be integrated into leadership and management of others in the provision of health care.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331, Professional Liability Ins. B- or better in NUR 421.
Nursing Leadership and Management Practicum4
NUR 482
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4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to synthesize information obtained in this program to explore how the professional nurse can impact healthcare policy as well as how healthcare policy impacts nursing science, practice and education. Students will analyze nursing policy and position statements; political, environmental, and cultural issues; changing nursing roles; and the delivery of quality nursing care in an evolving world. Students will need to identify a preceptor, who holds a minimum of a BSN degree, to assist with the course project.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 412, B- or better in NUR 422, B- or better in NUR 431 or B- or better in NUR 441, Program Director/Dean approval, Professional Liability Ins.
Nursing Seminar4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
NUR 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the main concepts of global health and the link between global health and socio-economic development. This course will focus on measurement of health status, burden of disease, risk factors, and vulnerable populations.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331.
Global Health4
NUR 441
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines alterations in functions affecting individuals across the lifespan. Students will examine pathophysiological concepts utilizing biology, microbiology, and physiological sciences as a basis for nursing practice. The scientific approach will be utilized to increase understanding of the disease process from the cellular to the multi-system level.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in NUR 321, B- or better in NUR 331.
Pathophysiology for the Registered Nurse4
General Education Requirements48 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HUM 353
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2 Quarter Hours

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

Art Appreciation2
HUM 357
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

Music Appreciation2
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Philosophy of Ethics4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
MTH 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to data analysis, data-driven decision making, and various statistical methods including their applications. Methods covered include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, sampling, and regression analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 109 or MTH 112.
Statistical Methods4
PSY 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines changes that occur across the human life span, from conception to old age and death. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Developmental Psychology4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPN 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication. This course focuses on written and oral comprehension, spoken communication, and cultural understanding. Students are encouraged to communicate through a variety of practices with frequently used structures in everyday situations. Grammatical structures addressed include conjugation of regular and irregular verbs; basics of correct pronunciation, agreement and placement of adjectives, nouns, and articles; and the formation of questions. Primary vocabulary areas covered include numbers, colors, classes, greetings, weather, and dates.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis4
ENG 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Language and Culture4
ENG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands students' writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Creative Writing4
ENG 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies theory of behavior in communication in general and in mass media in particular. This course also focuses on the design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communication with an emphasis on the effects that various media have on consumers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Foundations of Mass Communication4
LIT 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies contemporary authors who may be classified as modern or postmodern; figures include principal ethnic and minority writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Contemporary Literature4
LIT 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from colonial times (1600) through the Civil War (1865). American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature I4
LIT 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from Reconstruction (1865) to the present. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature II4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115.
Report Writing4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECN 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on economic topics of international trade theories including advantages, costs, and barriers to free trade; capital mobility; balance of payments; and foreign exchange markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 201.
International Economics4
GEO 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
GEO 102B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and natural environment are studied, along with the historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography II4
HIS 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Women's Studies4
HIS 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations from the period.

World History I4
HIS 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development of emerging nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America with reference to theoretical perspectives such as globalization.

Emerging Nations4
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
ITP 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of American Sign Language (ASL) skills for communicating with Deaf people who sign. Emphasis is on expansion of ASL vocabulary and continued development of expressive and receptive sign skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ITP 111.
American Sign Language II4
POL 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Includes the study of international relations theory, development, and communications as well as American and comparative foreign policy analysis, international law, comparative politics, and peace studies, including conflict resolution and arms control.

International Relations4
SPN 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines major grammatical topics including noun-adjective agreement, reflexive and stem-changing verbs, the present progressive construction, and the past tense. Vocabulary topics include personal care, health, clothing, the home, and travel. Cultural reading is presented to increase comprehension, and class participation is expected.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 101 or 1 year high school Spanish.
Spanish II4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
POL 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the functions of government at the national, state, and local levels. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies on individuals and businesses. The areas of study include the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, courts, the bureaucracy, the economy, congress, the Presidency, and political parties.

American Political Systems4
PSY 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
PSY 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology4
PSY 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality4
PSY 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. This course focuses on the understanding adolescents in our society. The emphasis is on behavior development in establishing skills necessary to work with this group. This includes physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Adolescent Psychology4
PSY 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
SOC 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the values and cultural contexts of global professional settings. Emphasis is on analyzing problems and possible solutions in global interactions.

Global Perspectives4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SCI 215
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 124.
Integrated Physics4
SCI 246
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in MTH 108 or B- or better in MTH 111.
Chemistry I4
SCI 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

Principles of Astronomy4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 180

Program Description

The goal of the Baker College completion baccalaureate nursing program is to provide an opportunity for licensed registered nurses to continue their professional growth through the acquisition of knowledge in skills needed to function as professional nurses in healthcare settings that are responsive to individual and community needs. These individuals will develop into leaders of research, practice, education , and administration within the healthcare environment.

Baker College School of Nursing Overview

The School of Nursing offers a wide range of program options: 

  • A Practical Nurse Certificate program at the Jackson campus
  • A Ladder program at the Auburn Hills campus that provides advancement from a Practical Nurse (PN) curriculum to an Associate Degree (ADN) program
  • Associate Degree in Nursing (ADN) programs at the Allen Park, Flint, and Owosso campuses
  • A Pre-Licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing (BSN) program of study at the Cadillac, Clinton Township, and Muskegon campuses (beginning Fall of 2014) and at the Flint campus (beginning Fall of 2015)
  • A Post-License RN to BSN Baccalaureate program of study at the Owosso campus and through Baker College Online
  • All students completing the Associate Degree in Nursing Program and the Pre-Licensure Bachelor of Science in Nursing Program become eligible to take the National Council Licensure Examination for Registered Nurses (NCLEX-RN).

At the foundation of the nursing program curriculum are eight key program outcomes that permeate all courses within the program.  These outcomes include:  

  • Critical thinking and clinical reasoning
  • Therapeutic Interventions
  • Teamwork and Collaboration 
  • Global and Cultural Awareness 
  • Informatics and Information Literacy 
  • Communication
  • Professional Behaviors 
  • Patient-Centered Care

These concepts are stressed throughout the program and students work toward proficiency in each of these areas.  Within each quarter of study, students participate in theoretical courses, laboratory courses, and clinical practicum courses.  A progression of learning occurs from basic to complex in a wide range of learning environments.  Clinical practicum courses may be found in long term care settings, acute care hospitals, as well as in a variety of community settings.  Students are guided to take what they learn in the classroom, and to apply that learning to actual patient care situations under the supervision of experienced nursing faculty. 

Baker College is proud to provide an educational experience that prepares graduates for a challenging and rewarding career in the profession of nursing.  A caring philosophy is emphasized throughout the nursing program along with a strong technological and academic foundation necessary for meeting the demands of health care environments of today.

Approval / Accreditation

The baccalaureate program at Baker College is accredited by the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education, One Dupont Circle, NW, Suite 530, Washington, DC 20036; phone (202) 887-6791, fax (202) 887-8476; Web address:  www.aacn.nche.edu

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Mission

The mission of the Baker College School of Nursing is to prepare graduates who are life-long learners with the core knowledge and skills needed to provide competent, holistic nursing care in a diverse and ever-changing health care environment.  The curriculum is designed to assist students to become critical thinkers with clinical reasoning skills who also understand the moral, ethical, cultural, and global dimensions of the issues they confront in an ever-evolving health care system. 

As an essential component of Baker College’s academic health programs, the Baccalaureate of Science in Nursing (Post-Licensure) program has the following goals:

  • To develop quality nursing leaders with the ability to advance and promote the health of a diverse population within the communities they serve.
  • To practice as a self-assured, competent professional nurse, who can function in a dynamic health environment.
  • To provide leadership to promote global health.
  • To participate and utilize evidenced based practice in providing high quality nursing care.
  • To graduate nurses committed to professional and personal values and responsibilities.
  • To provide an academic foundation for further nursing education.
Philosophy / Vision

The Baker College School of Nursing embraces a commitment to The Theory of Human Caring, as described by Dr. Jean Watson, in the preparation of individuals for the professional practice of nursing.  “Caring is the moral ideal of nursing whereby the end is protection, enhancement, and preservation of human dignity” (Watson, 1999).  This commitment to caring permeates the entire baccalaureate program of study and is demonstrated by the dedication of faculty to students’ growth through learning. 

Through an approved program of study, faculty serve as role models, and provide student feedback through continuous assessment, thus preparing students with a baccalaureate of science degree in nursing.  Upon graduation students are prepared with a liberal arts education to better meet the needs of clients in a dynamic global community.  The program provides quality education by preparing the nursing student to practice effectively within the healthcare system, to meet the ever-changing demands of the health care community, to provide continuing health care education, and to engage in caring relationships with clients.

The contemporary health care environment highlights continuous quality improvement, patient safety initiatives, and evidence-based care as foundational to the practice of nursing. The Baker College nursing faculty continually examines evolving practice environments to ensure consistency with current healthcare standards. The Baker College baccalaureate degree program utilizes the American Nurses Association Standards of Nursing Practice and Professional Performance, The Quality and Safety Education for Nurses (QSEN) competencies, the Commission on Collegiate Nursing Education (CCNE), and the Michigan Board of Nursing Administrative Rules to derive concepts central to the program curriculum.

This philosophy is congruent with the mission and vision of Baker College to provide quality higher education that enables graduates to be successful throughout challenging and rewarding careers.  Nursing is a career that requires life-long learning in a dynamic health care system, and this program of study provides an academic foundation for further nursing education. The curriculum fosters a learning environment preparing caring nurses committed to professional and personal values and responsibility.

Vision

The vision of the Baker College baccalaureate nursing program is to encourage both pre licensure students and licensed registered nurses the opportunity for professioinal growth by the acquisition of knowledge, and skills needed to function in healthcare settings that are responsive to individual and community needs as professional nurses. These individuals will develop into leaders of research, practice and administration within the health care environment. 

Program Outcomes
  • Synthesize knowledge from a liberal arts education as the basis for decision making in nursing practice.  
  • Apply the nursing process to manage the diverse needs of individuals, families, and communities in diverse environments using a holistic and patient-centered approach.
  • Illustrate the importance of health promotion, disease, and injury prevention to improving populace health.
  • Use and manage information technology to communicate and provide safe and effective patient care.
  • Use evidence-based research to guide nursing practices.
  • Apply theories of leadership and management to provide quality patient care and patient safety.
  • Investigate current issues in health care politics, finance, and regulatory environments to guide nursing practice and client care.
  • Use inter-professional communication and collaboration for improving patient health outcomes.
  • Create an environment that adheres to professional values and behaviors, a professional code of ethics, professional standards, and legal statutes as they relate to the nursing practice.
  • Recognize the importance of lifelong learning and professional career development in the field of nursing.

Big Ideas

  • Cultural and ethnic diversity
  • Safety
  • Technology
  • Ethics
  • Nursing Practices

2011-2012 BSN Outcomes Assessement Plan

Application Information

Prospective Students

An online application is available for Undergraduate and Graduate admission. You may also print the Application for Undergraduate Admission and apply through mail, or at the campus nearest you.

Returning Students

Returning students do not need to re-apply. Please contact the Academic Office on the campus that you plan to attend about returning to Baker College.

Current Students

Allen Park - Nursing (ADN)

  • The Baker College of Allen Park campus has been approved by the Michigan Board of Nursing to admit no more than 30 students per year for the first two years, beginning January 2012.
  • Application Quarter:  Summer for Winter quarter Start
  • Application Dates:  August 12, 2011 deadline 
  • Application Process:  Students are to pick up applications in person in the Academic Office or during Meet and Greet session.  Students must present 2 pieces of identification when picking up and submitting application.  The application packet includes:  1) completed application form; 2) copy of current step plan; and 3) student information sheet.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  Sign up during the Meet and Greet session to be held each summer (dates and time to be determined).  Kaplan test may only be taken once per year.

Auburn Hills - Nursing (LPN to ADN Ladder)

  • Application Quarters:  Spring and Fall Quarters (QTR)
  • Application Dates:  Specific dates are updated for each quarter in the Application Process Guide. This resource and application packets are available in the Health Sciences Office the first week of the application quarter. The Health Sciences Office: Room 209 is located in the Main Academic Building, second floor, east wing.
  • Application Process:  Applications must be picked up in the Health Sciences Office. Students pick up the admission packet and follow the directions for clearance with a Health Science Advisor.  The admission packet includes: 
    • Application, including 2 questions that must be answered;
    • Clearance by a Health Science Advisor or nursing staff; this includes verification of pre-requisite course completion within appropriate time frame and with appropriate grade; 
    • Scheduling of the Kaplan admission test;
  • Submission of completed application to the nursing department by 5:00pm Friday of Week 5.
  • Applications must be turned in to the Health Sciences Office. It is strongly recommended that it be done in person or by a designee. If an application is mailed back, we cannot guarantee its safe arrival to the appropriate area which could jeaopardize your application into your desired quarter.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  After clearance is received from Health Advisor or nursing staff, students schedule a Kaplan test date/time through the Learning Center.  Kaplan test may only be taken every six months.

Cadillac - Nursing Pre-Licensure BSN

  • Cadillac - Nursing Pre-Licensure BSN
  • 24 students are accepted
  • Application Quarters: Summer for Fall  start;  Fall for Spring start
  • Application Dates:
    • Fall Quarter Nursing Start
      • Available Summer quarter Week 1
      • Due Friday Summer quarter Week 5 at close of business
      • Kaplan Entrance exam given in September
    • Winter Quarter Nursing Start
      • Available Fall quarter Week 1
      • Due Friday Fall quarter Week 5 at close of business
      • Kaplan Entrance exam given in December
  • Application Process:  Applications may be picked up in person in the Faculty office.  Applications must be completed and returned in person to the Faculty office by the designated deadline.  At this time, applicants sign up for the Kaplan Admission Assessment test.
  • Student must have all pre-requisite courses completed the quarter completing the application.  For example, if applying in the Summer for a Fall start, pre-requisites must be completed Summer quarter.  Students applying in the Fall for a Winter start must have completed pre-requisites Fall quarter.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  Sign up for the Kaplan test when application is turned in.  The Kaplan test will be given on designated dates in December for Fall applicants (Winter start) and in September for Summer applicants (Fall start).  Students with incomplete applications will not be allowed to sit for the Kaplan Test.  Must obtain a 66% or greater on the Kaplan test for your application to be complete.
  • Application Informational Meetings: Meetings are held quarterly. Specific location, dates and times are posted on campus and in the "Beacon" (Cadillac Campus Newsletter). Additionally, meeting information is available in the faculty office (231-876-3158).

Clinton Township - Nursing Pre-Licensure

  • 40 students are admitted each Fall and 40 students are admitted each Spring
  • Application Quarters:  Spring quarter for a Fall start; and Fall quarter for a Spring start.
  • Application Dates:  Applications accepted in the first five weeks of the Spring Quarter for Fall start and in the first five weeks of the Fall quarter for the Spring start.
  • Application Process:  Students must pick up application packets and return in person to the Nursing office.  Photo ID must be presented.   Applications must include the  1)Information page;  2) Current copy of Step Plan; and 3) Statement page verifying that they have completed all pre-requisite courses with a grade of B- or better.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  Open enrollment in October to test on designated dates in November.  Open enrollment in April to test on designated dates in May.  Kaplan test may only be taken once per year.

Flint - Nursing (ADN)

  • 40 students are accepted during each application cycle (80 students per year)
  • Application Quarters:  Spring quarter for a Fall start; Fall quarter for a Spring start
  • Application Dates:  Applications accepted during the month of April for Fall Quarter and during the month of October for Spring Quarter
  • Application Process: Applications will be available in the Health Science Office for pick-up and must be returned to the Health Science Office by the deadline date and time listed in the packet.
  • Students are to complete the application and the “Alternative Careers” web site card to be eligible.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  Instructions are enclosed in the application packet on when students must call to schedule their Kaplan test.  The test is not given until after the quarter ends.  Students who have not met all requirements for admission will not be permitted to sit for the test.
  • Kaplan test may only be taken once per year.    

Muskegon - Nursing Pre-Licensure BSN

  • 16 students accepted for Fall; 16 accepted for Spring
  • Application Quarters:  Summer quarter for a Fall start  and Winter quarter for a Spring start
  • Application Dates:  Applications accepted during the month of August for Fall Quarter and during the month of March  for the Spring Quarter
  • Application Process:  Students pick up applications in the G-Wing reception area.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test:  Students sign up for the Kaplan test when picking up the application with the administrative assistant. .  Kaplan test may only be taken once per year.

Owosso - Nursing (ADN) and Post-Licensure BSN

  • 35-40 students are admitted for Fall quarter and 35-40 students are admitted for Spring quarter.
  • Application Quarters: Spring quarter for a Fall start; and Fall quarter for a Spring start.
  • Application Dates:  Applications accepted during the month of April for Fall Quarter and during the month of October for Spring Quarter.
  • Application Process:  Students must pick up and return applications in person in the Health Science Office.  Student ID must be presented.  Applications include:  1) Application page; 2) Essay on assigned topic as designated in the application packet.
  • Kaplan Admission Assessment Test: Students sign up for designated test dates when completed applications are submitted.  Kaplan testing occurs in the week following the end of the application quarter (June and December).  Kaplan test may only be taken once per year.

Limited Enrollment

Full acceptance into the professional track of some programs is limited due to clinical site availability. Students compete to earn acceptance into these programs. Selection criteria have been developed to choose the most qualified students for limited enrollment programs.  Students who have successfully completed the conditional acceptance requirements for their program are eligible to apply for full acceptance in to the professional track of the program. Refer to the program information supplement for program specific details on the application process, the criteria used, and the courses used in the GPA calculations.

Once selected through the limited enrollment criteria, for full acceptance into a program, students must complete program requirements including, but not limited to: program specific orientations, background checks, drug screens, etc. Please contact your campus official for additional information.

Campus Contacts

Allen Park (ADN)

Shannon Meijer, MSN, RN
Interim Nursing Director.
Office: (989) 729-3475
shannon.meijer@baker.edu

Auburn Hills (LPN to ADN Ladder)

Roberta Cook RN, MSN, CPNP 
Director of Nursing
Office: (248) 276-6661
roberta.cook@baker.edu

Cadillac (Pre-Licensure BSN)

Lori Dewey MSN, RN
Director of Nursing
Office: (231) 876-3163
lori.dewey@baker.edu

Clinton Township (Pre-Licensure BSN)

Karen Grobson MSN, RN, CNE
Director of Nursing
Office: (586) 790-9164
karen.grobson@baker.edu

Flint (ADN)

Georgia Wilson MSN, RN 
Director of Nursing
Office: (810) 766-4359
georgia.wilson@baker.edu

Muskegon (Pre-Licensure)

Jennifer Kaiser MSN, RN 
Director of Nursing
Office: (231) 777-5378
jennifer.kaiser@baker.edu

Owosso (ADN and Post-Licensure)

Shannon Meijer MSN, RN
Director of Nursing
Office: (989) 729-3475
shannon.meijer@baker.edu

Baker Online (Post Licensure BSN)

Lesley Morgan PhD, MBA, ARNP 
Director, Baccalaureate Nursing Program
Admissions Office: (810) 766-4390
Toll Free: (800) 469-4062
lesley.morgan@baker.edu

Advisory Board

Phyllis Bergquest
Durand Senior Care and Rehabilitation Center

Dawn Blackwell
Memorial Healthcare Center

Shelly Brandt
Shiawassee County RESD

Donna Bullen
Durand Senior Care and Rehabilitation Center

Sally Chapko
Hazel Findley Country Manor

Tina Coffman
Memorial Healthcare Center

Glenda Cross
Ingham Regional Medical Center

Becky Dahlke
Memorial Healthcare Center

Melissa Dinkins
Ovid Healthcare Center

Tina Gross
Sparrow Specialty Hospital

Jennifer Hanna
Ingham Regional Medical Center

Janice Hodges, RN
Sparrow Health System

Helen Howard
Respite Volunteers Shiawassee

Amy Huff
Hazel Findlay Country Manor

Chris Jodoin
Sparrow Health System

Carol Jones
Ingham Regional Medical Center

Jennifer Jones
Shiawassee Country RESD

Amanda Lampron
McLaren Greater Lansing

Cathy Stevenson
Memorial Healthcare Center

Robert Trout
Sparrow Specialty Hospital

Karen West
Shiawassee County RESD

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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