Expand your professional opportunities.

Prepare to help people gain strength and independence.

Rehabilitation studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to helping people who are injured, ill, or impaired improve their ability to function and live more independently. Professional therapist assistants, trained in rehabilitation studies, evaluate patients on a holistic level, and then work with both occupational therapists and physical therapists to develop treatment plans that provide the most benefit for patients.

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New Career

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I can honestly tell you that I would much rather have a Baker graduate….they have exceeded my expectations.

Amy Ensign
Major Southeast Michigan Hospital
Rehabilitation Studies Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Rehabilitation StudiesBachelor of Rehabilitation Studies

Expand your professional opportunities.

Prepare to help people gain strength and independence.

Rehabilitation studies takes an interdisciplinary approach to helping people who are injured, ill, or impaired improve their ability to function and live more independently. Professional therapist assistants, trained in rehabilitation studies, evaluate patients on a holistic level, and then work with both occupational therapists and physical therapists to develop treatment plans that provide the most benefit for patients.

Discover Your Future Rehabilitation Career

Career Facts

$39,430

Median salary for Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides

41%

Estimated employment increase by 2022 for Physical Therapist Assistants and Aides

$75,400

Median salary for Occupational Therapists

View citations
Overview

The Rehabilitation Studies bachelor degree program at Baker College teaches you an interdisciplinary team approach to rehabilitation that blends two disciplines: occupational therapy assistant and physical therapy assistant. Our curriculum, taught by practicing clinicians, merges extensive health science course work with the hands-on training and clinical experience you need to become a highly valued assistant. 

When you graduate, you’ll be ready to help develop and carry out plans that combine appropriate treatments and procedures that speed recovery and provide maximum patient benefit. 

The Occupational Therapy Assistant (OTA) and Physical Therapist Assistant (PTA) associate degree programs must be pursued separately. They cannot be taken simultaneously. You must meet all entrance requirements for each clinical program (OTA and PTA). Evaluations of transfer students and practicing clinicians will be done on an individual basis. Additional science course work incorporated throughout the program may allow you to prepare for graduate studies in a related field.

Course Information
Rehabilitation Studies Major Requirements155 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HSC 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

Introduction to Healthcare4
HSC 112
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1 Quarter Hours

Introduces medical documentation for rehabilitation professionals. Offered early in the OTA and PTA programs.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Clinical Documentation1
HSC 211
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2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on human development in the gross, fine, cognitive, and psychological domains from birth to death. Emphasis is placed on gross motor and psychological development.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HSC 281.
Lifespan Development2
HSC 281
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2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems as it relates to normal motor control and sensory integration. The neurological foundations of therapeutic exercise principles are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program.
Neurological Foundations of Motor Control2
HSC 285
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3 Quarter Hours

Focuses on an advanced investigation of specific orthopedic, neurological, rheumatological, and medical conditions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in SCI 211, acceptance in the BRS, OTA, or PTA program.
Clinical Pathology3
HSC 312
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses legal issues, restraints, and problems arising from organization and delivery of healthcare services. Topics to be included are: tort law; hospital, physician, nurse, and other health professional's liability; informed consent; medical records; legal reporting obligations; abortion; autopsy, donation and experimentation; sterilization and artificial insemination; euthanasia; patient rights and responsibilities; labor relation; insurance; trial procedures; and restraint of trade are topics which are included.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 111, Junior status.
Health Law and Regulations4
HSC 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the basic principles of healthcare administration including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The emphasis will be on administration of hospitals, organizational structure, trustee responsibility, medical staff relationships, third-party payors, and fiscal management.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 111, Junior status.
Healthcare Administration4
HSC 402A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
Junior status.
Ethics for Health Professionals4
HSC 403
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines basic accounting principles and finance in healthcare settings. Considerations in budgetary preparation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 401, HSC 312.
Health System Finance4
MED 103
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology4
OTA 111
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the foundations, history, philosophy, and development of occupational therapy. The scope of occupational therapy practice and organizations will be defined. Delineation between the roles and functions of the registered occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant will be emphasized. Initial observation experiences in at least two different occupational therapy settings are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in HSC 111.
Introduction to Occupational Therapy Assisting2
OTA 120
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3 Quarter Hours

Introduces OTA students to therapeutic activity and various forms of media utilized in occupational therapy treatment settings. Students develop and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to identify, analyze, and adapt purposeful activities in the areas of self-care, work, and leisure. Extensive activity analysis and application to various patient care areas are emphasized. Students will become familiar with group interaction and group processes. Recreational and music/movement groups are also explored. 20 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program.
Elements of Therapeutic Media3
OTA 141A
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3 Quarter Hours

Focuses on fundamental practice issues in occupational therapy, including standards of practice, COTA supervision, the therapeutic intervention process, medical documentation, team interaction, and management of therapy service. Professional ethics, legal aspects, insurance reimbursement, and quality assurance are introduced. 20 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program.
Fundamentals of Occupational Therapy Assistant Practice3
OTA 171
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides clinical observation of client services in the area of mental health. Observation skills, group interaction, and documentation are emphasized and integrated into the occupational therapy process with concurrent OTA coursework. 40 hours of clinical are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program , Student background check or Fingerprinting.
Corequisite(s):
HSC 211, OTA 211B
Level I Fieldwork1
OTA 172
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1 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 211B.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 221A
Level I Fieldwork1
OTA 201A
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2 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 211B
OTA Clinical Techniques I2
OTA 202A
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2 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 201B.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 221A
OTA Clinical Techniques II2
OTA 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces OTA students to the role of occupational therapy in the mental health setting and discusses mental disorders commonly seen in occupational therapy. Provides the foundation for instruction in the therapeutic use of activities and treatment from acute to chronic care. The scope of the lecture primarily deals with adolescence through adult; however, a section on childhood psychiatric disorders will be included. Laboratory content encompasses the role of group dynamics and process applications in mental health occupational therapy intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or OTA program.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 201B
OTA Principles and Applications I4
OTA 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the role of occupational therapy in the evaluation, assessment, and treatment intervention for physical dysfunction. The scope of the course ranges from acute care through long-term rehabilitation, with a primary emphasis from adolescence through adulthood. Therapeutic skills and techniques for program planning and implementation are heavily incorporated into the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 211B.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 202B
OTA Principles and Applications II4
OTA 231B
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3 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HSC 211.
OTA Principles and Applications III3
OTA 251
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores the role of occupational therapy and introduces the occupational therapy assistant to the specialty areas of orthopedics, industrial rehabilitation, pain management, and aquatics. Observation and beginning level skills, strategies, applications, and goal planning will be emphasized. 15 hours of lecture and 10 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HSC 211.
OT in Specialty Areas2
OTA 252
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3 Quarter Hours

Explores the psychosocial and physical aspects of aging and the role of occupational therapy with the older adult. Treatment planning, application, and preventative strategies are explored in the performance areas of activities of daily living, leisure, and work.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in HSC 211.
Geriatric Patient Care3
OTA 261
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides OTA students with the preparation for the Level II Fieldwork experience. The areas reviewed are: ethical and professional behavior, liability, communication skills, reinforcement of academic knowledge, and treatment selection/application. This course provides OTA students with case study applications, in-servicing, and clinical preparation. Bloodborne pathogen training is required as part of the course content.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 171A.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 172A.
OTA Professional Preparation1
OTA 262
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides a seminar-style format for this course offered between Level II Fieldwork experiences. Students will present a comprehensive case study at the completion of this course allowing further integration of Level II clinical education.

Corequisite(s):
OTA 271B, OTA 272B.
OTA Fieldwork Integration1
OTA 271A
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6 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 261.
Corequisite(s):
OTA 262, OTA 272B
OTA Fieldwork II A6
OTA 272A
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6 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Corequisite(s):
OTA 262, OTA 271B
OTA Fieldwork II B6
OTA 291
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides the OTA student with a comprehensive review in preparation for the National Board Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) examination. This review will include all domain areas of the examination. Students will be required to satisfactorily complete a mock certification examination. This is a capstone course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OTA 221A.
OTA Board Review1
PSY 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Abnormal Psychology4
PTA 111
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces physical therapist assistant students to the foundations and principles of the profession and the American Physical Therapy Association. Basic theories and practices of physical therapy are emphasized, with a detailed analysis of the boundaries between the physical therapist and the assistant. Ethical standards in practice and legislation governing the utilization of the PTA are also covered in detail. Scientific research design, psychological reactions to disability, and other issues relating to the profession and patient care are also discussed.

Introduction to PTA2
PTA 171
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides a part-time, unpaid, practical, work experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Clinical experience time is integrated with ongoing academic coursework to facilitate the transition from classroom to clinic. Clinical competencies, as expected of a developing clinician, will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. Students will complete assignments per clinical instructor availability and clinical site hours. 60 clinical hours are required.

Level I Fieldwork1
PTA 172
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides a part-time, unpaid, practical, work experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Clinical experience time is integrated with ongoing academic coursework to facilitate the transition from classroom to clinic. Clinical competencies, as expected of a developing clinician, will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. Students will complete assignments per clinical instructor availability and clinical site hours. 60 clinical hours are required.

Level I Fieldwork1
PTA 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Begins the student's experience with patient care. Patient preparation and monitoring of vital signs are reviewed. Assessment techniques of goniometry and muscle screening and treatment techniques of massage are learned in lecture and laboratory experiences. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or PTA program.
PTA Techniques I4
PTA 212
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4 Quarter Hours

Includes theory, principles of application, and development of technical skills with a variety of physical therapy treatments. Traction, superficial thermal agents, circulatory assistive devices, and electrotherapy agents are presented with basic competencies evaluated in laboratory experiences. Functional anatomy and basic patient handling skills are emphasized. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in PTA 211.
PTA Techniques II4
PTA 221A
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers kinesiological principles as applied to the human body. Exercise physiology in rehabilitation, tissue regeneration, and basic isotonic, isometric, and isokinetic exercise are learned. Students will also be instructed in methodology of basic fitness testing and basic terminology and techniques of extremity manual therapy. Joint assessment and a problem-solving approach to therapeutic exercise prescription are utilized. Joints of the extremities and the truck are systematically reviewed by analyzing pathological conditions and orthopedic management. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.

Therapeutic Exercise I4
PTA 222B
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5 Quarter Hours

Introduces advanced exercise and rehabilitation techniques using the clinical problem-solving approach to patient care. All professional level coursework is integrated into this course with the introduction of clinical neuroanatomy, developmental sequencing, and a variety of neurological approaches. Common neurological pathologies and their clinical manifestations are discussed. Laboratory participation and the case study approach to patient care decision making is emphasized. 20 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in PTA 221B.
Therapeutic Exercise II5
PTA 231B
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4 Quarter Hours

Describes the levels of independence along the mobility spectrum addressing safety, positioning, and guarding techniques for each level. Bed mobility, wheelchair utilization, assistive device training, and transfers, using proper body mechanics are learned. Normal gait patterns are studied and deviations are reviewed. Basic orthotics and prosthetics are presented. The primary objective of this course is to familiarize students with methods to optimize patient mobility. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or PTA program.
Functional Mobility4
PTA 241C
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3 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth study to analyze the unique physical therapy challenges of the geriatric and acute care patient populations. Topics covered in detail include burn and open wound management, cardiac rehabilitation, multiple trauma, circulatory assistive devices, postsurgical management, and orthopedic and neurological conditions common to the elderly.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in PTA 211.
Acute and Long-Term Care3
PTA 258
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3 Quarter Hours

Presents a focused study of the special rehabilitation needs of patient groups including athletes, adults with neurological disorders, children, and industrial workers. Topics covered include patient education, injury prevention, special rehabilitation techniques, and other specific information for each group. A variety of areas may be covered including: aquatic exercise programs, sports medicine for the athlete, industrial rehabilitation, treatment and positioning of the pediatric patient, adult neurological rehabilitation, and other current topics in physical therapy. Assessment and treatment of common diagnoses in these groups are addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in PTA 211.
Special Topics in Physical Therapy3
PTA 261B
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1 Quarter Hours

Focuses on professionalism, the role of the interdisciplinary health care team, effective communication skills, and patient interviewing techniques. Also described in detail are the critical nature of self-assessment, recognition of stressors, and utilization of appropriate coping mechanisms. This course will also orient students to the part-time clinical experience process.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BRS or PTA program.
Professional Preparation I1
PTA 262
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1 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Clinical Integration1
PTA 263
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1 Quarter Hours

Presents an overview of the organizational structure in a physical therapy department and orientation to management/supervisory styles. Also described in detail are operational issues impacting the PTA in today's healthcare arena, including documentation guidelines, billing and insurance issues, and total quality improvement. This course will also orient students to the full-time clinical affiliation process.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in PTA 261B.
Professional Preparation II1
PTA 271C
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides a six-week, unpaid, practical, learning experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. In-services may be required by the clinical site. Clinical competencies will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. Students are expected to complete 240 hours.

PTA Level II Fieldwork6
PTA 272C
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6 Quarter Hours

Provides a six-week, unpaid, practical, work experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. In-services may be required by the clinical site. Clinical competencies will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. A greater emphasis on independence, professional confidence, and competent decision making will be expected in this final clinical experience. Students are expected to complete 240 hours.

PTA Level II Fieldwork6
RHS 471
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4 Quarter Hours

Culminates the completion of the Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies coursework in this first of two capstone courses. Students will conduct professional literature reviews and examine evidence-based practice research pertaining to the occupational and physical therapy professions. Areas of study include: neurological rehabilitation, orthopedics, wellness and health promotion, and geriatrics. A professional portfolio containing evidence-based clinical research, literature reviews, clinical observations/discussions, and professional presentations is required.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Evidence-Based Practice and Clinical Research I4
RHS 472
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4 Quarter Hours

Culminates the completion of the Bachelor of Rehabilitation Studies program in this final capstone course. Students will conduct professional literature reviews and examine evidence-based practice research pertaining to the occupational and physical therapy professions. Areas of study include: acute care and rehabilitation, pediatrics, mental health, and special topics. A professional portfolio containing evidence-based clinical research, literature reviews, clinical observations/discussions, and professional presentations is required.

Prerequisite(s):
RHS 471, Program Director/Dean approval.
Evidence-Based Practice and Clinical Research II4
SCI 101C
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5 Quarter Hours

Deals with the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Anatomy and Physiology I5
SCI 102C
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5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the structure and function of the various body systems. Laboratory work will include the dissection of mammal organs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 101C.
Anatomy and Physiology II5
SCI 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Pathophysiology4
SCI 271A
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5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes advanced human anatomy and physiology as well as the study of movement biomechanics and basic physics principles. Angiology, arthrology, osteology, and myology are explored by anatomical region. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Clinical Kinesiology5
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
General Education Requirements60 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 121A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective4
ELECT 161A
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161B
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ELECT 161C
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
Western Geography4
HIS 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Women's Studies4
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Presentational Speaking4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 215

Program Description


This program addresses the unique needs of today's physical therapist assistant or occupational therapy assistant in a managed care environment. The interdisciplinary "team" approach as well as a functional approach to rehabilitation is strongly emphasized in the program philosophy, without compromising the integrity of either field. This degree requires students to complete both the Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assistant associate degree programs, as well as extensive health science coursework pertinent to clinical practice at the assistant level. The Occupational Therapy Assistant and Physical Therapist Assistant associate degree programs must be pursued separately. They cannot be taken simultaneously. Students must meet all entrance requirements for each clinical program (OTA and PTA). Additional science coursework incorporated throughout the program may allow students to prepare for graduate studies in a related field. Transfer students and practicing clinicians will be evaluated on an individual basis. Program Status: Open Enrollment

Accreditation

The Physical Therapist Assistant Programs at Allen Park, Flint, and Muskegon are accredited by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (CAPTE), 1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; Web address: www.capteonline.org; e-mail: accreditation@apta.org. Program graduates will have met the academic requirements needed to apply for the NPTAE licensure exam.

Effective July 31, 2013, Baker College of Auburn Hills has been granted Candidate for Accreditation status by the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education (1111 North Fairfax Street, Alexandria, VA 22314; phone: 703-706-3245; email: accreditation@apta.org). Candidate for Accreditation is a pre-accreditation status of affiliation with the Commission on Accreditation in Physical Therapy Education that indicates that the program may matriculate students in technical courses and that the program is progressing toward accreditation. Candidate for Accreditation is not an accreditation status nor does it assure eventual accreditation.
For information about the Licensure Exam see: www.fsbpt.org/ExamCandidates

The Occupational Therapy Assistant Programs at Allen Park and Muskegon are fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and can be reached by mail at: c/o Accreditation Department, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449; phone: (301) 652-2682; www.acoteonline.org.

Graduates from the accredited programs, at either location, will be able to sit for the national certification examination for occupational therapy assistant administered by the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT). A felony conviction or certain misdemeanors may affect a graduate's ability to sit for the NBCOT Certification examination or attain state license. For further information on these limitations, contact NBCOT. After successful completion of this exam, the individual will be a Certified Occupational Therapy Assistant (COTA) and may apply for licensure in the state of Michigan.

Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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I can honestly tell you that I would much rather have a Baker graduate….they have exceeded my expectations.

Amy Ensign
Major Southeast Michigan Hospital