Below is the list of Technical Elective courses to choose from within each Engineering/Technology elective discipline.  Hover over the course name and number for detailed course description.

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Sonya Randle, Baker Graduate
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

My choice was Baker College. Because I saw how they really took care of their graduates.

Sonya Randle

Technical Electives

Below is the list of Technical Elective courses to choose from within each Engineering/Technology elective discipline.  Hover over the course name and number for detailed course description.

Course Information
Automotive Services Technology Electives
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ABT 151
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5 Quarter Hours

Covers the safety precautions in welding and cutting. Besides MIG welding, TIG, oxyacetylene, resistance spot welding, and plasma cutting are included. Students learn the processes used in body repair. 15 hours of lecture and 70 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Autobody Technician.

Corequisite(s):
ABT 106.
MIG Welding5
AST 102
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6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on an introduction to engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Computerized engine controls are reviewed as are ignition systems, fuel/air systems, and exhaust systems. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Performance I6
AST 103
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6 Quarter Hours

Continues the examination of engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Emission controls, effects of ignition timing, analysis of exhaust gases, and advanced engine services are studied. 20 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 102.
Engine Performance II6
AST 122
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues coverage of engine failure analysis with a focus on diagnostic procedures. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of labs are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 121.
Engine Repair II4
AST 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents an overview of basic Hybrid theory and applications within an automobile. Topics covered but not limited to, introduction to Hybrid vehicles, Hybrid safety, Hybrid battery design and application, battery operated electric vehicles, mild and assist Hybrid technologies, full Hybrid applications and alternative fuel overview. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B. AST 113.
Introduction to Hybrid Vehicles4
AST 221A
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6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the design and operation of automotive brake systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair, to manufacturer specifications, of traditional and Anti Lock Brake Systems (ABS) as well as Traction Control Systems (TCS). Lab demonstrations and on-car repair provide a working knowledge of hydraulic systems, disc/drum machining, rebuilding, and power assist, as well as scan tool usage to repair ABS/TCS systems. 20 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Corequisite(s):
AST 106, AST 111A.
Automotive Brake Service6
AST 231A
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6 Quarter Hours

Examines front and rear drive vehicles and the suspension and drive system for each. Steering mechanisms and suspension components for both automatic and manual drives are discussed as are alignment techniques. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Corequisite(s):
AST 106.
Automotive Suspension/Steering6
AST 241A
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6 Quarter Hours

Covers automotive heating and air conditioning system theories, troubleshooting, and servicing. Proper refrigerant recovery, recycling, storage, and use of recharging equipment will also be covered. Students will be made aware of recent environmental concerns relevant to coolant and refrigeration. In addition, basic shop safety and safe use of recycling equipment will be discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A.
Heating/Air Conditioning6
AST 251
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8 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the front-wheel drive transaxle and components. Transaxle fundamentals and operation will be reviewed as well as common faults and servicing procedures. 40 hours of lecture and 85 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 106, C or better in AST 111A, C or better in AST 101 or C or better in AST 121.
Automatic Transmission and Transaxle8
AST 261
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6 Quarter Hours

Investigates the manual drive train and major components. Transmissions, drive shafts, differentials, and drive axles are examined. Diagnosis and troubleshooting are discussed. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Automotive Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in AST 112B, C or better in AST 101 or C or better in AST 121.
Manual Drive Train and Axles6
DSL 151
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the theory and application of cutting and welding for heavy duty repair. Topics include gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, plasma arc cutting, and flame cutting techniques. 10 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Welding for Heavy Duty Repair4
Civil Engineering Technical Electives
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CE 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers design of concrete and steel bridges in accordance with the latest AASHTO specifications; understanding of theoretical background behind the codes such as risk and reliability concepts; load rating of bridges, and hands-on bridge design using computer software and hand calculations.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Design of Bridges4
CE 325
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4 Quarter Hours

Describes principles of design and practice for rural and urban highway facilities and airport installations; design criteria and controls, capacity analysis, cross-section selection, design of horizontal and vertical alignment, intersections, interchanges and computer applications to design problems.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Geometric Design of Highways and Airports4
CE 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the analysis and design of pre-stressed concrete structural elements; full and partial pre-stressing; service ability and strength requirements; code criteria for bridges, buildings, and other structures.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Pre-Stressed Concrete Design4
CE 355
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4 Quarter Hours

Discusses basic principles of mechanics, elasticity, and failure as applied to wood; design methods and specifications governing the design of sawn lumber, plywood, and glulam timber structures and structural components.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Structural Timber Design4
CE 358
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers flexible and rigid pavement design procedures; subgrade, base, and surfacing characteristics; loads; stresses in pavement systems; material characterization; pavement response models; pavement performance models; structural design systems; effects of natural, forces; and construction practices. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Pavement Design4
CE 371
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents fundamentals of geotechnics applied to design and analysis of shallow foundations, excavations, retaining structures, and slopes; selected topics on soil improvement and vibration; emphasis on computer utilization.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Geotechnical Engineering4
CE 385
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers history, economics, and traffic characteristics of transportation systems; planning, design, construction, maintenance, and operation of air, highway, pipeline, rail, and water transportation facilities-vehicles, guide-ways, and terminals.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 312.
Transportation Engineering4
CE 415
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4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water movement from arrival on land surface until it reaches the sea overland; concept of frequency, maximum probable runoff of rainfall, mass curves, and other statistical methods of hydrologic engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341.
Hydrology4
CE 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents steady and unsteady flow in pipelines and pipe networks; analysis of fluid flow in open channel systems; design of pipelines, drainage facilities, and water supply networks.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 341.
Hydraulics4
CE 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Discusses water quality criteria, water treatment processes: physical, chemical, and biological treatment processes, sludge processing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361.
Water Treatment Principles4
CE 435
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents water processing and distribution, wastewater collection systems - management, operation and maintenance, advanced wastewater treatment processes, water reuse, design of sanitary sewers.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361.
Wastewater Collection Systems4
CE 438
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4 Quarter Hours

Discusses environmental laws and regulations; solid waste sources, composition and characteristics; properties of municipal solid waste, processing technologies, storage, transportation and disposal, management of landfills, materials recovery and recycling.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 361.
Solid Waste Principles4
EGR 395
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the dean.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 341A, ME 351, Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Research4
Diesel Service Technology Electives
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
AG 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the maintenance of gas and diesel engines, field machinery, tractor and power units, and shop equipment to include the fundamentals of gas and arc welding. Students will be exposed to the common implements and equipment used in the agriculture industry. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113, MTH 108.
Agriculture Equipment and Tooling4
DSL 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides instruction for practice and safe operation of commercial vehicles for Diesel Service students. This course is designed for diesel service technicians who operate commercial vehicles for the purpose of service and diagnosis. Instruction will include pre-trip inspections, range driving, and on-road driving. A majority of class time is spent behind the wheel, however, some lab/classroom time is involved. Students will earn a minimum of 30 hours of driving time in both range and on-road settings.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 181, professional Driving Waiver, current TIP issued by Michigan, USDOT medical exam/drug screen.
CDL Preparation for Diesel Service Technician4
DSL 241
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6 Quarter Hours

Combines heating and cooling of the truck cab (driver comfort), product refrigeration for freight industry, and passenger comfort for the bussing industry. Students learn to diagnose and repair vehicles and commercial heating/refrigeration systems. Topics include lubricants, compressor types, electrical and mechanical controls, refrigerant types and characteristics, as well as leak testing and repair. Includes lecture and hands-on experiences to assist in preparation for the State License exam for Automotive Heating/Air Conditioning as well as EPA 609 and EPA 608 certifications. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Heavy Duty Heating/Air Conditioning6
DSL 251
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on ADA and other systems used in the bussing industry. Topics and equipment covered include, but are not limited to, bus doors, ADA lifts, audio/video systems, passenger lighting, and comfort controls. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Auxiliary Systems4
DSL 261
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6 Quarter Hours

Focuses on manual transmission drive trains. Diagnosis, service and repair of manual transmissions, transfer boxes, clutches, and single and dual rear drive axles will be covered. 20 hours of lecture and 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 141.
Heavy Duty Drive Trains6
DSL 285
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides extensive safety training while addressing the installation, maintenance, and servicing of various types of power generation sets. Topics include a basic introduction to generators/alternators, voltage regulation, governors, engine/generator instrumentation and controls, generator protection, automatic transfer switches, sizing and servicing generator systems, and electronic switching components necessary in the generation and/or transmission of electric power. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in DSL 142, C or better in DSL 271.
Power Generation4
DSL 291
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5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on maintenance, inspection, and repair of heavy equipment hydraulic systems. Topics and equipment include pumps, filtration, hoses and fittings, control valves, and actuators. 20 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
AST 112B or DSL 141, MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Hydraulics5
Electrical Engineering Technical Electives
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
CIS 310
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111.
Visual BASIC4
CIS 404
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of processor function and system design. Students will evaluate the performance of a given microprocessor using common benchmarks, analyze instruction sets in HLL, RISC, and CISC architectures, and expand their understanding of binary operations and related impact on ALU design. Students will research and compare performance and design factors in parallel, pipelined, and multiprocessor designs; analyze branch prediction impact on program design; and evaluate the effectiveness of hierarchical memory designs. Throughout this course students will engage in periodic research on various topics and will also complete an independent, comprehensive, in-depth analysis of an instructor-approved topic in high performance computer architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 340, CIS 303A or EET 226A.
Advanced Computer Architecture4
EGR 395
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the dean.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 341A, ME 351, Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Research4
ME 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers classical thermodynamics. This course includes the properties of a pure substance; work, heat, energy, enthalpy, and entropy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; and power and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 143, SCI 253.
Thermodynamics4
ME 381
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces mechatronics, the integration of mechanical design, electronics, control systems, and computer science to create better products, systems, and processes. Topics include mechanisms, sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, dynamic system modeling, automation, robotics, and other applications. Experimental practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 311, ME 361.
Mechatronics4
Mechanical Engineering Technical Electives
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
EGR 395
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the dean.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 341A, ME 351, Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Research4
ME 305
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to finite element theory, problem formulation, and computer analysis. The concepts covered are isoparametric formulation, element stiffness and load matrices, global stiffness matrix, governing equations, boundary conditions, temperature effects, pre- and post-processing, scalar field, deformation and stress analysis, commercial FEA software, and application in 1-D-, 2-D, and 3-D-models.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 211, MTH 261.
Introduction to FEA4
ME 306
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the development of the finite element method including a deep dive into applications. Element types and modeling techniques will be explored, followed by analysis types and convergence. Modeling assumptions will be discussed in terms of their effect on solution development and accuracy.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 211, ME 305, MTH 261.
Intermediate FEA4
ME 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to bioengineering related topics such as biomechanics, and biomaterials used in medical applications. Students will use the principles of kinematics and dynamics to analyze and interpret a variety of human body movements. Includes a survey of biomaterials including properties and specific medical applications.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 215 or SCI 251.
Biomechanics and Biomaterials4
ME 342
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of fluid mechanics. This course includes the differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, surface resistance, flow in conduits, flow measurement, turbomachinery, and an introduction to computational fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 341A.
Fluid Mechanics II4
ME 350
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the natural laws of work. This topic deals with the minimization of the hazards and maximization of the efficiency of the work system in which the human is a part. The scope of this system can be as simple as a carpenter and a hammer or as complicated as the control system of a nuclear power plant.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 105, ME 201.
Ergonomics for Engineers4
ME 381
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces mechatronics, the integration of mechanical design, electronics, control systems, and computer science to create better products, systems, and processes. Topics include mechanisms, sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, dynamic system modeling, automation, robotics, and other applications. Experimental practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 311, ME 361.
Mechatronics4
ME 425
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the physics of noise, vibration, and harshness and the relationship between the three, as well as, their implications. This course will also cover development in vehicle and component noise and vibration control, analysis, subjective evaluation acoustic material, and measurement as applied to mobility industry.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 421.
Noise, Vibration, and Harshness4
ME 495
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics4
ME 495A
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering. Students will practice Computer Aided Engineering using the Solidworks software package.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics: CAE with Solidworks4
ME 495B
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers selected topics in engineering. Students explore the status of various alternative energy strategies and their related engineering ramifications.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Engineering Topics: Alternative Energies4

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • Load More FAQ'S
Sonya Randle, Baker Graduate
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

My choice was Baker College. Because I saw how they really took care of their graduates.

Sonya Randle