Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
120 Hours

Major

36 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ACC 2410
Individual Taxation
3

Provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of federal and state taxation related to individuals. Students will examine the federal tax system; research and apply tax law; and calculate gross income, deductions, and future tax liability. Tax planning for the individual will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010

FIN 3150
Risk Management
3

Examines the all-encompassing nature of pure risk on the individual, business, and society; illustrating ways in which risk management plans can be implemented. Exposure to this content enables students to deal with various situations where there is uncertainty about the outcome and that the possibility exists for an unfavorable outcome.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3250
Banking and Financial Institutions
3

Focuses on the monetary system; introduction to the financial markets; and regional and national banking institutions including thrifts, savings and loans, credit unions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, investment companies, and money center banks.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3410
Credit Analysis and Commercial Lending
3

Introduces students to credit analysis, credit bureaus, credit ratings, and to the differences between personal and commercial credit. Students receive exposure to how lines of credit are determined as well as various methods individuals and businesses can use to procure funds.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3550
Financial Markets
3

Examines the development of modern financial markets with emphasis on the factors that determine interest rates, pricing mechanisms for fixed-income securities, and private and public raising of financial capital.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 4010
Personal Financial Planning
3

Provides a comprehensive analysis of a financial portfolio including defining the purpose and the individual investments included within that portfolio to assess whether financial goals can/are being met. Students will work to specify realistic financial goals given available resources. Students will gain an awareness of the resources available and sources of income used to obtain the financial goals, as well as an understanding of the risk/reward ratio of each investment alternative.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3550

FIN 4510
International Financial Management
3

Introduces students to investing in non-domestic securities or assets as another way to diversify a portfolio or holdings. Students will explore the various risks--political, exchange rates, foreign taxation, and different reporting methods--that are inherent in international investing. Since foreign investment returns are not correlated with US returns, hedging and various market instabilities can offer unique opportunities for portfolio diversification and will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4010

FIN 4610
Investment Management
3

Acquaints students with the various investment alternatives and examines the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students will be given the opportunity to assess and evaluate investment alternatives using various techniques including fundamental and technical analysis, risk/reward models, and diversification.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4010

FIN 4710
Financial Statement Analysis
3

Explores the use of fundamental financial analysis and valuation techniques when evaluating the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flows statement. The focus of this course is on financial data that can be analyzed to assist in investment, commercial lending, or other economic decisions.

FIN 4910
Finance Seminar
3

Integrates material from previous finance courses through practical application of analysis and assessment of financial markets, corporate financing, and personal financial planning. This is a capstone course for the Bachelor of Business Administration - Finance degree program.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4710

WRKBS2010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 120-hour learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Program completion based on Associate or Bachelor requirements may vary between programs. There may be certain course requirements that require completion prior to enrolling in the work experience course. *Note: Students in the BBA would take this as their first required work experience.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 1010

WRKBS4010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 120-hour learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Program completion based on Associate or Bachelor requirements may vary between programs. There may be certain course requirements that require completion prior to enrolling in the work experience course. *Note: Students in the BBA would take this course as their 2nd required work experience.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKBS2010

Business Requirements

36 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ACC 1010
Principles of Accounting I
3

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

ACC 1020
Principles of Accounting II
3

Enables the students to prepare, evaluate, and use accounting data as an introduction to the accounting profession. The mechanics of financial accounting and the overall effect of accounting procedures on published financial statements are examined in detail. Alternative accounting procedures and their impacts on the financial statements are also examined. Coverage includes extensive examination of the accounting equation as well as the accounting process as it relates to receivables, inventory, fixes assets, and bonds payable.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010

ECN 2010
Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

ECN 2110
Principles of Microeconomics
3

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

FIN 1010
Personal Finance
3

Provides a balanced exposure to development and understanding the various aspects involved in managing one's personal finance.

FIN 3010
Principles of Finance
3

Covers working capital management, capital budgeting issues, a study of the time value of money, financial statement analyses, valuation of financial instruments, term structure of interest rates, and analyses of short- and long-term capital markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1020, MTH 1050 or ACC 1020, MTH 1110

LAW 2110
Business Law
3

Provides students with an introduction to the legal issues inherent in dynamic business environments. Topics covered include the legal system, including an examination of constitutional law; business torts; contracts; intellectual property; criminal law; and the ethical considerations for business decision making.

MGT 1010
Introduction to Business
3

Provides a basic understanding of many aspects of business through an overview of the changing business environment, the roles of small businesses, entrepreneurs, and the importance of customer relations, management, and marketing. Financial management, accounting and banking will also be discussed.

MGT 3110
Organizational Change
3

Examines the effects of environmental change on organizations and organizational systems. Emphasis is placed on sustaining change by building organizational capability involving human resources and organizational practices which have the potential to sustain the organization's ability to continually adapt in a dynamic environment. Topics include organizational behavior, groups and interpersonal influence, strategic interventions, approaches to systems, system analysis and design, implementation techniques, monitoring, complementary human assets, contextual relations, and linkages. Specific examples are drawn from industry experience and models.

MGT 3210
Management Information Systems
3

Explores the role of information systems in organizations. This course covers the major types of information systems and the impact that these systems have on organizations, including how information systems improve decision making and support the business strategy. Information system development and planning are covered, as well as information security and the challenges of future technology changes.

MKT 1110
Principles of Marketing
3

Examines the essentials of an introductory course than can be either a survey course or a prerequisite to more advanced marketing studies. Study includes product identification, positioning and pricing strategies, consumer need identification and making the connection between consumer needs and product advertising, basic distribution strategies, and some of the decision-making tools at the disposal of the marketing manager. This course is recommended as a first course for marketing majors.

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

General Education

30 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Select 1 Course from the Following: Communication Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 2050
Mass Media and Society
3

Introduces the history, technical development, and cultural impact of mass media (books, newspapers, magazines, sound recordings, radio, television, movies, the Internet, and social media, as well as the related areas of public relations and advertising). Examines social factors (i.e. economics, technology, politics, law/regulatory practices, and the consumer culture) that shape media messages. Explores the function and responsibility of mass media in a democratic society, while also analyzing the ethics, power, and influence of modern media.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 2310
Language and Culture
3

Analyzes the English language through history, considering regional variations and dialect acquisition. Students learn to appreciate language by studying language in everyday social interactions in their own lives and communities.  The relationship of linguistic variation to social and cultural identity is discussed, along with multilingualism, expressive speech, sociopolitical uses of language, censorship, and language learning and preservation.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 2410
Creative Writing
3

Introduces the fundamentals of writing for expressive purposes to students at any level of experience in creative writing. Students will produce and revise original works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction using a workshop format. Students will also explore mentor texts in order to analyze various structures, stylistic approaches, and techniques that they will apply to their own works.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 2050
Introduction to Literature: World Masterpieces and Critical Approaches
3

Explores classic foundational texts in the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction). Focuses on understanding literary elements and analyzing texts using close readings and critical literary theory in addition to the skills necessary to write literary essays. Introduces the concepts of literary analysis. Students will understand the influence of these texts in relationship to social and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

SPK 2110
Group Dynamics
3

Prepares students to work effectively in groups. Students will collaborate to complete a group project and multiple presentations. Course content covers key concepts of group dynamics such as diversity, group roles, ethical issues, and conflict resolution. Students will hone group communication skills and effectively use technology to communicate with group members.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 2010

SPK 4010
Professional Speaking
3

Prepares students to compose professional presentations using current technologies. Addresses theory and practice of communication, including research-based content development, organization of a message to achieve a desired outcome, audience and context analysis, presentation tools, and delivery methods. Consideration of diversity, ethics, and relevance to future careers are key components.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 2010

WRI 1150
Workplace Communication
3

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

WRI 3010
Report Writing
3

Addresses the ability to write professionally and ethically for business and technical purposes relevant to a student's major field or career aspirations. Emphasis is on learning and applying rhetorical principles for writing formal reports including researching published technical information. Less formal aspects of business and technical communication are also studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

Select 1 Course from the Following: Global/Cultural Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ECN 3010
International Economics
3

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 2010

GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

HUM 1010
Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)
3

Enhances the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

HUM 1020
Art and Architecture II (Renaissance to Modern)
3

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Renaissance period to the present are studied.

HUM 3610
Art Appreciation
3

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

HUM 3650
Music Appreciation
3

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

POL 3110
International Relations
3

Includes the study of the evolution of the modern international system, International Relations theories, state sovereignty and state power, foreign policy analysis, contemporary conflict and conflict resolution, global terrorism, global economic governance, poverty aid and development globalization, human rights and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 1020
Spanish II
3

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed the introductory/previous course. This course continues to develop the student's ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 1010

Select 1 Course from the Following: Mathematics Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
MTH 1050
Quantitative Reasoning I
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1060
Quantitative Reasoning II
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, regression, voting methods, and graph theory. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

MTH 1210
Trigonometry
3

Analyzes trigonometric functions, their properties, solution of right and oblique triangles, radian measure, graphs, vectors, trigonometric equations, and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120

MTH 1310
Pre-Calculus
5

Examines functions, their inverses, graphs, and properties. Students solve equations and real-world problems involving polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics also addressed are: conic sections, complex numbers, vectors, sequences and series. Limits are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110 or MTH 1210

MTH 1410
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
3

Focuses on the applications of discrete mathematics in computer science. This course includes set theory, propositional logic, relations, Boolean algebra, and minimization of equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310 or MTH 1210

MTH 1510
Calculus I
4

Examines the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems. Antiderivatives, and the process of integration are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 or MTH 1310

MTH 2510
Calculus II
4

Explores integration of functions, ordinary differential equations, series and sequences, and their application. Techniques of integration, improper integrals, convergence and divergence of various types of series and sequences, and applications related to area, volume, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar equations are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

MTH 3510
Multivariable Calculus
4

Examines functions of several variables, vector calculus, multiple integrals, and partial differentiation.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

MTH 3550
Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
4

Examines algebra of matrices, vectors in space, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues, linear transformations, and the applications of matrix methods to find solutions to systems of linear equations and linear programming problems. Also examines the principles and methods for solving and applying first, second, and higher order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

Select 1 Course from the Following: Personal/Social Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ECN 2010
Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

ECN 2110
Principles of Microeconomics
3

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

POL 3010
American Political Systems
3

Provides a brief introduction to the political science discipline, and then examines United States government and politics at the national, state, and local levels. Areas of study include the United States Constitution, federalism, representation and participation, the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and civil liberties, domestic and foreign policies, and government and politics in Michigan.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

PSY 1010
Human Relations
3

Provides a psychological foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional settings. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective strategies to improve human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

PSY 1110
General Psychology
3

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

PSY 2010
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
3

Examines the background, theory, and process of cognitive behavioral therapy. Topics include maladaptive thought patterns and cognitive behavioral therapy solutions, several expressions of cognitive behavior therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy applications to common problems such as fear, anger, addiction, anxiety, and depression.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2110
Psychology of Death and Dying
3

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theories related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 2210
Developmental Psychology
3

Examines changes that occur across the human lifespan, from conception to end of life. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2310
Industrial Organizational Psychology
3

Explores psychological foundations, theories, models, and applications related to selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, organizational culture, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 2410
Theories of Counseling
3

Provides a foundation for understanding the field of counseling. This course examines what counselors do; the qualities of effective counseling; and basic concepts of the most influential theories of modern counseling, considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. It also examines legal, ethical, and cross-cultural issues.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3110
Abnormal Psychology
3

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3210
Psychology of Disability
3

Explores types of disabilities from the individual, family, and caregiver perspectives. Topics include stereotypes and myths, legal issues/laws, coping with disability, and models of practice. Common challenges and solutions associated with disability across various social contexts are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3350
Human Sexuality
3

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and awareness of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 3410
Child Psychology
3

Explores human development from conception through late childhood, with an emphasis on physical, mental, social, and emotional growth. Developmental processes of socialization, cognition, emotional growth, and personality development are examined. Theories about child development are assessed. Research findings on issues and disorders common to children are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210

PSY 3510
Adolescent Psychology
3

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. The emphasis is on establishing skills necessary to work with this group. Areas of focus include physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents. Research findings on issues and disorders common to adolescents are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 4010
Social Psychology
3

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 4050
Psychopharmacology
3

Studies the history and development of psychopharmacological agents, their effects on the biochemistry of the human being, the legitimate use of medications, and their importance for treatment. Topics include a review of the classes of psychotropic drugs, drug overdose, the side effects and interactions of psychotropic drugs, and drug tolerance.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 3110

PSY 4110
Clinical Methods in Mental Healt h
3

Examines the multiple careers and settings associated with mental health treatment. Topics include assessment, interviewing, types of counseling, treatment of different populations, legal issues, and ethical considerations within the mental health treatment setting. Treatment interventions, least restrictive options, and prevention will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2410, PSY 3110

PSY 4150
Gerontology
3

Explores aging from the individual, family, and caregiver perspectives. Focuses on physical, cognitive, personality, and social development in late adulthood. Topics include stereotypes and myths, legal issues/laws, common psychological and physical disorders, end of life decisions, relationships, and careers, as well as the dying process, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210

SOC 2010
Sociology
3

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

SOC 3010
Social Problems
3

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 2010

Select 1 Course from the Following: Science Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
HSC 1110
Introduction to Healthcare
3

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

HSC 1210
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1211

HSC 1220
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Focuses on the physiology of the body system on a cellular level and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1221

HSC 1250
Introduction to Disease
3

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

HSC 2150
Pathophysiology
3

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

HSC 2210
Nutrition
3

Teaches students how the logic of science is applied to basic nutrition concerns, including food groups and recommended nutritional guidelines.

HSC 2310
Biochemistry
3

Provides an overview of biochemical structures and reactions that occur in living systems. Emphasis is placed on the areas of energy, proteins, and catalysis as well as metabolism and molecular genetics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

HSC 2410
Microbiology
3

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A laboratory may be taken concurrently with the lecture course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2411

HSC 3110
Health Law and Regulations
3

Addresses legal issues, restraints, and problems arising from organization and delivery of healthcare services. Topics to be included are: tort law; hospital, physician, nurse, and other health professional's liability; informed consent; medical records; legal reporting obligations; abortion; autopsy, donation and experimentation; sterilization and artificial insemination; euthanasia; patient rights and responsibilities; labor relation; insurance; trial procedures; and restraint of trade are topics which are included.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 3150
Planning and Evaluation of Health Services
3

Researches and examines the steps to planning, implementation, and evaluation of health services. Includes the development of measurable objectives and the compilation and presentation of a report.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 4010
Healthcare Administration
3

Studies the basic principles of healthcare administration including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The emphasis will be on administration of hospitals, organizational structure, trustee responsibility, medical staff relationships, third-party payors, and fiscal management.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4110
Seminar in Health Issues
3

Studies current healthcare issues such as managed care, health insurance, foreign healthcare systems, and the policies of healthcare. Individual or group projects will be a component of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 4010, HSC 4210, HSC 4310, HSC 3150

HSC 4210
Ethics for Health Professionals
3

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4310
Health System Finance
3

Examines basic accounting principles and finance in healthcare settings. Considerations in budgetary preparation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

SCI 2150
Integrated Physics
3

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110, MTH 1120, MTH 1210

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1060 or MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton’s laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510, SCI 2510L

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

SCI 3210
Principles of Astronomy
3

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

SCI 4510
Environmental Science
3

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

Select 1 Group from the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
MTH 1050
Quantitative Reasoning I (Group A)
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1060
Quantitative Reasoning II (Group A)
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, regression, voting methods, and graph theory. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

MTH 1110
College Algebra I (Group B)
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II (Group B)
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

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