Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
120 Hours

Major

90 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ACC 1010
Principles of Accounting I
3

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

CIS 1010
Introduction to Computer Applications
3

Introduces students to modern office software and applications. Applications presented include word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software.

MGT 1010
Introduction to Business
3

Provides a basic understanding of many aspects of business through an overview of the changing business environment, the roles of small businesses, entrepreneurs, and the importance of customer relations, management, and marketing. Financial management, accounting and banking will also be discussed.

PAR 1010
Law, Legal Profession, and Terminology
3

Provides a basic understanding of the procedural and practical aspects of being a paralegal. Emphasis is on legal terminology, legal concepts, skills needed to perform paralegal tasks, and the ethical considerations involved. Must complete with a C or better.

PAR 1150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis I
3

Provides students with a general understanding of the nature of legal research including book research, online legal research tools, and legal citation forms using specific techniques and methodologies. Students will develop research strategies that will enable them to begin drafting documents. The mechanics of the construction of documents will be examined. Students will learn how to review and analyze case law and legal materials in the preparation of writing case briefs, pleadings, and motions. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

PAR 1410
Law Office Technology, Management, and Ethics
3

Introduces basic legal software and computer technology utilized in an office. Topics include billing, time slips, electronic filing, docketing and calendaring, hiring and supervision of personnel, delegation of work to associates and legal assistants, and the ethical implications of each. Must complete with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
CIS 1010

PAR 2010
Torts
3

Introduces students to tort law, including intentional torts such as assault and battery; torts based on the failure to use reasonable care such as negligence; and strict liability torts, which make the actor liable without any fault for dangerous activities such as mining and blasting operations. In the introduction of negligence, students will become familiar with the four elements of all negligence lawsuits, which include duty, breach of duty, proximate causation, and damages. Major areas of tort litigation will be examined including products liability. Must complete with a C or better.

PAR 2110
Criminal Law and Procedures
3

Introduces students to the various offenses that constitute a crime as well as the general principles of culpability and justification. Constitutional safeguards and procedures necessary from arrest through the trial, sentencing, and punishment will be examined. The First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments will be examined. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis II
3

Provides a capstone experience in legal research and writing for the paralegal program. This course will reinforce and continue to develop the high level research skills necessary for today's paralegals. Manual and CALR methods will be expounded upon for further skill refinement. Written and oral communications will continue to be a focus as students demonstrate their proficiency in this area through an extensive legal research project that requires them to produce the applicable legal documentation and then present their findings as they would in the legal setting. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2310
Wills, Trusts, and Probate Administration
3

Familiarizes students with the basic elements of a will, types of wills as well as the responsibilities of a personal representative. Classes of trusts and rules governing trusts will be examined. Discussion will include the purposes of estate planning, probate forms and procedures, and guardianships. Students will assess and analyze tax ramifications of estate plans as well as the different classifications of property. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1150

PAR 2410
Contract Law
3

Introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices associated with contract law. Topics include the elements of a binding legal contract, such as the offer, acceptance, and consideration, the distinction between the common law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) treatment of contracts, the study of sales transactions and commercial contracts, an analysis of the concept of performance and the legal remedies available for breach of contract, and the preparation of valid contractual agreements. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2710
Family Law
3

Introduces students to the areas of law related to marriage, divorce, separation, annulment, guardianship, and adoption. Topics discussed may include custody, child support, alimony, property distribution, and domestic partnerships, as well as the role of the attorney and paralegal in interviewing, determining jurisdiction, counseling, investigating, drafting, serving and filing of legal papers. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2910
Civil Litigation
3

Introduces students to the stages of a lawsuit, including pretrial, trial, and post-trial procedures. Preparation of pleadings, motions, and subpoenas will be examined. This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of discovery including interviewing techniques and case investigations. The Michigan Court Rules will also be examined. This course provides a capstone experience for the paralegal student, taking a case from its inception to conclusion. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2150

PAR 3150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis III
3

Teaches advanced legal drafting and writing. Students will not only use manual legal materials and online legal databases, but will be exposed to other research sources as well. Students will continue to review and analyze case law and legal materials in the preparation of writing pleadings, motions and memoranda, trial and/or appellate briefs, and research summaries. Unique problems of legal research will be explored. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2150

PAR 3410
Elder Law
3

Provides an overview of the legal issues facing our aging population. Topics covered may include estate planning, health and personal care planning, advance directives, financial powers of attorney, availability of benefits including Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans, Medicare and Medicaid, alternative housing arrangements such as assisted living facilities and nursing homes, elder abuse and neglect, and ethical issues inherent in the area of elder law. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010, PAR 2310

PAR 3510
Property and Real Estate Law
3

Exposes students to the practical side of real property transactions, emphasizing the residential process. Students will learn about preparing and recording documents for transfer of title, including purchase and sale agreements, mortgages and deeds, financing, the closing process, and landlord-tenant relationships. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3610
Employment and Labor Law
3

Provides an overview of the laws that deal with the employment relationship, such as hiring and firing, wages and benefits, hours and overtime, and working conditions. Topics covered may include the various types of discrimination, federal wage and hour regulation, the concept of at-will employment, labor law, privacy laws, harassment in the workplace, workplace injuries and remedies, and employee handbooks. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3710
Debtor/Creditor Law (Bankruptcy)
3

Introduces and familiarizes students with the legal issues, rights and remedies involving debtors and creditors. Topics covered may include Chapter 7 bankruptcy liquidation, Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization, and Chapter 13 wage-earner plans, as well as the areas of receivership, garnishments, secured creditors, and liens. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4210
Administrative Law
3

Provides an overview of administrative law, namely those rules and regulations set forth by agencies of government whether at the state, local or federal level. We will address the function of administrative agencies, as well as how these agencies operate. Topics may include rule-making, constitutional and statutory limitations on agency operation, and specific administrative policies. The course will also discuss the role of the paralegal and the possibility of paralegal representation during administrative hearings. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4310
Advanced Legal Technology and Software
3

Provides students with hands-on practical application of specialized legal software and computer technology in the legal setting. Topics may include a more advanced discussion of technology and software options introduced in introductor/previous courses and may include time management, billing, calendaring and docketing, document management, word processing, legal research, litigation support and trial presentation software, and specialty areas of law. Electronic filing and discovery, as well as the paperless office, will also be examined. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4410
Business Organizations
3

Examines the different forms of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Students will learn the distinguishing characteristics of different business entities, the benefits and limitations of each of them, and the legal processes necessary for their formation. The respective rights, duties, and liabilities of businesses' officers, directors and shareholders, business disputes, and corporate dissolutions are studied. Students will learn to draft appropriate documents for the formation of Michigan business organizations and will apply legal reasoning and legal analysis to particular fact patterns to assess legal issues and reach conclusions about the legality, validity, appropriateness, or resolution of particular issues involving business organizations. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4910
Evidence (Litigation II)
3

Provides a capstone experience for the legal studies students and covers an overview of general evidentiary principles and application in the trial process. Topics may include relevancy of evidence, judicial notice, weight and sufficiency of evidence, burden of proof, competency of witnesses, objections to evidence, admissibility, and rules relating to examination and cross-examination of witnesses, including the concept of hearsay and its exceptions. This course will also discuss the role of the paralegal in the litigation process and emphasize the skills necessary for a litigation paralegal. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2910

SOC 2010
Sociology
3

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

WRK 2150
Paralegal Work Experience
3

Requires students, in this capstone field experience, to perform 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experiences in a legal setting. General paralegal duties will be performed.

Select 2 Courses from the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
PAR 3350
Healthcare and Insurance Law
3

Provides an overview of the current issues in healthcare and insurance law. Topics may include malpractice by physicians and hospitals, tort reform and its impact on the health system, a discussion of insurance coverage, including private health insurance policies, Medicare, Medicaid, disability, long-term care and no-fault insurance, issues relating to access to healthcare as well as access to records, HIPAA and confidentiality of patient information, and advance directives. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3450
Alternative Dispute Resolution
3

Provides an overview of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) as an alternative to traditional litigation. The basic methods of ADR, including binding as well as non-binding arbitration, mediation and negotiation, will be discussed. Students will learn the main areas where disputes often arise, how one or more methods of ADR apply, and how to determine the most appropriate method for resolving a matter. Topics covered may include the various forms of ADR, the application of ADR to specific disputes in various areas of the law, sources of ADR services, and the role of the paralegal in ADR. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4350
Immigration Law
3

Provides an overview of the structure of immigration law, practice and procedure. Students will learn how to recognize the legal issues, prepare petitions and applications, and learn when, why, and where filings should be made. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of immigration law, as well as the general procedures, terminology, and agencies that are involved in this area of law. Topics may include completing standard immigration forms, researching immigration law, and accessing government and other online materials relating to this field. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4450
Intellectual Property Law
3

Covers the field of intellectual property law, including the areas of copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets and patents. Students will gain a basic background in intellectual property law and will be introduced to the skills that are required of an intellectual property paralegal. Topics may include ownership of works, the fair use doctrine, registration of copyrights, trademarks and patents, infringement of rights, trade secrets, and use of online research tools in the area of intellectual property. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

Select 2 Courses from the Following: Literature Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
EDU 2210
Children's Literature
3

Analyzes and evaluates various classical and contemporary works written for children. Students will apply critical reading and writing skills to the exploration of various genres and the conventions that define those genres. In addition, the course will focus on developing strategies for engaging young readers in developmentally appropriate books. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 2050
Introduction to Literature: World Masterpieces and Critical Approaches
3

Explores classic foundational texts in the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction). Focuses on understanding literary elements and analyzing texts using close readings and critical literary theory in addition to the skills necessary to write literary essays. Introduces the concepts of literary analysis. Students will understand the influence of these texts in relationship to social and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3110
British Literature: Beginning to Neoclassicism
3

Surveys major British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Students will study the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) and apply close reading strategies and critical literary theory to analyze texts. Students will explore various aspects of historical periods; understand how the assigned works reflect changing social, political, and religious thoughts of each period; and then compare themes from era to era.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3150
British Literature: Romanticism to Modernism
3

Surveys British literature from the Romantic (including Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats) through the Modernist period. In addition to major authors, the course will also cover British literary movements and their historical, political, and social contexts. Students will apply basic literary analysis and critical theories to their written assessments in the course, including essays and written exams.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3310
Survey of American Literature
3

Surveys North American literature of various genres from pre-colonial times through the Modernist movement. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American voices, including Native American oral tradition. Students will critically analyze and write about literature applying proper terminology, research, and critical theories from the field of literary studies.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 4050
Young Adult Literature
3

Introduces students to literature written for and about young people. Students will read and analyze contemporary and classical middle grade and young adult literature, exploring various genres, commonly recurring themes, and defining features.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 4210
Contemporary Literature
3

Studies twentieth and twenty-first century world literature written in or translated to English. Explores historical, political, and cultural contexts in which contemporary literature is produced and received, establishing a consciousness of the functions of literature during this period. Applies a range of critical perspectives and examines recurring themes and genres. Engages students in the verbal and written analysis of complex written texts representative of the literary movements of the time.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

Select 2 Courses from the Following

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 2050
Mass Media and Society
0

Introduces the history, technical development, and cultural impact of mass media (books, newspapers, magazines, sound recordings, radio, television, movies, the Internet, and social media, as well as the related areas of public relations and advertising). Examines social factors (i.e. economics, technology, politics, law/regulatory practices, and the consumer culture) that shape media messages. Explores the function and responsibility of mass media in a democratic society, while also analyzing the ethics, power, and influence of modern media.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 2310
Language and Culture
3

Analyzes the English language through history, considering regional variations and dialect acquisition. Students learn to appreciate language by studying language in everyday social interactions in their own lives and communities.  The relationship of linguistic variation to social and cultural identity is discussed, along with multilingualism, expressive speech, sociopolitical uses of language, censorship, and language learning and preservation.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 2410
Creative Writing
3

Introduces the fundamentals of writing for expressive purposes to students at any level of experience in creative writing. Students will produce and revise original works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction using a workshop format. Students will also explore mentor texts in order to analyze various structures, stylistic approaches, and techniques that they will apply to their own works.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 3010
Structures of English
3

Examines contemporary English grammar, including syntactic structures and the elements of traditional grammar and their usage. This will be done by analyzing syntax, parts of speech, and other grammatical elements both independently and in context.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

Select 1 Course from the Following: History Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
EDU 3110
Social Studies for Elementary Teachers
3

Integrates the disciplines of economics, geography, history, and political science, to provide an overview of the concepts, methods, and relationship between the disciplines. Provides necessary content, resources, and pedagogy for the elementary social studies teacher. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, GEO 1010, GEO 1020, HIS 3410, POL 3010

HIS 3410
United States History to 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history from the pre-colonial period to 1877. This course examines how the nation evolved and studies how the past has created a distinctive American character that continues to have an impact on the nation and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3420
United States History Since 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history since 1877. This course examines American domestic history and analyzes how and why the United States became a global power. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3410

HIS 3510
World History I
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3520
World History II
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.300 CE to c.1500 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3510

HIS 3530
World History III
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in world history from c.1500 CE to c. 1789 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3520

HIS 3540
World History IV
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.1789 CE to the present, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3610
Michigan History
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in Michigan history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Analyzes the contributions of prominent Michiganians, and the relationship between the history of Michigan, the United States, and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of Michigan history.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 4910
Senior Seminar: History and Social Studies
3

Examines the philosophy of history as a discipline, some varieties of history, the relationship of history to the other social studies content areas, historical methods of research and interpretation, the utility and applications of history, and some major historiographical debates in United States and world history. Serves as the capstone course for the history and social studies program.

Select 1 Course from the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

POL 3110
International Relations
3

Includes the study of the evolution of the modern international system, International Relations theories, state sovereignty and state power, foreign policy analysis, contemporary conflict and conflict resolution, global terrorism, global economic governance, poverty aid and development globalization, human rights and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

PSY 2110
Psychology of Death and Dying
3

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theories related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2210
Developmental Psychology
3

Examines changes that occur across the human lifespan, from conception to end of life. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2310
Industrial Organizational Psychology
3

Explores psychological foundations, theories, models, and applications related to selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, organizational culture, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010

PSY 3350
Human Sexuality
3

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and awareness of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010

PSY 3510
Adolescent Psychology
3

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. The emphasis is on establishing skills necessary to work with this group. Areas of focus include physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents. Research findings on issues and disorders common to adolescents are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 4010
Social Psychology
3

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

SOC 3010
Social Problems
3

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 2010

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 1020
Spanish II
3

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed the introductory/previous course. This course continues to develop the student's ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 1010

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