Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
133 Hours

English Major

30 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 2310
Language and Culture
3

Analyzes the English language through history, considering regional variations and dialect acquisition. Students learn to appreciate language by studying language in everyday social interactions in their own lives and communities.  The relationship of linguistic variation to social and cultural identity is discussed, along with multilingualism, expressive speech, sociopolitical uses of language, censorship, and language learning and preservation.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 2410
Creative Writing
3

Introduces the fundamentals of writing for expressive purposes to students at any level of experience in creative writing. Students will produce and revise original works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction using a workshop format. Students will also explore mentor texts in order to analyze various structures, stylistic approaches, and techniques that they will apply to their own works.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 3010
Structures of English
3

Examines contemporary English grammar, including syntactic structures and the elements of traditional grammar and their usage. This will be done by analyzing syntax, parts of speech, and other grammatical elements both independently and in context.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 4910
Senior Seminar: English and Language Arts
3

Cultivates a broad mastery of English and Language Arts content and the ability to translate theoretical principles into practical applications. Students must assess their knowledge of English and Language Arts subject matter; identify, remediate, and evaluate growth in weak areas; and integrate and apply the full spectrum of knowledge across the English and Language Arts curriculum. Students must distinguish themselves as analytic and reflective problem solvers in the examination of the history, scholarly literature, issues, standards, and the professional community of English and Language Arts educators.

LIT 2050
Introduction to Literature: World Masterpieces and Critical Approaches
3

Explores classic foundational texts in the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction). Focuses on understanding literary elements and analyzing texts using close readings and critical literary theory in addition to the skills necessary to write literary essays. Introduces the concepts of literary analysis. Students will understand the influence of these texts in relationship to social and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3110
British Literature: Beginning to Neoclassicism
3

Surveys major British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Students will study the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) and apply close reading strategies and critical literary theory to analyze texts. Students will explore various aspects of historical periods; understand how the assigned works reflect changing social, political, and religious thoughts of each period; and then compare themes from era to era.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

LIT 3150
British Literature: Romanticism to Modernism
3

Surveys British literature from the Romantic (including Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats) through the Modernist period. In addition to major authors, the course will also cover British literary movements and their historical, political, and social contexts. Students will apply basic literary analysis and critical theories to their written assessments in the course, including essays and written exams.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

LIT 3310
Survey of American Literature
3

Surveys North American literature of various genres from pre-colonial times through the Modernist movement. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American voices, including Native American oral tradition. Students will critically analyze and write about literature applying proper terminology, research, and critical theories from the field of literary studies.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

LIT 4050
Young Adult Literature
3

Introduces students to literature written for and about young people. Students will read and analyze contemporary and classical middle grade and young adult literature, exploring various genres, commonly recurring themes, and defining features.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 4210
Contemporary Literature
3

Studies twentieth and twenty-first century world literature written in or translated to English. Explores historical, political, and cultural contexts in which contemporary literature is produced and received, establishing a consciousness of the functions of literature during this period. Applies a range of critical perspectives and examines recurring themes and genres. Engages students in the verbal and written analysis of complex written texts representative of the literary movements of the time.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

Social Studies Major

39 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ECN 2010
Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

ECN 2110
Principles of Microeconomics
3

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

HIS 3410
United States History to 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history from the pre-colonial period to 1877. This course examines how the nation evolved and studies how the past has created a distinctive American character that continues to have an impact on the nation and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3420
United States History Since 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history since 1877. This course examines American domestic history and analyzes how and why the United States became a global power. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, HIS 3410

HIS 3510
World History I
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3520
World History II
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.300 CE to c.1500 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, HIS 3510

HIS 3530
World History III
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in world history from c.1500 CE to c. 1789 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, HIS 3520

HIS 3540
World History IV
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.1789 CE to the present, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, HIS 3530

HIS 4910
Senior Seminar: History and Social Studies
3

Examines the philosophy of history as a discipline, some varieties of history, the relationship of history to the other social studies content areas, historical methods of research and interpretation, the utility and applications of history, and some major historiographical debates in United States and world history. Serves as the capstone course for the history and social studies program.

POL 3010
American Political Systems
3

Provides a brief introduction to the political science discipline, and then examines United States government and politics at the national, state, and local levels. Areas of study include the United States Constitution, federalism, representation and participation, the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and civil liberties, domestic and foreign policies, and government and politics in Michigan.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

POL 3110
International Relations
3

Includes the study of the evolution of the modern international system, International Relations theories, state sovereignty and state power, foreign policy analysis, contemporary conflict and conflict resolution, global terrorism, global economic governance, poverty aid and development globalization, human rights and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

Professional Education Requirements

40 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
EDU 2010
Introduction to Professional Education Experiences
3

Introduces candidates to the realities of the teaching profession, the structure and operation of schools, current educational issues and trends, and the foundations of education. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 3120
Educational Psychology
3

Focuses on the learning process including the role of the teacher in learning; efficiency of learning as it is affected by the developmental processes; psychological principles that are central to the learning process and their relationship to the teaching situation; variables in learning; and evaluation of the outcomes of learning. Emphasizes application of learning theory and multicultural concepts in a field-based context. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3310
The Exceptional Learner
3

Studies the physical, psychological, social, and educational factors related to exceptional individuals, including intellectually gifted, English language learners, and the handicapped. Emphasizes collaborative historical, legal, legislative, and futuristic aspects of educating the exceptional learner. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3120

EDU 3460
Integrating Technology into 21st Century Learning
3

Introduces selection, evaluation, and use of appropriate media, including microcomputers and Web-based learning, as an integral part of the curriculum to achieve stated learning objectives. Provides hands-on experience in preparing and using leading edge technology, materials and equipment for effective classroom learning. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3810
Service Learning Project
1

Provides an opportunity for students to work on a service learning project that applies their professional skills in a civic assignment that addresses the needs of the community. The students work with the instructor to design, implement, and evaluate the project. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, POL 3010

EDU 4250
Literacy Education in the Secondary School
3

Introduces the theoretical foundation for literacy development and the methods and processes in developmentally appropriate instruction. Emphasizes the principles, techniques, and processes of literacy instruction needed to help candidates become independent, strategic learners in the content areas taught in middle and high schools. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in grade 6-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3310

EDU 4310
Instructional Design and Assessment
3

Prepares candidates to design curriculum and assessments aligned to state and national standards. Instructional design principles as well as formative and summative assessment practices will be covered. Practice using assessment data to drive curricular and instructional decisions. Emphasis on teaching and learning for all students. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3310

EDU 4410
Classroom Development
3

Focuses on classroom development techniques, which lead to the creation of a positive, democratic learning environment. The techniques learned will help P-12 students monitor and adjust behavior in order to achieve self-discipline. The culminating activity is a Classroom Development Plan. This course requires 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4550

EDU 4450
Educational Foundations
2

Studies education and schooling in American culture and society. Focuses on the interpretation and appraisal of current educational practices and trends. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4810

EDU 4550
Theory and Techniques of Instruction I
3

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4560

EDU 4560
Theory and Techniques of Instruction II
3

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

EDU 4810
Directed Teaching
10

Requires candidates to observe and teach in P-12 classroom settings for approximately 18 weeks during regular school hours, following the school district calendar and the supervising teacher's contractual agreement. Attendance at professional development conferences and seminars may be required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4450

General Education

24 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

MTH 2710
Probability and Statistics for Educators
3

Introduces students to statistical methods common to educators. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, present, summarize, and interpret data using graphical and numerical methods; calculate probability, including binomial probability, and apply probability distributions; and utilize linear regression analysis to describe relationships in bivariate data. (Online only)

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120 or MTH 1310

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Select 1 Course from the Following: Scientific Inquiry

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
HSC 1110
Introduction to Healthcare
3

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

HSC 1210
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1211

HSC 1220
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Focuses on the physiology of the body system on a cellular level and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1221

HSC 1250
Introduction to Disease
3

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

HSC 2150
Pathophysiology
3

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

HSC 2210
Nutrition
3

Teaches students how the logic of science is applied to basic nutrition concerns, including food groups and recommended nutritional guidelines.

HSC 2310
Biochemistry
3

Provides an overview of biochemical structures and reactions that occur in living systems. Emphasis is placed on the areas of energy, proteins, and catalysis as well as metabolism and molecular genetics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

HSC 2410
Microbiology
3

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A laboratory may be taken concurrently with the lecture course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2411

HSC 3110
Health Law and Regulations
3

Addresses legal issues, restraints, and problems arising from organization and delivery of healthcare services. Topics to be included are: tort law; hospital, physician, nurse, and other health professional's liability; informed consent; medical records; legal reporting obligations; abortion; autopsy, donation and experimentation; sterilization and artificial insemination; euthanasia; patient rights and responsibilities; labor relation; insurance; trial procedures; and restraint of trade are topics which are included.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 3150
Planning and Evaluation of Health Services
3

Researches and examines the steps to planning, implementation, and evaluation of health services. Includes the development of measurable objectives and the compilation and presentation of a report.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 4010
Healthcare Administration
3

Studies the basic principles of healthcare administration including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The emphasis will be on administration of hospitals, organizational structure, trustee responsibility, medical staff relationships, third-party payors, and fiscal management.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4110
Seminar in Health Issues
3

Studies current healthcare issues such as managed care, health insurance, foreign healthcare systems, and the policies of healthcare. Individual or group projects will be a component of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 4010, HSC 4210, HSC 4310, HSC 3150

HSC 4210
Ethics for Health Professionals
3

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4310
Health System Finance
3

Examines basic accounting principles and finance in healthcare settings. Considerations in budgetary preparation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

SCI 2150
Integrated Physics
3

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110, MTH 1120, MTH 1210

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1060 or MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton’s laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510, SCI 2510L

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

SCI 3210
Principles of Astronomy
3

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

SCI 4510
Environmental Science
3

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

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