Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
120 Hours

Electrical Engineering Major

87 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
CS 1110
Introduction to Programming
3

Introduces students to programming concepts such as logic and flow charting as well as some basic programming techniques.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1110

CS 2150
C++ Programming
3

Introduces program design and development in the C++ language. Uses Microsoft Visual C++ to provide students with experience using visual development tools. Students will demonstrate the ability to use C++ to design solutions to problems, modify existing C++ programs, and develop complex object-oriented applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1110, MTH 1110

EE 2110
Circuits and Electronics I
4

Introduces the analysis of analog and digital circuits. Covers voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Introduces digital logic, logic gates, the MOSFET, and single-stage amplifiers. Emphasizes network theorems, node and mesh analysis, and nonlinear analysis. Covers sinusoidal excitation, phasors, steady-state AC analysis, and the operational amplifier (op-amp). Includes computer analysis and simulation. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
EGR 2710, SCI 2520

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 2110L

EE 2120
Circuits and Electronics II
4

Introduces the analysis of analog and digital circuits. Covers voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Introduces digital logic, logic gates, the MOSFET, and single-stage amplifiers. Emphasizes network theorems, node and mesh analysis, and nonlinear analysis. Covers sinusoidal excitation, phasors, steady-state AC analysis, and the operational amplifier (op-amp). Includes computer analysis and simulation. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110

Corequisite(s):
MTH 3550

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 2120L

EE 2210
Digital Logic and Circuits
3

Introduces discrete-state logic, circuits, and systems. Covers number bases and integer arithmetic, digital electronic parameters, logic circuits and gates, and combinational logic design using Boolean algebra and computer tools. Covers adders, comparators, encoders and decoders, multiplexers and de-multiplexers, and parity generators. Continues with latches and flip-flops, synchronous logic design, and finite state machines. Includes hardware description languages.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120 OR MTH 1310

EE 3130
Circuits and Electronics III
4

Introduces semiconductor physics and devices. Covers the p-n junction, diode, bipolar transistor, metal-semiconductor junction, and MOSFET. Emphasizes biasing, small-signal analysis, single-stage amplifier design, and frequency response. Includes bipolar and CMOS differential amplifiers, feedback, and stability. Addresses digital circuits including static CMOS, dynamic logic, pass-transistor logic, and integrated circuits. Includes computer simulation of digital circuits. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3130L

EE 3210A
Microprocessors and Microcontrollers
3

Presents microprocessor architecture, including instruction sets, addressing modes, memory organization, interrupts, timers, and peripherals. Covers analog, digital, and wireless interfacing. Emphasizes programming in ARM Cortex-M assembly language, and extends coverage of C programming from CS2170, with an emphasis on features common in embedded systems: peripheral interfacing, real-time constraints, and networking.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3250, EE 3270

EE 3250
Automation and Control
2

Focuses on industrial automation systems. Includes sensors, data acquisition, measurement systems; motor drives, process control; Proportional/ Integral/ Derivative (PID) control, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's). Introduces LabView and ‘virtual instruments.'

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3210, EE 3270

EE 3270
Microprocessor/Automation Control Lab
1

Explores and applies the theories and techniques of microprocessors and automation/control in extended laboratory exercises. 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3210, EE 3250

EE 3410
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
4

Reviews vector analysis. Analyzes static electric fields, steady electric currents, and static magnetic fields, in free space and material media. Presents time-varying electromagnetic fields, the EM spectrum, and Maxwell's Equations. Analyzes time-harmonic fields with phasors. Analyzes planar EM waves, transmission lines, waveguides, cavity resonators, and simple antennas.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120

Corequisite(s):
MTH 3510

EE 3610
Dynamic Systems and Control
3

Introduces mathematical modeling of mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems in graphical and state equation form. This course includes time and frequency response of linear systems and linear feedback control.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120, MTH 3550

EE 4310
Signals and Systems
3

Analyzes continuous and discrete-time signals. Covers continuous linear time-invariant systems, causality, impulse response, superposition, and convolution. Includes Fourier series, Fourier transforms, spectra, the Sampling theorem, frequency response, and filtering. Includes digital signal processing using the discrete Fourier transform and computer modeling/simulation.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3610, MTH 3550

EE 4510
Energy Conversion and Power Electronics
4

Introduces power electronics, including power diodes and rectifiers, thyristors, and transistors. Analyzes DC-DC and DC-AC converters, and inverters. Covers magnetic circuits, inductors, transformers, and motor drives. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4510L

EE 4610
Robotics
3

Continues topics of computer control into robotic devices. Covers methods of robotic programming and robotic sensing. Discusses types and applications of robotic devices within industry and healthcare. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3250

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4610L

EGR 1050
Introduction to Engineering and Design
2

Surveys the profession of engineering across several disciplines. Analysis and design problem-solving examples are used with hands-on activities. A design project introduces the engineering design process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 1050L

EGR 2710
Computing for Engineers
2

Introduces students to programs useful for solving engineering problems. Covers the design and implementation of algorithms and topics in computer programming: arrays, files, functions, pointers, and structured data types. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 2710L

EGR 3210
Engineering Economy I
2

Introduces the foundations of engineering economy. Students will develop an understanding and the ability to work problems that account for the time value of money, cash flow, and equivalence at different interest rates. The techniques are mastered from the basis of how an engineer in any discipline can take economic value into account in virtually any project environment. Eight factors commonly used in engineering economy computations are introduced and applied. One or more engineering alternatives are formulated to solve a problem or provide specified results. Different methods by which one or more alternatives can be evaluated economically using factors and formulas learned.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

EGR 4910
Engineering Project Management
3

Emphasizes estimating methods for bidding and scheduling jobs, project management strategies for planning and assigning work, and administrative procedures for tracking progress and changes in job requirements. Includes critical path scheduling, resource allocation, and client interfacing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350, EGR 3210 OR CQI 3210, EGR 3210 OR EE 3130, EGR 3210 OR EGR 3210, ME 3270, ME 3410

Corequisite(s):
CE 4220 OR EE 4510 OR ISE 3350 OR ME 4310

EGR 4920
Senior Design Project
2

Continues the topics an engineering project management while using concepts from civil engineering courses. Teams of students undertake a design project, build and document it, then demonstrate and present it to a group of peers. This is a capstone course in which students use everything learned throughout the program. 30 hours of contact time are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 4910

ELECTIVE
Electrical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ELECTIVE
Electrical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ELECTIVE
Electrical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ME 2110
Materials Science
4

Introduces the principles of engineering materials. This course covers the correlation of the internal structure and service conditions with the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of metals, polymers, and ceramics. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 2460

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2110L

MTH 2510
Calculus II
4

Explores integration of functions, ordinary differential equations, series and sequences, and their application. Techniques of integration, improper integrals, convergence and divergence of various types of series and sequences, and applications related to area, volume, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar equations are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

MTH 3510
Multivariable Calculus
4

Examines functions of several variables, vector calculus, multiple integrals, and partial differentiation.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

MTH 3550
Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
4

Examines the algebra of matrices, vectors in space, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues, linear transformations, and the applications of matrix methods to find solutions to systems of linear equations and linear programming problems. Also examines the principles and methods for solving and applying first, second, and higher order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

WRK 3010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 160-hour bachelor's level, learning experience in a technical environment structured to allow students to further develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students must achieve 70% or better in all coursework and 70% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Select Three Electrical Engineering Technical Electives* From the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
CIS 2610
Visual BASIC
3

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages. Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates multiple concepts.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1110

CIS 4010
Advanced Computer Architecture
3

Continues the study of processor function and system design. Students will evaluate the performance of a given microprocessor using common benchmarks, analyze instruction sets in HLL, RISC, and CISC architectures, and expand their understanding of binary operations and related impact on ALU design. Students will research and compare performance and design factors in parallel, pipelined, and multiprocessor designs; analyze branch prediction impact on program design; and evaluate the effectiveness of hierarchical memory designs. Throughout this course students will engage in periodic research on various topics and will also complete an independent, comprehensive, in-depth analysis of an instructor-approved topic in high performance computer architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 3010, MTH 1410

EE 4210
Digital Logic Design
3

Continues the study of discrete-state logic, circuits, and systems. Reviews sequential logic design. Surveys digital building blocks: arithmetic circuits, counters, registers, logic arrays, and memory arrays. Covers computer architecture, programming, machine and assembly language, addressing modes, caches and virtual memory, and input/output. Computer tools are used to synthesize and test logic designs using FPGA's. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4210L

EE 4230
Digital Signal Processing
3

Presents filter designs for implementation on DSP hardware: infinite-impulse response and finite impulse response filters. Continues with non-linear processing such as peak detection, averaging, and two-dimensional processing.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4310

EE 4250
Embedded Software
3

Covers the development of embedded software using PC-hosted cross-development tools that target single-board computers, using assembly, C, and C#. Emphasizes topics relevant to the automotive industry including sensors and actuators, real-time constraints, motor control, and the CAN bus. Students use real automotive hardware.

EE 4350
Communication Systems and Circuits
3

Analyzes signals and noise, Fourier series and transforms, and random variables. Topics include analog and digital modulation techniques, coding systems, multiplexing, and detection. Introduces information theory. Examines system performance, design, and application.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4310

EE 4410
Opto-Electronics
3

Introduces fundamentals and principles of optoelectronic devices and systems. Covers light sources, photodetectors, photovoltaic cells, opto-electronic devices, and optical waveguides and fibers. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4410L

EE 4450
Laser Systems and Applications
3

Covers principles of lasers and laser characteristics. Analyzes different types of lasers: solid state, gas, semiconductor, and laser applications in manufacturing, medicine, science and technology, and defense and military. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4410

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4450L

EE 4710
Electronic Design Automation
3

Introduces electronic design automation (EDA) tools useful for making prototype boards in a product development setting. Covers circuit simulation, reliability analysis, thermal performance, electromagnetic compatibility, and high-speed digital layout. Emphasizes tools for schematic capture and printed circuit board layout. Students design and build their own prototype board.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130

EGR 4950
Engineering Research
3

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the Dean.

ME 3310
Thermodynamics
3

Covers classical thermodynamics. This course includes the properties of a pure substance; work, heat, energy, enthalpy, and entropy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; and power and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 3510, SCI 2510

ME 4870
Mechatronics
3

Introduces mechatronics, the integration of mechanical design, electronics, control systems, and computer science to create better products, systems, and processes. Topics include mechanisms, sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, dynamic system modeling, automation, robotics, and other applications. Experimental practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110, EE 3610 OR EE 2110, ME 4610

General Education Requirements

33 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

MTH 1510
Calculus I
4

Examines the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems. Antiderivatives, and the process of integration are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 OR MTH 1310

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 OR MTH 1110

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 OR MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton's laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Featured Alumni

If you have a Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering you will have a job for the rest of your life. And to know that what I do can potentially save a life is very moving and motivating. It makes me want to go to work.

- Conner Booth, BS Mechanical Engineering
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