Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
120 Hours

Mechanical Engineering Major

87 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
EE 2110
Circuits and Electronics I
4

Introduces the analysis of analog and digital circuits. Covers voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Introduces digital logic, logic gates, the MOSFET, and single-stage amplifiers. Emphasizes network theorems, node and mesh analysis, and nonlinear analysis. Covers sinusoidal excitation, phasors, steady-state AC analysis, and the operational amplifier (op-amp). Includes computer analysis and simulation. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
EGR 2710, SCI 2520

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 2110L

EE 3610
Dynamic Systems and Control
3

Introduces mathematical modeling of mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems in graphical and state equation form. This course includes time and frequency response of linear systems and linear feedback control.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120, MTH 3550

EGR 1010A
Engineering Graphics
2

Surveys the use of drafting instruments and computers to generate the necessary geometry for design, analysis, and manufacturing. Provides knowledge of geometric dimension and tolerance, industrial blueprint reading and the use of precision measurement tools through lecture and hands-on lab applications. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 1010L

EGR 1050
Introduction to Engineering and Design
2

Surveys the profession of engineering across several disciplines. Analysis and design problem-solving examples are used with hands-on activities. A design project introduces the engineering design process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 1050L

EGR 2710
Computing for Engineers
2

Introduces students to programs useful for solving engineering problems. Covers the design and implementation of algorithms and topics in computer programming: arrays, files, functions, pointers, and structured data types. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 2710L

EGR 3210
Engineering Economy I
2

Introduces the foundations of engineering economy. Students will develop an understanding and the ability to work problems that account for the time value of money, cash flow, and equivalence at different interest rates. The techniques are mastered from the basis of how an engineer in any discipline can take economic value into account in virtually any project environment. Eight factors commonly used in engineering economy computations are introduced and applied. One or more engineering alternatives are formulated to solve a problem or provide specified results. Different methods by which one or more alternatives can be evaluated economically using factors and formulas learned.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

EGR 4910
Engineering Project Management
3

Emphasizes estimating methods for bidding and scheduling jobs, project management strategies for planning and assigning work, and administrative procedures for tracking progress and changes in job requirements. Includes critical path scheduling, resource allocation, and client interfacing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350, EGR 3210 OR CQI 3210, EGR 3210 OR EE 3130, EGR 3210 OR EGR 3210, ME 3270, ME 3410

Corequisite(s):
CE 4220 OR EE 4510 OR ISE 3350 OR ME 4310

EGR 4920
Senior Design Project
2

Continues the topics an engineering project management while using concepts from civil engineering courses. Teams of students undertake a design project, build and document it, then demonstrate and present it to a group of peers. This is a capstone course in which students use everything learned throughout the program. 30 hours of contact time are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 4910

ELECTIVE
Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ELECTIVE
Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ELECTIVE
Mechanical Engineering Technical Elective*
3

ISE 2110
Manufacturing Processes
3

Studies the relationship between product engineering and manufacturing engineering. Casting processes, bulk deformation processes, sheet metal processes, mechanics of material removal processes, non-traditional machining, plastics and powder metallurgy, fastening and joining methods, design for manufacturing, and the factory of the future are covered. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ISE 2110L

ME 2110
Materials Science
4

Introduces the principles of engineering materials. This course covers the correlation of the internal structure and service conditions with the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of metals, polymers, and ceramics. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 2460

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2110L

ME 2210
Statics
3

Introduces the basic principles of mechanics with engineering applications. This course includes the concepts of vectors; moments and couples; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; free body diagrams; analysis of trusses, frames, machines, and beams; centroids and moments of inertia. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510, SCI 2510

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 2710, ME 2210L

ME 2250
Dynamics
3

Introduces students to the kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. This course includes energy and momentum principles. 45 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2250L

ME 2410
Introduction to 3D Modeling
3

Introduces students to 3D computer aided design modeling techniques using industry typical software. Builds on connection between 2D drawings/sketches and 3D solid modeling. Introduces concepts of projects, parts, libraries, catalogs, and other topics related to industry application of CAD programs.

ME 2450
Introduction to Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)
2

Introduces students to the application of computer technology to the engineering design process. Explores new design methodologies and techniques used throughout the design process from a product's conceptual design and simulation through manufacturing. Using 3D solid model software taught in class, students will learn the benefits of solid modeling as it relates to engineering design and the role it plays in the product development process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2450L

ME 3210
Solid Mechanics
3

Introduces students to the mechanics of deformable solids. This course includes the concepts of stress and strain; ductile and brittle material behaviors; and stress and strain constitutive laws. Axial, torsional, and bending deformations; and shear and moment diagrams in beams are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

ME 3220
Solid Mechanics and Vibrations Lab
1

Focuses on verification of basic mechanical properties of materials, beam deflections, stresses, strains, natural frequencies, and modes of vibrations through physical experiments using strain gauges, tensile testing machine, and finite element simulations with ANSYS software. 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

Corequisite(s):
ME 3210, ME 3250

ME 3250
Vibrations
3

Focuses on oscillatory motion including free vibration, harmonically excited vibration, transient vibration, two degree of freedom systems, properties of vibrating systems, and normal mode vibration of continuous systems.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, MTH 3550

ME 3270
Mechanical Design
4

Introduces students to machine design including materials and process considerations. Topics include load determination; stress, strain, and deflection; static, fatigue, and surface failure theories. A design project is required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, ME 3210

ME 3310
Thermodynamics
3

Covers classical thermodynamics. This course includes the properties of a pure substance; work, heat, energy, enthalpy, and entropy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; and power and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 3510, SCI 2510

ME 3410
Fluid Mechanics
3

Introduces students to the mechanics of fluids. This course includes fluid properties, kinematics, fluid statics, Bernoulli equation, control-volume and differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, and fluid/flow phenomena.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, MTH 3550

ME 4310
Heat Transfer
3

Covers the mechanisms of heat transfer including conduction, convection, and radiation. This course also includes the design, analysis, and selection of heat exchangers.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 4350

ME 4350
Thermal Systems Lab
1

Explores thermal and fluid systems experiments, designs and applications. Design topics may include heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, thermodynamic systems and heat exchangers. 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 4310

MTH 2510
Calculus II
4

Explores integration of functions, ordinary differential equations, series and sequences, and their application. Techniques of integration, improper integrals, convergence and divergence of various types of series and sequences, and applications related to area, volume, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar equations are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

MTH 3510
Multivariable Calculus
4

Examines functions of several variables, vector calculus, multiple integrals, and partial differentiation.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

MTH 3550
Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
4

Examines the algebra of matrices, vectors in space, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues, linear transformations, and the applications of matrix methods to find solutions to systems of linear equations and linear programming problems. Also examines the principles and methods for solving and applying first, second, and higher order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

WRK 3010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 160-hour bachelor's level, learning experience in a technical environment structured to allow students to further develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students must achieve 70% or better in all coursework and 70% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Select Three Mechanical Engineering Technical Electives* From the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
EE 4610
Robotics
3

Continues topics of computer control into robotic devices. Covers methods of robotic programming and robotic sensing. Discusses types and applications of robotic devices within industry and healthcare. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3250

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4610L

EGR 4950
Engineering Research
3

Presents junior and senior engineering students with an opportunity to investigate, in depth, an engineering topic of interest to them under the guidance of a faculty member. The chosen faculty member will work with the student to develop learning objectives for the course. These learning objectives will include writing a research paper summarizing results obtained, and presenting it to a local or national conference or in a campus-based symposium as arranged by the Dean.

ME 4410
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
3

Continues the study of fluid mechanics. This course includes the differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, surface resistance, flow in conduits, flow measurement, turbomachinery, and an introduction to computational fluid mechanics.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

ME 4710
Introduction to Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
3

Introduces students to finite element theory, problem formulation, and computer analysis. The concepts covered are isoparametric formulation, element stiffness and load matrices, global stiffness matrix, governing equations, boundary conditions, temperature effects, pre- and post-processing, scalar field, deformation and stress analysis, commercial FEA software, and application in 1D-, 2D-, and 3D-models.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3210, ME 3410, MTH 3550

ME 4730
Intermediate Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
3

Continues the development of the finite element method including a deep dive into applications. Element types and modeling techniques will be explored, followed by analysis types and convergence. Modeling assumptions will be discussed in terms of their effect on solution development and accuracy.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 4710

ME 4750
Kinematics
3

Studies motion without regard to the forces that cause motion. The principles of kinematics are studied and applied to machines to determine positions, displacements, velocities, and accelerations of their parts.

ME 4790
Biomechanics and Biomaterials
3

Introduces students to bioengineering related topics such as biomechanics, and biomaterials used in medical applications. Students will use the principles of kinematics and dynamics to analyze and interpret a variety of human body movements. Includes a survey of biomaterials including properties and specific medical applications.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250

ME 4850
Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) with Solidworks
3

Continues the topics in the project management course and uses concepts from mechanical engineering courses. Teams of students undertake a design project, build and document it, then demonstrate and present it to a group of peers. This is a capstone course where students work in teams. Students may not receive credit for the Mechanical Engineering project management and the Industrial and Systems Engineering project management courses.

ME 4870
Mechatronics
3

Introduces mechatronics, the integration of mechanical design, electronics, control systems, and computer science to create better products, systems, and processes. Topics include mechanisms, sensors, actuators, microcontrollers, dynamic system modeling, automation, robotics, and other applications. Experimental practices will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110, EE 3610 OR EE 2110, ME 4610

General Education Requirements

33 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

MTH 1510
Calculus I
4

Examines the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems. Antiderivatives, and the process of integration are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 OR MTH 1310

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 OR MTH 1110

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 OR MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton's laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Featured Alumni

If you have a Bachelor in Mechanical Engineering you will have a job for the rest of your life. And to know that what I do can potentially save a life is very moving and motivating. It makes me want to go to work.

- Conner Booth, BS Mechanical Engineering
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