Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
121 Hours

Major

97 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
HSC 1010
Introduction to Health Professions
2

Provides students with a foundation for college success, as well as the exploration of various health professions and tools for career planning. Emphasizes concepts of professionalism, health care ethics and confidentiality as well as an introduction to electronic health records (EHR) and relevant medical terminology.

HSC 1210
Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1211
Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1220
Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Focuses on the physiology of the body system on a cellular level and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1221
Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 2150
Pathophysiology
3

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

HSC 2710
Clinical Kinesiology
4

Covers the application of basic physics principles and advanced human anatomy as it pertains to the study of human movement. Emphasizes biomechanics, arthrokinematics, palpation, functional anatomy, and therapeutic principles. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2710L

HSC 3810
Neuroanatomy
3

Gives students a base of knowledge of the organizing principles of human neural structure and function. Upon completion of the course, students should have a good foundation for future clinical or other advanced courses in neuroscience.

HSC 4210
Ethics for Health Professionals
3

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

OCC 1010
Foundations of Occupational Therapy
2

Introduces students to the concepts of the profession including the Practice Framework and the threads of the curriculum (client-centered, occupation-based intervention, and professional ethics). The various levels of the profession are explained as well as the credentialing process. The application for the program is distributed in this course and it is a prerequisite for acceptance. This is the first course in occupational therapy offered in the curriculum and is therefore a foundation course. Must complete with a B- or better.

OCC 2220
Therapeutic Use of Occupations
5

Provides students with an understanding of activities and their historical implications in the practice of occupational therapy. Activity analysis will be explored in detail. Analysis opportunities will occur in areas like activities of daily living/self-care and leisure skills. Crafts and the use of mediums will be presented to assist students with understanding the importance of being able to teach life tasks. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 2220L

OCC 2330
Occupational Centered Theory
5

Focuses on the application of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework through advanced task analysis and adaptation. Students are instructed in current theories and frames of reference utilized in occupational therapy practice. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 2330L

OCC 2550
Assessment of Occupational Engagement
3

Introduces the concepts of occupational therapy assessment. This course includes a discussion of the processes involved for choosing assessment tools and types of assessments; the relation of the assessment process to the performance areas of self-care, work, play, and leisure skill areas; and a discussion of the assessment of physical function including range of motion and manual muscle testing, sensory, neuromotor, cognitive and psychosocial performance components. An overview of the physiologic dimensions of activity and assessment is provided. Students are required to use hands-on experience in using assessment in a simulated test situation. Recent literature on assessment is reviewed. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2220

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 2550L

OCC 3020
Mental Health Conditions and Occupational Dysfunction
3

Outlines conditions and disorders including etiology and clinical progression from adulthood to late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3060
Complementary Therapies, Wellness and Occupation
3

Focuses on the basic concepts, evolution, utilization, and legislative issues surrounding wellness, complementary, and integrative therapies used in treatment. Students will experience the use of complementary/integrative therapies to enhance personal wellness and clinical skills. Must complete with a B- or better.

OCC 3130
Professional Roles, Responsibilities and Practice Areas
3

Introduces the organization, administrative structure, and functions of occupational therapy service programs. Emphasis is on communication techniques, differentiating the levels of functions of staff and legal implications of service delivery. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 3130L

OCC 3140
Documentation in the Healthcare System
3

Provides students, in a laboratory-based setting, with a hands-on opportunity to develop documentation skills centered around a problem-based format. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

OCC 3210
Level I Fieldwork (Children)
2

Provides field observation of children of varying ages and needs. Students have the opportunity to observe and consider the implication a disability has on development. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie the observations to the occupational therapy process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3310
Child Development and the Implications of Pathology/ Conditions
3

Examines child development from birth through 18. This course covers reflexes and motor and sensory development through age 5 in detail. Pathology/conditions and their implications to development are discussed thoroughly. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3410
Disease/Injury and Occupational Dysfunction
3

Studies disease/injuries, including etiology and clinical progression from young through late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 3140

OCC 3510
The Aging Process and the Implications of Pathology/ Conditions
3

Completes the study of normal development and performance through adulthood and the older adult. Introduces specific diseases/conditions commonly experienced by the older adult. Current concepts addressing prevention and community resources are explored. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 4020
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies I
5

Emphasizes application of theory to practice with an adult population. Intervention strategies to assist people with regaining performance are covered. Consideration is also given to conditions seen frequently in practice settings. This course requires students to prioritize needs and demonstrate proficiency with common modalities. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4020L

OCC 4030
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies II
5

Emphasizes assessment, treatment planning, and development of intervention strategies with the older adult. Strategies designed to enhance/retain performance with emphasis on quality of life are presented. Performance areas including activities of daily living, work, and play or leisure are analyzed as applied to this population. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 4020

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4030L

OCC 4220
Occupational Therapy and Case Management
4

Students will investigate services that assist people in regaining performance/independence. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie community services to the occupational therapy process. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 4350
Personal and Environmental Adaptations
5

Includes designing and restructuring the physical environment to assist self-care, work, play, and leisure performance. Emphasis is on architectural barriers and utilization of wheelchairs and other equipment. Includes in-depth study of assistive technology, principles of wellness, ergonomics, work hardening, work site, and job analysis. 75 hours of lecture and 150 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4350L

OCC 4550
Community-Based Occupational Therapy
5

Focuses on the student's ability to understand and appreciate the role of occupational therapy in home and community settings utilizing evidence-based practice and current models of service delivery. This course explores a variety of roles for the occupational therapist in community-based settings. Students will learn to apply the philosophical roots of occupational therapy to contemporary practice. In addition, students will gain an overview of funding sources, governmental policies, and documentation needs relevant to community-based practice. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4550L

WRI 3010
Report Writing
3

Addresses the ability to write professionally and ethically for business and technical purposes relevant to a student's major field or career aspirations. Emphasis is on learning and applying rhetorical principles for writing formal reports including researching published technical information. Less formal aspects of business and technical communication are also studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

General Education

24 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Select 1 Course from the Following: Global/Cultural Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

HUM 1010
Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)
3

Enhances the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

HUM 1020
Art and Architecture II (Renaissance to Modern)
3

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Renaissance period to the present are studied.

HUM 3610
Art Appreciation
3

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

HUM 3650
Music Appreciation
3

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

POL 3110
International Relations
3

Includes the study of the evolution of the modern international system, International Relations theories, state sovereignty and state power, foreign policy analysis, contemporary conflict and conflict resolution, global terrorism, global economic governance, poverty aid and development globalization, human rights and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 1020
Spanish II
3

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed the introductory/previous course. This course continues to develop the student's ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 1010

Select 1 Course from the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
PSY 1010
Human Relations
3

Provides a psychological foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional settings. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective strategies to improve human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

PSY 1110
General Psychology
3

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

PSY 2110
Psychology of Death and Dying
3

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theories related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 2210
Developmental Psychology
3

Examines changes that occur across the human lifespan, from conception to end of life. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3350
Human Sexuality
3

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and awareness of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 3510
Adolescent Psychology
3

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. The emphasis is on establishing skills necessary to work with this group. Areas of focus include physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents. Research findings on issues and disorders common to adolescents are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 4010
Social Psychology
3

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

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