Total Hours Needed to Graduate:
120 Hours

Major

90 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
CIS 1010
Introduction to Computer Applications
3

Introduces students to modern office software and applications. Applications presented include word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software.

CIS 2210
Database Management and Design
3

Introduces students to the underlying principles of information and database structure in electronic database management systems. Students will be introduced to types of information, table structure, features of a relational database, basic concepts of database design and normalization, and basic overviews of the roles of database administrators and professionals. Students will also be introduced to introductory SQL commands using a command line and existing databases. Expands on the concepts learned in the introductory course in database creation by introducing students to higher levels of database development and computer science concepts. Students learn SQL in order to study the manipulation of a relational database. This course also includes a survey of database platforms.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1110 or CS 1010 or CS 1110 or NET 1010

CIS 2510
Systems Development Methods
3

Presents traditional methodologies of system analysis, design, and implementation along with recent developments in the field providing a total approach to information systems development. This course focuses on how to develop information systems in an engineered, disciplined manner utilizing real-world situations and applications.

CIS 2610
Visual BASIC
3

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages. Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates multiple concepts.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1110

CS 1010
Principles of Computer Science
3

Provides students an overview of the computer science profession. The course will focus on topics such as history, careers, programming languages, operating systems, databases, and relationship of mathematical concepts.

CS 1110
Introduction to Programming
3

Introduces students to programming concepts such as logic and flow charting as well as some basic programming techniques.

CS 2150
C++ Programming
3

Introduces program design and development in the C++ language. Uses Microsoft Visual C++ to provide students with experience using visual development tools. Students will demonstrate the ability to use C++ to design solutions to problems, modify existing C++ programs, and develop complex object-oriented applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1110, MTH 1110

CS 2410
Java Programming
3

Introduces students to using the JAVA programming language for developing applications. This is the first of two JAVA programming courses. The use of JAVA in Web-based client and server programming is also covered.

CS 2420
Advanced Java Programming
3

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2410

CS 3010
Game Design and Analysis
3

Introduces students to storyboarding, game layout, and game design. Students will create scripts and storyboards for existing games and games of their own design.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

CS 3110
C# Programming
3

Introduces students to program design and development using C#. Students will recognize and interpret basic concepts, types, variables, conversions, expressions, statements, namespaces, structs, arrays, interfaces and attributes of C# programming language.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2150

CS 3210
Data Structures and Algorithms I
3

Introduces concepts and techniques for the implementation of data structures and the design and analysis of computer algorithms. Topics include abstract data types and algorithm development using C++.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2150, MTH 1410

CS 3220
Data Structures and Algorithms II
3

Expands on the concepts begun in Data Structures and Algorithms I, including stacks, queues, trees, and binary trees as fundamental conceptual structures of data. Various physical implementations for each conceptual view are examined with emphasis on the concept of abstract data types. Algorithm development continues with coverage of methods solving recurrences, divide-and-conquer algorithms, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, and graph algorithms.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3210

CS 3310
Application Security Practices
3

Provides students with the ability to recognize, design, and build software security into project development. Strategies and methods of preventing attacks and mitigating exploits, focusing on threat modeling analysis and best security practices will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3110

CS 3410
Programming for Mobile Devices
3

Provides students with opportunities and the experience of developing applications for various mobile devices (i.e. phones, tablets, other multi-media mobile devices).

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2310, CS 2410 or CS 2310, CS 3110

CS 3510
Introduction to Android Mobile SDK and Application Development
3

Focuses on mastering the Android SDK tools in relation to each platform being discussed, specific to application development. Engineering tools are reviewed as well as Java application.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3410

CS 3520
Advanced Android Mobile Application Development
3

Focuses on engineering mobile applications within the Android environment utilizing various SDK's and available tools. This course is a continuation of the Introduction course.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3510

CS 3810
Unreal Game Programming I
3

Introduces students to game programming using game development engine software. Processes of game development, game assets, and introduction to UNREAL development application, binary space portioning, terrain generation, volume development, and lighting are implemented.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4320

CS 3820
Unreal Game Programming II
3

Continues the use of game development engine UNREAL software for programming games. Topics covered will include particle effects, working with the Karma Physics engine, Bot development and AI navigation, and creating scripted sequences.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3810

CS 3850
Game Development
3

Continues the use of the Flash programming language for developing games and graphical animations. It draws heavily upon the concepts and terminology of object-oriented programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3110

CS 4110
Artificial Intelligence
3

Examines how artificial intelligence on computers can be made to behave intelligently. This course will cover theoretical and practical approaches to AI, with topics to include search, logic, knowledge representation, uncertainty, and different aspects of the performance of AI techniques. No previous exposure to AI is assumed.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3110 OR CS 3850

CS 4310
Unity Game Programming I
3

Introduces students to game programming using game development engine software. Processes of game development, game assets, and introduction to Unity development application, binary space portioning, terrain generation, volume development, and lighting are implemented.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3850

CS 4320
Unity Game Programming II
3

Continues the use of game development engine software for programming games. Topics covered will include particle effects, working with the Karma Physics engine, Bot development and AI navigation, and creating scripted sequences.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4310

CS 4990
Senior Design Project in Game Software Development
3

Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of game design. At the end of this course students will have designed and programmed a complete game that highlights acquired skills for prospective employers.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4320

MTH 1210
Trigonometry
3

Analyzes trigonometric functions, their properties, solution of right and oblique triangles, radian measure, graphs, vectors, trigonometric equations, and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120

MTH 1410
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
3

Focuses on the applications of discrete mathematics in computer science. This course includes set theory, propositional logic, relations, Boolean algebra, and minimization of equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310 or MTH 1210

PPM 3010
Project Management
3

Introduces students to the five processes of project management: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Topics include an overview of the evolution of project management, tools and techniques, and the project life cycle. Students will gain experience with the basic techniques of project planning, scheduling, execution, and closure.

WEB 1110
Introduction to HTML
3

Introduces concepts in website development using Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) and other components such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Javascript. Topics will include: evolution of web development, website design concepts, standard HTML techniques, and trends in the field of web Development.

WRKIT2010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 150-hour minimum learning experience over a minimum of 10 week in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. A minimum grade of 73% is required on the supervisor evaluation and assignments to pass the course.

WRKIT4010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 150-hour minimum learning experience over a minimum of 10 week in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. A minimum grade of 73% is required on the supervisor evaluation and assignments to pass the course.

General Education

30 Hours
COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 2410
Creative Writing
3

Introduces the fundamentals of writing for expressive purposes to students at any level of experience in creative writing. Students will produce and revise original works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction using a workshop format. Students will also explore mentor texts in order to analyze various structures, stylistic approaches, and techniques that they will apply to their own works.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

Select 1 Course from the Following: Science Elective

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
HSC 1110
Introduction to Healthcare
3

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

HSC 1210
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1211

HSC 1220
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Focuses on the physiology of the body system on a cellular level and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1221

HSC 1250
Introduction to Disease
3

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

HSC 2150
Pathophysiology
3

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

HSC 2210
Nutrition
3

Teaches students how the logic of science is applied to basic nutrition concerns, including food groups and recommended nutritional guidelines.

HSC 2310
Biochemistry
3

Provides an overview of biochemical structures and reactions that occur in living systems. Emphasis is placed on the areas of energy, proteins, and catalysis as well as metabolism and molecular genetics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

HSC 2410
Microbiology
3

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A laboratory may be taken concurrently with the lecture course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2411

HSC 3110
Health Law and Regulations
3

Addresses legal issues, restraints, and problems arising from organization and delivery of healthcare services. Topics to be included are: tort law; hospital, physician, nurse, and other health professional's liability; informed consent; medical records; legal reporting obligations; abortion; autopsy, donation and experimentation; sterilization and artificial insemination; euthanasia; patient rights and responsibilities; labor relation; insurance; trial procedures; and restraint of trade are topics which are included.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 3150
Planning and Evaluation of Health Services
3

Researches and examines the steps to planning, implementation, and evaluation of health services. Includes the development of measurable objectives and the compilation and presentation of a report.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

HSC 4010
Healthcare Administration
3

Studies the basic principles of healthcare administration including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The emphasis will be on administration of hospitals, organizational structure, trustee responsibility, medical staff relationships, third-party payors, and fiscal management.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4110
Seminar in Health Issues
3

Studies current healthcare issues such as managed care, health insurance, foreign healthcare systems, and the policies of healthcare. Individual or group projects will be a component of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 4010, HSC 4210, HSC 4310, HSC 3150

HSC 4210
Ethics for Health Professionals
3

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

HSC 4310
Health System Finance
3

Examines basic accounting principles and finance in healthcare settings. Considerations in budgetary preparation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

SCI 2150
Integrated Physics
3

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110, MTH 1120, MTH 1210

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1060 or MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton’s laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510, SCI 2510L

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

SCI 3210
Principles of Astronomy
3

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

SCI 4510
Environmental Science
3

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

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