baker.eduUndergraduate StudiesGraduate StudiesBaker Online

Improve the harvest.

Grow a strong future.

Farmers who once planted their crops by the dark of the moon have been replaced by Agricultural Technologists driving harvesters guided by satellite-based global positioning systems. Similar advances in soil science and irrigation systems have made today’s farm every bit as sophisticated as any factory or hospital. It’s challenging work, and requires sound reasoning and judgment and good mechanical skills.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

An Introduction to Your Life at Baker College

The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

Getting Started

There’s a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

I came to Baker because the faculty was great!

Kari Shier

Agriculture Technology

Improve the harvest.

Grow a strong future.

Farmers who once planted their crops by the dark of the moon have been replaced by Agricultural Technologists driving harvesters guided by satellite-based global positioning systems. Similar advances in soil science and irrigation systems have made today’s farm every bit as sophisticated as any factory or hospital. It’s challenging work, and requires sound reasoning and judgment and good mechanical skills.

Career Facts

$54,140

Median salary for Agricultural Supervisors

$68,050

Average salary for Agricultural Managers

View citations

Overview

Overview

Baker’s Agriculture Technology program provides you with advanced training to compete in today’s technology-driven farming industry.

Through classwork, hands-on lab training, and the real-world experience of an internship, you study the latest in agricultural equipment, tools, and technologies along with agribusiness, plant science, viticulture, sustainable agriculture, and more. You can choose to increase your knowledge in agribusiness, animal science, or in farming technology.

When you complete the program, you’ll be prepared to apply your knowledge, and skills to select, install, and maintain modern agricultural technologies.

Course Information

Course Information

Agriculture Technology Major72 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

AG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the agricultural industry, including current trends in technology; plant, soil, weed and insect science; global and local agribusiness markets; conservation and sustainable agriculture trends. This course sets the stage for all subsequent classes.

Introduction to Agricultural Industry 4

AG 111

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the business operations of independent farms. Coursework will cover financial fundamentals relative to tracking liquidity and solvency of farm operations. Students also will learn about farm finance and how to calculate both short-term and long-term profit/loss in agricultural businesses.

Corequisite(s):
AG 101.
Agribusiness I 4

AG 112

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the economics of the agriculture business, from the impact of weather and climate to the study of farm futures, agriculture markets in both local and global economies, and the fundamentals of agriculture debt management in both small and large agribusinesses. Also covered will be food marketing and how associated consumer demands impact agribusiness.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 111
AG 101
Agribusiness II 4

AG 113

4 Quarter Hours

Delves into the role of government in agriculture. Included will be examination of government regulatory and financial services agencies and the development of farm policies and bills at all levels of government — federal, state, and local. The course also will review the role public farm policy and funding has on the development of sustainable regional and local food systems.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 112
Agribusiness III 4

AG 121

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the services, networking, and assistance available to all areas of the agriculture industry. Special topics include co-ops, crop consulting, seed companies, and other services. Exposes students to the highly interactive environment between industry and consumer in the agriculture market.

Partners in Agriculture 4

AG 131

4 Quarter Hours

Studies the relationships of soils to plant health and growth, land use, conservation, and environmental quality. The course will include laboratory work in soil description, analysis, and assessment.

Soil Science 4

AG 141

4 Quarter Hours

Covers the science of plant life and how this science relates to agronomy, which is the science of soil management and crop production. Students will develop basic knowledge of the fundamental structures and processes of plants including physiology, heredity, and environmental influences on plants. Also covered will be the science and social and economic impacts of genetic plant modifications and other advanced plant engineering practices.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 131.
Plant Science and Agronomy 4

AG 151

4 Quarter Hours

Reviews the science of pest and disease management in agriculture. Focus will include definition of common diseases and pests and learning the essential science of conventional chemical and pesticide applications and the necessary certifications required in these areas. Also explored will be alternative and organic sciences and technologies for weed and insect management.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 141
Weed Disease and Insect Management 4

AG 161

5 Quarter Hours

Explores the impacts of technology on agriculture, including industry-specific software packages and common software systems used in the agriculture field. Provides a basic understanding of the operation and use of computers for farm business management. Stresses the practical applications of word processing, spreadsheets, and database management systems to agricultural production and financial management decisions. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required for this course.

Computers in Agriculture 5

AG 181

2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an opportunity to observe agricultural careers, spanning a wide variety of applications in Michigan from operating high-technology auto-steer tractors and GPS systems to managing large dairy farms or growing and distributing produce and fruit in an increasingly vibrant and entrepreneurial local food system. Students will select areas of interest for introductory hands-on summer internship experiences on farms throughout Michigan.

Introduction to Agricultural Systems Internship 2

AG 201

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of sustainable agriculture which involves development of food systems, renewable energy technologies, and financially viable business practices to maintain, sustain, and preserve the environment and the earth’s resources. The course will examine trends in the sustainable and organic food industries, environmentally sustainable farming practices, local and regional food systems, and the development of alternative and renewable energies such as biofuels, anaerobic digestion systems, and wind farms in agricultural settings.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113
Principles of Sustainable Agriculture 4

AG 241

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a detailed overview of the cultivation of grapes, the role climate plays on fruit crops in the Great lakes region, the history and production of both wine and fruit including cherries and other consumer crops and the science and technology of orchard and vineyard cultivation, pruning, harvesting, distilling, and distribution. Fruit and wine production represent a vibrant and growing portion of Michigan’s economy. In addition to evaluating the economic and financial impacts of this industry.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 141
Viticulture and the Fruit Industry 4

AG 291

4 Quarter Hours

Explores current and future trends in agriculture with the concerns and critical issues impacting the field. Contemporary agricultural issues will also be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 201, AG 221
Corequisite(s):
WRK 277
Agriculture Capstone and Future Trends 4

WRK 277

4 Quarter Hours

Consists of a 120-hour minimum paid/unpaid, hands-on experience, working in the agriculture industry.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
minimum GPA 2.00.
Agriculture Work Experience 4

WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
General Education Requirements28 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4

ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4

INF 112

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Word Processing 2

INF 113

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Electronic Spreadsheets 2

MTH 108

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application 4

SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4

WRI 115

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student’s individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4

PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
Agribusiness Group Requirements16 Hours

Total quarter hours required for graduation with Agribusiness – 100

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

ECN 201

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics 4

MGT 141

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an understanding of leadership styles, the management process, organizational resources and how to use them, various motivation/behavior theories, conflict management, and implementing and supporting change. Students will compare different leadership styles and apply them in case scenarios, role plays and other group/team activities involving topics such as: change, employee behavior, conflict, ethics, decision-making, and managing resources.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101, MGT 101
Principles of Management 4

MKT 111B

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the essentials of an introductory course than can be either a survey course or a prerequisite to more advanced marketing studies. Study includes product identification, positioning and pricing strategies, consumer need identification and making the connection between consumer needs and product advertising, basic distribution strategies, and some of the decision-making tools at the disposal of the marketing manager. This course is recommended as a first course for marketing majors.

Principles of Marketing 4

MKT 131

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the steps of the selling process from beginning to end, with a focus on organization and a systematic approach. Topics include communication, the strategic selling process, sales careers, understanding your customer, and using technology.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
MGT 101, MKT 111B.
Personal Selling 4
Agriculture Technology Group Requirements17 Hours

Total quarter hours required for graduation with Agriculture Technology – 101

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

AG 221

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the maintenance of gas and diesel engines, field machinery, tractor and power units, and shop equipment to include the fundamentals of gas and arc welding. Students will be exposed to the common implements and equipment used in the agriculture industry. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113, MTH 108
Agriculture Equipment and Tooling 4

AG 231A

4 Quarter Hours

Exposes students to the application of GPS systems in the agricultural environment.  The course includes both new and retrofit installations of GPS equipment onto agricultural equipment.  Concepts covered include GPS mapping, software loading, auto-steering systems, and precision agriculture.

Introduction to Precision Agriculture 4

AG 232A

4 Quarter Hours

Explores methods for incorporating field research data in a GIS project. GPS applications in natural-resource inventories, ecological studies, and atmospheric and hydrologic process studies are discussed.  Methods in using precision agriculture to improve agriculture processes are the focus of this class. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 116
AG 231
Advanced Precision Agriculture 4

DSL 116

5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the introduction to auto/diesel electrical/electronic systems which includes basic theories, electrical/electronic components, wiring and circuit diagrams, circuit protection, switches, relays solenoids and battery fundamentals. This course also focuses on the use of test equipment such as digital multimeters, test lights, jumper wires and logic probes used to diagnose basic electrical/electronic faults. 20 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C (73%) or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Corequisite(s):
DSL 106.
Introduction to Diesel Electrical 5
Animal Science Group Requirements18 Hours

Total quarter hours required for graduation with Animal Science – 102

Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

AG 221

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the maintenance of gas and diesel engines, field machinery, tractor and power units, and shop equipment to include the fundamentals of gas and arc welding. Students will be exposed to the common implements and equipment used in the agriculture industry. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 113, MTH 108
Agriculture Equipment and Tooling 4

AG 251

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to the genetics, nutrition, and management of dairy, beef, and other livestock raised in Michigan. Coursework will include learning about the management of animals based on behavioral science and healthcare management systems. Also explored will be the science and contrasting economics of confined large-scale farm operations producing for worldwide markets and small farms utilizing rotational grazing and other management practices geared toward producing for local food systems.

Animal Science 4

AG 256

5 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the veterinary technology profession, providing a broad overview of regulatory and ethical issues, handling and restraint of animals, sanitation, breed identification, and laboratory issues. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required for this course.

Corequisite(s):
AG 251.
Veterinary Science 5

AG 261

5 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the science of large and small animal husbandry, caring for animals from breeding through gestation and into production. Students will acquire the essential knowledge required to manage animal reproduction and lactation and overall herd health and management. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
AG 256
AG 251
Animal Husbandry 5
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 101
Program Description

Program Description

The Baker College agriculture technology program provides students with the advanced training necessary to compete in today’s technology-driven farming industry. Students completing the program will have acquired knowledge and skills in agribusiness, weed and insect management, plant science and agronomy, sustainable agriculture, viticulture, agriculture equipment and tools, and the use of agricultural computer and technology systems. Additionally, students may select an agribusiness path and focus on marketing and management, an animal science path and learn about animal husbandry and veterinary science, or select a technology path and develop skills to select, install, and maintain agricultural technology equipment including global positioning systems (GPS), auto steering systems, and soil sampling and mapping systems.

Accreditation

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Locations

Locations

The Agriculture Technology program is available at the following campuses:

Cadillac
Owosso

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

My professors actually work in the field and have hands-on experience with photonics and lasers.

Dennis LaPort
Photonics Story