baker.eduUndergraduate StudiesGraduate StudiesBaker Online

Bring your ability.

Help shape the future of Web design.

Web developers are computer programmers who develop and maintain websites for public and private organizations. By applying logic and analysis, they work with the Web design team to determine how a site will function, what it will look like, and how it will be used. Then, they write, develop, and debug the code for the site, using advanced programming languages.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

An Introduction to Your Life at Baker College

The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

Getting Started

There’s a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
Apply Online

Testimonial quote

I can honestly tell you that I would much rather have a Baker graduate….they have exceeded my expectations.

Amy Ensign
Major Southeast Michigan Hospital

Web Development

Bring your ability.

Help shape the future of Web design.

Web developers are computer programmers who develop and maintain websites for public and private organizations. By applying logic and analysis, they work with the Web design team to determine how a site will function, what it will look like, and how it will be used. Then, they write, develop, and debug the code for the site, using advanced programming languages.

Career Facts

$63,490

Median salary for Web Developers

27%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$77,550

Median salary for Computer Programmers

View citations

Overview

Overview

Through the Web Development program at Baker, you develop the business and technical skills you need to design, develop, implement, and maintain websites for public and private organizations.

Our bachelor degree program works in conjunction with our Associate of Applied Science degree in Web development to further develop your technical expertise. In addition to learning design, development, and programming fundamentals, you develop the skills needed to create interactive, database-driven websites.

Upon graduation, you’ll be fully prepared to begin your career in web development, without additional training.

Course Information

Course Information

Web Development Major127 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

CIS 114

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the underlying principles of information and database structure in electronic database management systems. Students will be introduced to types of information, table structure, features of a relational database, basic concepts of database design and normalization, and basic overviews of the roles of database administrators and professionals. Students will also be introduced to introductory SQL commands using a command line and existing databases.

Database Fundamentals 2

CIS 251

4 Quarter Hours

Presents traditional methodologies of system analysis, design, and implementation along with recent developments in the field providing a total approach to information systems development. This course focuses on how to develop information systems in an engineered, disciplined manner utilizing real-world situations and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
One level of a programming language or Junior status.
Systems Development Methods 4

CIS 310

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111
Visual BASIC 4

CIS 311

4 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates concepts learned in CIS310 and CIS311.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 310
Advanced Visual BASIC 4

CIS 331

4 Quarter Hours

Expands on the concepts learned in the introductory course in database creation by introducing students to higher levels of database development and computer science concepts. Students learn SQL in order to study the manipulation of a relational database. This course also includes a survey of database platforms.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 114 or CS 101 or INF 114A or NET 101.
Database Management Using SQL 4

CIS 351

4 Quarter Hours

Helps students gain the knowledge and skills required to design databases and information systems for the Web. Includes the development of data models including how to organize the modeling task, manage compromises, design for flexibility, achieve basic and advanced normalization, and develop and use generic models. Explains how to model a problem domain by abstracting objects, attributes, and relationships. Describes object-oriented approaches to model the dynamic behavior of a system in terms of state and process models. Students will construct data and object models using Entity-Relationship (ER), Unified Modeling Language (UML), and other techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A or CIS 331.
System Modeling and Design 4

CIS 421B

4 Quarter Hours

Exposes students to database administration and the duties of a database administrator (DBA) to include database monitoring, backup and recovery, troubleshooting, and tuning for reliability and performance. Students will install, configure, and maintain an RDBMS including security, backup and recovery operations, and performance tuning.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 302A or CIS 331.
Database Administration I 4

CS 111

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to programming concepts such as logic and flow charting as well as some basic programming techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
Any INF course or CS 101 or EGR 111 or NET 101, MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Introduction to Programming 4

CS 241

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to using the JAVA programming language for developing applications. This is the first of two JAVA programming courses. The use of JAVA in Web-based client and server programming is also covered.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111 or one level of a programming language.
Java Programming 4

CS 242

4 Quarter Hours

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 241
Advanced Java Programming 4

CS 422A

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students the ability to create and maintain database objects to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. In addition, students will write queries to retrieve, summarize, and modify data using joins and subqueries. Students will learn how to create and execute stored procedures and functions. This course also introduces participants to database triggers.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 331, CS 111
Database Programming I 4

CS 461

4 Quarter Hours

Covers the three areas of computer security: network security, system security, and application security. Students will demonstrate the ability to develop user administration tools to tighten security in an open systems environment.

Prerequisite(s):
LUX 261 or WEB 361.
Security 4

DMD 131

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to raster-based editing software used to produce graphics for the web and print. Topics include basic image adjustment and retouching techniques as well as methods for manipulating, repairing, and combining images.

Prerequisite(s):
Any of the INF courses.
Introduction to Graphic Imaging 4

ITS 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a background in information security, security management, and the technical components of security. Students will be given an overview of the entire field of information security: the history, the terminology, and the management aspects of information security programs with sufficient detail to facilitate an understanding of information security systems and their management.

Introduction to Information System Security 4

LUX 205

4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to Linux/Unix, its history, characteristics, and system basics from a user’s perspective. The following concepts are introduced: basic file structures; navigational tools; file manipulation tools; file permissions and access; ‘vi’ editor basics; remote terminal emulation; mail; shell fundamentals; quoting and special characters; filename generation; input/output redirection; pipelines; multitasking and input arguments. Students will demonstrate the ability to use Linux/Unix commands at the command-line level.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency. INF 111 or INF 131 or INF 121 or INF 161 or NET 101.
Introduction to Linux/Unix 4

WEB 111B

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces concepts in website development using Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) and other components such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Javascript. Topics will include: evolution of web development, website design concepts, standard HTML techniques, and trends in the field of web Development.

Introduction to HTML 4

WEB 121A

4 Quarter Hours

Instructs students in the creation of a website and in the use of web page development tools. Students apply their skills in the creation of web pages using text, graphics, tables, and frames. This course will enable students to create their own web pages and websites for publishing information on the Internet. Emphasis on effective design and layout of web pages and sites is provided.

Prerequisite(s):
Any INF course or WEB 111B.
World Wide Web Design 4

WEB 131

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation in website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare web-based solutions through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current methodology including CSS and HTML5.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 111B.
Web Development I 4

WEB 132

4 Quarter Hours

Provides professional level website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare professional level web-based solutions for multiple Internet capable devices through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current enhanced methodology including JavaScript and jQuery.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 131
Web Development II 4

WEB 201

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to web-development tools for animation. Enables students to produce websites with interactive objects, graphics, and animation.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 111B.
Web Multi-Media 4

WEB 211

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the skills in utilizing Java-script and HTML. Enables students to integrate Java-script and HTML to create interactive websites that include pop-up windows, pop-up menus, and image rollovers. This course includes working with forms, images, frames, windows and cookies.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 111
WEB 111B, CS 111
Web Scripting 4

WEB 221

4 Quarter Hours

Enables students to work with CGI/scripts for creating interactive web applications. Students will install and modify scripts as part of site development projects. The course also includes web-database integration.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 211
Interactive Web Design 4

WEB 222

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with exposure to how websites are used by businesses. Students will develop retail storefronts, marketing and customer service sites, intranets, and extranets to apply the technical learning from the previous classes and to understand how businesses can use these tools. At the end of this course, students will be able to effectively plan how a website fits a company’s strategy and will have developed a portfolio of website designs.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 221
Internet Commerce 4

WEB 241

4 Quarter Hours

Provides experienced Flash designers with the knowledge and hands-on practice they need to create event-driven animation and interactive web elements. Introduction of core ActionScript concepts is also included.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 201
ActionScript Programming 4

WEB 321

4 Quarter Hours

Instructs students in the use of Individual Development Environments (IDE) to develop web applications. Students will use development tools to create interfaces to databases.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 351, WEB 121A
Web Application Development Tools 4

WEB 331

4 Quarter Hours

Expands on development of web applications by introducing J2EE technologies including JavaServer Pages (JSP), Servlets, Enterprise Java Beans (EJB), Java Message Service (JMS) API, and other ancillary technologies like JDBC and JNDI. Students will use these technologies to create interactive, database-driven web applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 242
Java Enterprise Edition 4

WEB 361

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the opportunity to administer a web server. Issues such as selecting server hardware and software will be reviewed. Also, students will learn how to control access to websites, setup e-mail aliases and related services. Students will gain experience in working with and analyzing site statistics. The procedures for the online marketing of websites will also be covered. This course will prepare students to establish and manage a web server.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the BCS, BTS or BWD program.
Web Server Administration 4

WEB 411

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the understanding of usability design and examines usability issues such as architecture, navigation, graphical presentation, and page structure. Explains the steps relevant to incorporating usability into every stage of the web development process, from requirements to tasks analysis, prototyping and mockups, to user testing, revision, and post launch evaluations. Students will demonstrate these skills in the design and redesign of their own projects.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 222
Web Usability Design 4

WEB 421

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses the design, use, and development of web portals. An enterprise portal is a single web location from which many services and communicative systems are accessed. Students will work with web portal technologies to design and implement a web portal.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 331, WEB 361, WEB 411
Web Portals 4

WEB 431

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a capstone class that focuses on using knowledge gained in previous classes to create an enterprise web application.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 421
Enterprise Web Applications 4

WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

WEB 231

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamentals of using alternative server-side technology such as PHP to produce interactive websites, site development, and database integration.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 221
Server-Side Programming 4

WEB 322

4 Quarter Hours

Covers the use of programming languages such as Perl, PHP, and Python to interface databases to create interactive web applications. Students will create interfaces to relational databases such as Oracle and MySOL.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 321
Web Application Development Programming 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

WRK 218

4 Quarter Hours

Provides twelve-weeks of intensive career research for Online campus students, who cannot obtain an internship, the opportunity to conduct intensive career research based on their major and career goals. Students will complete multiple career related research assignments, including two informational interviews. Eligible students must complete a minimum of 48 credit hours and 75 percent of major core requirements prior to requesting enrollment in this course. Enrollment is allowed by permission from the Online Career Services (OCS) staff. Contact the OCS staff at careerserv-ol@baker.edu for more details.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
minimum GPA 2.00.
Work Experience Project 4

WRKTC 201

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a 120-hour minimum learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102 (Associate Degrees), 108 Credit Hours in CYBER DEFENSE MAJOR, 48 Credit Hours in GENERAL EDUCATION REQUIREMENTS, minimum GPA 2.00.
Work Experience 4
General Education Requirements66 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

ELECT 111A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Scientific Inquiry Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Scientific Inquiry Elective 4

ELECT 121A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective 4

ELECT 121B

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Communication Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Communication Elective 4

ELECT 131A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective 4

ELECT 131B

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective 4

ELECT 141A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Personal and Social Environments Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Personal and Social Environments Elective 4

ELECT 141B

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Personal and Social Environments Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Personal and Social Environments Elective 4

ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4

ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4

HUM 401A

4 Quarter Hours

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Philosophy of Ethics 4

INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2

MTH 111

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra 4

MTH 112A

4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
College Algebra 4

SOC 321

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity 4

SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4

PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

SPK 211

4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to work effectively in groups. Students will collaborate to complete a group project and multiple presentations. Course content covers key concepts of group dynamics such as diversity, group roles, ethical issues, and conflict resolution. Students will hone group communication skills and effectively use technology to communicate with group members.

Prerequisite(s):
Education Majors: SPK 201.
Corequisite(s):
EDU 312A. All other majors: PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics 4

SPK 401A

4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Professional Speaking 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 193
Program Description

Program Description

This program is designed to work in conjunction with the Associate of Applied Science degree in Web Design to provide individuals with additional technical skills in the Web development field. While the associatem degree gives students a generalist base of skills, this degree targets the programming and development skills required to develop interactive, database driven websites.

Accreditation

Accreditation

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

My professors actually work in the field and have hands-on experience with photonics and lasers.

Dennis LaPort
Photonics Story