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Help people see more clearly.

Prepare for a great career.

Opticians are eye care professionals who dispense, adjust, and repair eyewear that helps people see more clearly. They analyze and interpret optical prescriptions; help customers select and fit the frames, contact lenses, or other optical devices that are best for their needs; and place the order. When the finished products arrive, they confirm accuracy, and make any needed fitting adjustments.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
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    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
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    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
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    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
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    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

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Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

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The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

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Opticianry

Help people see more clearly.

Prepare for a great career.

Opticians are eye care professionals who dispense, adjust, and repair eyewear that helps people see more clearly. They analyze and interpret optical prescriptions; help customers select and fit the frames, contact lenses, or other optical devices that are best for their needs; and place the order. When the finished products arrive, they confirm accuracy, and make any needed fitting adjustments.

Career Facts

$34,280

Median salary for Opticians, Dispensing

24%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$43,558

Median salary for Optical Store Managers

View citations

Overview

Overview

The Baker College Opticianry associate degree program has been developed with the guidance of employers in the field and is taught by experienced eye care professionals.

Through classwork and hands-on training in using the newest technology and tools, you learn how to read optical prescriptions, take precise measurements, fit eyewear properly, and more. When you graduate, you’ll be fully prepared to sit for the national certification exam, and have all the training necessary to launch your career.

This program is part of the Baker College Smart Degree Option.

Overview of the Ophthalmic Profession

OPTICIAN – An optician is a professional who has the responsibility for the dispensing of eyewear, including spectacles, contact lenses, low-vision aids, and accessories.  The optician may fabricate, verify, and fit eyeglasses, contact lenses and other optical devices upon the written prescription of a medical doctor or doctor of optometry.  Once presented with this prescription, an optician is responsible for analyzing and interpreting the prescription to determine the lenses that are best suited to the patient’s lifestyle and visual needs.  Frame selection, including size and material, is then chosen.  The optician takes measurements to insure proper lens placement in the frame, and must verify the accuracy of the finished product.  The glasses are adjusted to the patient by the optician at the time of delivery.  Other duties include occasional adjustments to retain proper fit, replacements, and repairs of lenses and frames.

OPTOMETRIST – A Doctor of Optometry (O.D.) is specifically educated and trained to examine eyes, diagnose visual problems, and to prescribe eyeglasses, contact lens, low-vision aids, and visual therapy.  In some cases, the Optometrist may also be certified to utilize diagnostic and/or therapeutic ocular medications.  An optometrist may also dispense devices prescribed.  An Optometrist is not a medical doctor.

OPHTHALMOLOGIST – A Doctor of Medicine (M.D.) or Doctor of Osteopathic Medicine (DO)  who specializes in examining and treating any disease of the eye.  In addition to writing prescriptions for spectacles and contact lenses, the Ophthalmologist treats eye diseases with drugs and surgery.

OPHTHALMIC TECHNICIAN – There are three levels of technical personnel in ophthalmology – ophthalmic assistants, ophthalmic technicians, and ophthalmic technologists. They work under the supervision and direction of an ophthalmologist to perform ophthalmic clinical duties. They are trained to take medical histories, administer eye medications, instruct the patient in care and use of corrective lenses, perform all the ophthalmologic tests necessary for preliminary and highly specific eye exams, assist in ophthalmic surgery, and maintain ophthalmic and surgical instruments, as well as office equipment.

Ophthalmic technologists are trained for additional duties, such as taking ophthalmic photographs, using ultrasound, as well as providing instruction and supervision to other ophthalmic personnel. Ophthalmic technologists are expected to perform at a higher level of expertise than ophthalmic technicians and to exercise considerable clinical technical judgment.

OPTOMETRIC TECHNICIAN – Paraoptometrics are allied health personnel who assist optometrists in providing their highest level of vision care to patients. Front office procedures, chair-side assisting, pre-testing, contact lens instruction, frame styling and fitting, and vision therapy are just a few of the many duties paraoptometrics perform while working directly with an optometrist. There are three levels of paraoptometrics-Certified Paraoptometric (CPO), Certified Paraoptometric Assistant (CPOA), and Certified Paraoptometric Technician (CPOT).

Course Information

Course Information

Opticianry Major Requirements59 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ELECT 100A

4 Quarter Hours

The description of this course will vary depending on your choice.

Elective 4
MGT 114

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the elements of establishing superior service as an essential component of business success, including a focus toward interdepartmental cooperation and treating vendors, suppliers, and distributors the same as external customers. Customer contact skills including listening, courtesy, conflict management, problem solving, decision making, ethics, follow up, and communication are covered. Recommended as an introductory course for business majors or anyone having customer contact relationships.

Customer Service 4
OP 101

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the eye-care field and the profession of opticianry. Emphasis is placed on the scope of activities performed by opticians in the ophthalmic profession. This course will also identify the other professionals that work in the ophthalmic arena.

Introduction to Opticianry 4
OP 111

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the anatomical structure of the eye and its adnexa. An overview of common pathologies and pharmacology of the eye, as well as the function of the parts of the eye as they relate to vision and the fitting of spectacles and contact lenses will be presented.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 101.
Ocular Anatomy, Physiology, and Pathology 4
OP 121A

3 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the terminology, instruments, lenses, frames, and materials used in the optical laboratory to fabricate prescription eyewear.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 101.
Optical Laboratory Theory 3
OP 211

3 Quarter Hours

Examines the nature of light and details the behavior of light when it encounters various refractive and reflective surfaces. Examines lens power, indices, and prisms. Establishes the foundation for advanced optical applications.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 111, C or better in OP 121A.
Optical Theory I 3
OP 212

3 Quarter Hours

Continues the study of Optical Theory I, including prism notation, vertical imbalance and methods of correcting for it, vertex power, illuminance, reflection and absorption, diffraction, third-order lens aberrations and lens tilt, anisometropia, and spectacle magnification.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 211.
Optical Theory II 3
OP 221A

3 Quarter Hours

Provides fundamental knowledge for frame selection and dispensing techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 111, C or better in OP 121A.
Optical Dispensing I Theory 3
OP 222A

3 Quarter Hours

Provides more in-depth study into dispensing techniques for low vision, sports vision, and geriatric vision.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 221A.
Optical Dispensing II Theory 3
OP 226

4 Quarter Hours

Presents the basic fundamentals, terminology, instrumentation, and practical procedures used in evaluating the visual system. Basic information is presented on theory and use of opthalmic instruments. Various problems associated with vision will also be presented.

Ophthalmic Procedures 4
OP 231

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the history of contact lenses, contact lens materials, contact lens fitting philosophies, selection of lenses, inspection and verification, follow-up care, lens care and storage, and regulations regarding contact lenses.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 101, C or better in OP 111, C or better in OP 121A
Introduction to Contact Lenses 2
OP 232

4 Quarter Hours

Allows students to apply the knowledge gained from Introduction to Contact Lenses to expand their knowledge base to the fitting philosophies of current contact lens designs. Students will have 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 231.
Contact Lenses 4
OP 241

2 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes basic management and leadership skills necessary for a successful eye care office. Teaches the analysis, creative thinking, judgment, planning strategy, and implementation skills necessary for today’s optical business challenges.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 101, C or better in OP 111, C or better in OP 121A.
Opticianry Management 2
OP 251

4 Quarter Hours

Provides, in this capstone course, a comprehensive review that will prepare students to take the national certification exams for both spectacles and contact lens as well as current developments in lens materials, lens designs, and government regulations as they affect opticians.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 212, C or better in OP 222A.
Current Trends in Opticianry 4
OP 261

3 Quarter Hours

Provides students, in this hands-on course, the opportunity to develop the technical skills that they will need to become opticians. 60 hours of in-house laboratory clinical.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OP 121A.
Optical Dispensing Laboratory 3
OP 271

8 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the real-world optical dispensing experience. Externships will allow students to experience the different settings in which an optician may work. 240 hours of externship are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval, minimum GPA 2.50, all professional track Opticianry courses with a grade of C or better.
Opticianry Externship 8
WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
General Education Requirements32 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ELECT 120A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Communication Electives (Associate Degree)

Communication Elective 4
ELECT 161A

2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List – Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective 2
ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4
ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4
INF 112

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Word Processing 2
INF 114A

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Introduction to Database Applications 2
INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2
MTH 108

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application 4
SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4
PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 91
Program Description

Program Description

An optician is a professional who has the responsibility for the dispensing of eyewear, including spectacles, contact lenses, low-vision aids, and accessories. The optician may fabricate, verify, and fit eyeglasses, contact lenses and other optical devices upon the written prescription of a medical doctor or doctor of optometry. Once presented with this prescription, an optician is responsible for analyzing and interpreting the prescription to determine the lenses that are best suited to the patient’s lifestyle and visual needs. Frame selection, including size and material, is then chosen. The optician takes measurements to insure proper lens placement in the frame, and must verify the accuracy of the finished product. The glasses are adjusted to the patient by the optician at the time of delivery. Other duties include occasional adjustments to retain proper fit, replacements, and repairs of lenses and frames.

Graduates are eligible to sit for the National Opticianry Competency Exam administered by the American Board of Opticianry and the National Contact Lens Examination. Students may also sit for state licensure exams in states where applicable. At this time the state of Michigan does not require licensure or certification to practice this profession. The Baker College Opticianry Program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation (COA) and is recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA, http://www. chea.org/).

Program Status: Open Enrollment

Mission

Mission

The mission of the Baker College Opticianry program is to provide quality training and instruction in the profession of Opticianry resulting in an Associate of Applied Science degree.  As an equal opportunity institution, Baker College welcomes all and encourages its students to seek excellence in their studies.  The program further encourages the students to learn to conduct an ethical professional practice of Opticianry in order to provide a superior standard of care for the people of the State of Michigan.

Program Goals

Program Goals

The goals of the Baker College Opticianry program were developed in concert with the program’s philosophy and the mission and goals of the college.

  1. To upgrade the profession of Opticianry through formal opticianry education. Adding to the profession men and women who are well qualified to intrepret prescriptions, fabricate eyewear, dispense spectacles and contact lenses, communicate effectively, utilize sales techniques, and are self confident to serve the visual needs of the public.
  2. To stimulate growth and development of the Opticianry student into a responsible, competent, enthusiastic, professional who maintains ethical standards, and works well with other professionals in his/her field.
  3. To prepare Opticianry students for successful completion of the National Opticianry Competency Examination (NOCE) spectacle examination and is given by the ABO. The Contact Lens Registry Examinatiion (CLRE) given by NCLE for certification in contact lens dispensing.
  4. Eliminate hazardous waste and to reduce non-hazardous waste to the minimum levels economically and technically practical, and to be in full-compliance with all federal and state environmental regulations.
  5. To prepare graduates for entry-level employment in the optical field.
Accreditation

Accreditation

The Opticianry Program is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation (COA). The Commission on Opticianry Accreditation is a not-for-profit agency, which accredits formal Opticianry education in the United States by setting standards, assessing educational effectiveness, and identifying those academic programs that meet the standards, in order to aid programs to produce competent graduates who will provide professional services to the public. The COA is recognized by the Council on Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA); Web address: http://www.chea.org/.

The Opticianry Program is based on a task analysis developed by the American Board of Opticianry (ABO) and the National Contact Lens Examiners (NCLE). These organizations are national, non-profit organizations which administer voluntary certification examinations for dispensing opticians and contact lens technicians. Their purposes are to identify qualified eyewear providers by examination, urge growth of optical skills with continuing education, and approve continuing education programs. The ABO/NCLE programs are accredited by the National Commission for Certifying Agencies (NCCA) as having met their standards for certifying agencies.

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Application Information

Application Information

Prospective Students

An online application is available for Undergraduate and Graduate admission. You may also print the Application for Undergraduate Admission and apply through mail, or at the campus nearest you.

Returning Students

Returning students do not need to re-apply. Please contact the Academic Office on the campus that you plan to attend about returning to Baker College.

Campus Contacts

Campus Contacts

Baker College of Allen Park

Randall L. Smith, MS, ABOM, NCLEC

Opticianry Program Director
(517) 990-6945
randall.smith@baker.edu

Program Details

Program Details

The Baker College Opticianry program is a member of the National Federation of Opticianry Schools and is accredited by the Commission on Opticianry Accreditation.

The Opticianry Associate of Applied Science degree is a two-year, seven quarter curriculum.
An optician is a professional who has the responsibility for the dispensing of eyewear, including spectacles, contact lenses, low-vision aids, and accessories.  The optician may fabricate, verify, and fit eyeglasses, contact lenses and other optical devices upon the written prescription of a medical doctor or doctor of optometry.  An optician is responsible for analyzing and interpreting the prescription to determine the lenses that are best suited to the patient’s lifestyle and visual needs. The optician takes measurements to insure proper lens placement in the frame, and must verify the accuracy of the finished product.  The glasses are adjusted to the patient by the optician at the time of delivery.  .

Completion of the Opticianry degree results in the conferring of the Associate in Applied Science in Opticianry and will satisfy the education requirement of most state opticianry licensing boards.  The courses provide a basis for many different employment opportunities in the optical field, but are designed to provide the education needed to have a successful career as an OPTICIAN.

Opticianry Certificate Program is a one year four quarter curriculum.
An optician is a professional who has the responsibility for the dispensing of eyewear, including spectacles, low-vision aids, and accessories.  The optician may fabricate, verify, and fit eyeglasses,  and other optical devices upon the written prescription of a medical doctor or doctor of optometry.  An optician is responsible for analyzing and interpreting the prescription to determine the lenses that are best suited to the patient’s lifestyle and visual needs. The optician takes measurements to insure proper lens placement in the frame, and must verify the accuracy of the finished product.  The glasses are adjusted to the patient by the optician at the time of delivery.

Graduation from the program may lead to one of the following occupational goals: optician, private practitioner, ophthalmic dispenser, optical laboratory manager, contact lens technician, branch manager, optical laboratory technician, ophthalmic sales representative, ophthalmic research technician, instructor in ophthalmic dispensing.

Learning Outcomes

Learning Outcomes

The learning outcomes for a graduate of the Opticianry program should include but are not limited to the following:

  • Define the scope of practice of opticians, optometrists, ophthalmologist and other eyecare professionals.
  • Explain the history of lenses, eyeglasses and Opticianry.
  • Describe how glass and other optical lens materials are manufactured.
  • Explain the theories of light and the electromagnetic spectrum.
  • Analyze the ophthalmic prescription and its parts.
  • Explain the application and use of the lens cross and flat transposition.
  • Describe the refractive errors and their correction.
  • Explain the process of measuring visual acuity.
  • Identify the use and parts of the lensometer.
  • Determine the power of the cylinder away from the axis.
  • Explain prism and how it affects the patient.
  • Explain Snell’s Law and the index of refraction.
  • Explain and demonstrate the steps of the ophthalmic finishing process.
  • Explain and demonstrate the uses of the lensometer.
  • Explain basic record keeping procedures.
  • Identify frame adjustment tools.
  • Describe techniques of hardening glass lenses, and policies of FDA and ANSI regarding testing of impact resistance.
  • Explain proper laboratory and workshop safety procedures.
  • Explain proper handling and techniques for proper environmental handling of optical substances and waste products.
  • Describe the specialized application of aphakic lenses.
  • Define and explain presbyopia and the different lens forms used for correction.
  • Demonstrate skills in prescription interpretation and analysis.
  • Apply ANSI standards to ophthalmic eyewear.
  • Describe the procedures used in surfacing lenses.
  • Explain the applications of specialty lenses.
  • Demonstrate an understanding of lifestyle dispensing.
  • Demonstrate clinical dispensing skills.
  • Understand clinical management skills.*
  • Explain effective communication skills both verbal and written within the optical industry.
  • Understand basic optical management procedures.
  • Describe the use of absorptive lenses.
  • Understand proper base curve selection.
  • Calculate lens edge and center thickness.
  • Define and describe the parts, styles and materials of current spectacle frames.
  • Explain the boxing and datum systems of measuring frames and how to interpret frame markings.
  • Execute accurate monocular and binocular interpupillary measurements.
  • Describe the six major types of lens aberrations and how they affect vision.
  • Analyze the special needs of the high myope and high hyperope to include lenses and frames and etc.
  • Explain properties of visible and invisible light.
  • Calculate and correct vertical prism at the reading level.
  • Explain and demonstrate basic bench alignment.
  • Describe and demonstrate basic frame adjustments.
  • Demonstrate how to take accurate bifocal, trifocal and progressive height measurements.
  • Demonstrate the skills of ordering and processing prescription eyewear.
  • Understand ethical professional conduct for opticians.
  • Understand the lens coating processes.
  • Understand the use of current technology at work in the ophthalmic field.
  • Understand the need for basic equipment maintenance and repair.
  • Demonstrate basic frame repairs.
  • Demonstrate a basic understanding of the history and development of contact lenses.*
  • Describe the nomenclature of contact lenses.*
  • Understand the theory behind the corneal/lens relationship.*
  • Understand the physiological parameters for fitting contact lenses.*
  • Understand the human optical system and ocular anatomy.
  • Demonstrate product knowledge and understanding of the diverse uses of optical  products.

* Outcomes not covered in certificate program

General Education Outcomes

General Education Outcomes

  • The graduate will demonstrate the ability to effectively communicate ideas in both written and oral forms.
  • The graduate will comprehend, communicate and interpret numeric information.
  • The graduate will apply basic computer skills to the management of information.
  • The graduate will distinguish among the various cultures and ethnic groups of the world as well as identify the common bonds all humans share.
  • The graduate will explore, analyze and explain major patterns of human behavior within the personal and social environment.
Program Performance

Program Performance

2008 – 2009 2009 – 2010
Applicants Associate: 21
Certificate: 19
Graduates 2 graduates employed in the optical profession Associate: 12
Certificate: 2
Baker ABO Exam Pass Rate 89%
National ABO Exam Pass Rate 58%
Baker NCLE Pass Rate 60%
National NCLE Pass Rate 61%
Baker NOCE Pass Rate 100%
National NOCE Pass Rate 68%

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
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Wherever I reached out for help, it was there; it was easy.

Anne Schomaker
Baker Graduate