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Help solve sleep problems.

Prepare to improve people’s lives.

Polysomnographic technologists are specially trained to run sleep studies and other tests that doctors use to diagnose and treat sleep-related disorders. Working under a doctor’s supervision, they use sophisticated equipment to gather data and information about how patients sleep, and analyze their sleep patterns. Technologists may also assist patients in understanding and adjusting to the recommended treatment.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

An Introduction to Your Life at Baker College

The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

Getting Started

There’s a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
Schedule a Visit
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Wherever I reached out for help, it was there; it was easy.

Anne Schomaker
Baker Graduate

Polysomnographic Technology

Help solve sleep problems.

Prepare to improve people’s lives.

Polysomnographic technologists are specially trained to run sleep studies and other tests that doctors use to diagnose and treat sleep-related disorders. Working under a doctor’s supervision, they use sophisticated equipment to gather data and information about how patients sleep, and analyze their sleep patterns. Technologists may also assist patients in understanding and adjusting to the recommended treatment.

Career Facts

$44,200

Median salary for Neurodiagnostic Technologists

22%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$62,540

Median salary for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists

View citations

Overview

Overview

Baker’s  Polysomnographic Technology associate degree program is taught by experts in the field to fully prepare you to help physicians diagnose and treat sleep disorders. Through classwork, hands-on training in Baker’s specialized lab, and clinical experience, you develop the skills and knowledge to assess patients, prepare them for sleep studies, and gather data using observation and polysomnography equipment.

When you complete the program, you’ll be fully prepared for your first job, without additional training.

The most recent grads, 2014-2015, have a 90% positive placement rate.

This program is part of the Baker College Smart Degree Option.

Course Information

Course Information

Polysomnographic Technology Major Requirements62 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
HSC 102

1 Quarter Hours

Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (HSC102): Breathes new life into resuscitation education, Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers (BLS) is designed to train professionals to respond to cardiac and breathing emergencies for adult, child, and infant victims. Consistent with the 2010 AHA Guidelines for CPR/ECC, BLS is the foundational CPR/AED program typically required for healthcare providers and public safety professionals. Through the use of lecture, skills demonstration and practice, case-based emergency response scenarios, and reflection and debriefing activities with a focus on team-based response, BLS builds the key critical thinking, problem solving, and team dynamic skills that are needed to drive better patient outcomes. Upon successful completion of the course, learners will receive a 2-year Basic Life Support for Healthcare Providers.

First Aid (Also required for HSC102): Prepares students to recognize and care for a variety of first aid emergencies and meets OSHA/workplace requirements. Through a combination of self-paced online learning and instructor-led classroom skill session you will have the opportunity to practice and demonstrate skill competency required for certification. The online portion features simulation learning – an interactive experience where participants respond to real-world emergencies in a virtual setting. The online portion must be completed prior to attending the classroom skill session and must be taken on a Flash-enabled computer with a high speed Internet connection. Upon successful completion of this course you will receive a certificate for First Aid valid for two years.

BLS Provider Training and First Aid 1
HSC 104

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record. A grade of B- or better must be maintained to satisfactorily complete this course. HIT students must get a grade of B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI100F or SCI102C
Introduction to Disease 4
HSC 111

4 Quarter Hours

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

Introduction to Healthcare 4
MED 103

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology 4
MTH 109

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II 4
PST 101

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the profession of polysomnographic technology. Topics include the history and an overview of sleep medicine. Additionally, this course will discuss the skills necessary to evaluate and assess the patient and their medical record for information that is pertinent to appropriate data acquisition, patient care, and therapeutic acquisition.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in ENG 102, B- or better HSC 111, B- or better MED 103, B- or better SCI 100F, B- or better MTH 109 or MTH 112A
Corequisite(s):
B- or better PST 111
Introduction to Polysomnography 4
PST 111

1 Quarter Hours

Presents a series of discussions by professionals about the field of polysomnography. Weekly lectures include insight into the profession from various medical specialties and the relationship that sleep studies have on the human body.

Corequisite(s):
PST 101
Polysomnographic Seminar I 1
PST 112

1 Quarter Hours

Presents a continuous series of discussion by professionals on current topics in polysomnography and other related areas of medicine. Weekly lectures include insight into the profession about individual clinical problems.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 111, B- or better in PST 121, B- or better in PST 131, B- or better in PST 201, B- or better in PST 261.
Polysomnographic Seminar II 1
PST 121

2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on general patient assessment, communication skills, and basic techniques in patient handling. Skill sets will include; vital signs, lead placement, interview and documentation techniques, the administration of pre- and post-procedure questionnaires and follow-up processes as well as patient safety precautions.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
PST 131, PST 201, PST 261
Patient Preparation 2
PST 131

2 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to recognize the appropriate interactions between technologists, patients, and other health professionals as it relates to legal and ethical principles of patient care. Current trends in confidentiality, behavioral observations and documentation will be included. In addition, the day to day operational functionality and management of the facility will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
PST 121, PST 201, PST 261
Professional Management and Legal Issues 2
PST 201

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an introduction to general electrical theory, safety and amplification. Students will learn to calculate calibration signals required by electrophysiologic monitoring devices and summarize the process of measuring the electromechanical functions of the human body. Proficiency in equipment evaluation and troubleshooting skills will be key outcomes for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
PST 121, PST 131, PST 261
Electronic Theory and Instrumentation Monitoring 4
PST 211

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the organization and study of the international classification of sleep disorders. Emphasis will be on etiology and epidemiology as it relates to all classifications of sleep disorders. Other areas of inquiry will include; symptomology, indicated test procedures, and appropriate therapeutic modalities for disorders of sleep.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 121, B- or better in PST 131, B- or better in PST 201, B- or better in PST 261.
Therapeutic Interventions 4
PST 221A

2 Quarter Hours

Explores basic EEG and reviews the anatomy and physiology of the nervous and cardiopulmonary systems with emphasis on abnormalities during sleep and wake. Topics include; the anatomy of the upper airway, pulmonary and cardiac systems, pulmonary ventilation mechanics, and pulmonary blood flow. Discussions will include the structure and function of the brain, its relationship to the generation of sleep and benefits of normal sleep architecture and consequences of sleep deprivation as well as the mechanism of breathing.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 121, B- or better in PST 131, B- or better in PST 201, B- or better in PST 261.
Neuroanatomy and Pathology 2
PST 231

2 Quarter Hours

Explores the treatment options for sleep apnea syndrome to include; CPAP, Bi-level, humidification, surgical, oral/dental, positional therapies, pharmacology, sleep hygiene, and nutrition. Other topics that will be discussed include the affects common drugs have on the polysomnogram and recognizing and responding to emergency situations.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 121, B- or better in PST 131, B- or better in PST 201, B- or better in PST 261.
Cardiorespiratory Pharmacology 2
PST 241

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on learning the computer systems used for the collection, analysis, and archiving of sleep studies. Evaluation of computer hardware, software, in-lab and portable digital systems and database management will be discussed. Windows and Windows NT based programs will be emphasized. The computer technology used in monitoring human sleep will introduce students to software programs designed to specifically record EEG, EMG, ECG, airflow, respiratory effort, oximetry, snoring, ETCO2 as well as other possible parameters of sleep. Students will develop skills in patient data entry, creating and managing patient databases and printing reports. Other areas include; biomedical or IS support, warranties, extended service plans, and software updates. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 112, B- or better in PST 211, B- or better in PST 221A, B- or better in PST 231, B- or better in PST 262.
Sleep Analyzing Computers 4
PST 261

2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the first on site laboratory practicum experience in sleep study technology. Participants will gain insight from day-to-day sleep laboratory operations and interactions with patients and practitioners. The number of hours in the laboratory practicum is 40 hours. The students experience will begin developing the technical and patient skills needed to actively participate in sleep study activities.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
PST 121, PST 131, PST 201
Polysomnography Clinical I 2
PST 262

2 Quarter Hours

Integrates the student’s practicum application of knowledge with their ability to perform Polysomnograhic testing. Skills include patient interaction, setup and monitoring of equipment, continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) and Bi-level titrations. The laboratory practicum will include documentation and completion of studies to include; tear down and clean-up. Scoring of the various sleep monitoring events will be explored. 40 practicum hours are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 121, B- or better in PST 131, B- or better in PST 201, B- or better in PST 261.
Polysomnography Clinical II 2
PST 271

4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to participate in a 160 hour clinical experience with patients and technologists at an approved sleep disorder center or hospital. This internship will include all aspects involved in a polysomnologist’s responsibilities. Students must be prepared and willing to participate on any shift that may be required to complete this 160 hour internship experience.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval, B- or better in PST 112, B- or better in PST 211, B- or better in PST 221A, B- or better in PST 231, B- or better in PST 262.
Polysomnography Internship 4
PST 281

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes advance techniques and integration of all the components of sleep medicine technology will be addressed in this course. Evaluation and assessment techniques, scoring, quality control, and facility protocols.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in PST 112, B- or better in PST 211, B- or better in PST 221A, B- or better in PST 231, B- or better in PST 262.
Advanced Polysomnography 4
PST 291

2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on didactic lectures and mock reviews which review the subject matter needed to successfully complete the Board of Registered Polysomnographic Technologist (BRPT) examination. The course will consist of a review of already acquired technical and clinical skills. Students’ areas of test weaknesses and strengths will be identified through practice exams with instructor feedback.

Prerequisite(s):
PST 231, PST 221A, PST 262, PST 112, PST 211
Corequisite(s):
PST 281, PST 271, PST 241
Polysomnography Registry Review 2
SCI 100F

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the structural organization of body systems. This course is designed for students with limited background in chemistry and biology. This course is intended for allied health students who need an overview of body systems. Students should check specific program requirements for anatomy and physiology before enrolling.

Structure and Function of the Human Body 4
WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
General Education Requirements28 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4
ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4
INF 121

2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows 2
INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2
MTH 108

4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application 4
SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ENG 221

4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis 4
ENG 231

4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Language and Culture 4
WRI 115

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student’s individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4
PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 90
Program Description

Program Description

Polysomnography is a new, rapidly growing, health related field dedicated to the study of sleep disorders. With millions of people being tested in sleep laboratories and few formal training programs nationwide, opportunities for qualified polysomnographers (sleep study technologists) are outstanding. These specialists work in state-of-the-art laboratories where they assess patients and prepare them for sleep studies. They also operate, monitor, and troubleshoot highly sophisticated sleep computers to analyze sleep patterns. With the information they gather, sleep technologists help physicians diagnose and treat sleep disorders. Baker College’s Associate of Applied Science Degree program in Polysomnographic Technology offers comprehensive preparation for entry into this important field. Specialized laboratories help students develop the expertise needed to become independent clinicians.

Program Status: Limited Enrollment

Accreditation

Accreditation

The Polysomnography Program at the Flint campus is accredited by the Commission on Accreditation of Allied Health Education Programs (CAAHEP), 25400 US Highway 19 North, Suite 158, Clearwater, FL 33763; (727) 210-2350; fax: (727) 210-2354; Web address: www.caahep.org on the recommendation of the Committee on Accreditation for Polysomnographic Technologist Education (CoAPSG) 1711 Frank Avenue, New Bern, NC 28560; (252) 626-3238; Contact e-mail: office@coapsg.org; Web address: www.coapsg.org.

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
Watch this testimonial Watch Testimonial

I wouldn’t be in the position that I’m in, without having my degree.

Sandy Schrah
General Motors