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Help people live more independently.

Prepare for a career that has rewards every day.

Occupational therapists work with people who have physical and mental challenges, helping them improve their ability to perform everyday tasks and achieve more independence. They begin by making an assessment of the patient’s current abilities, and then develop and implement a plan of care that help the patient learn or regain the skills they need to live and work.

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
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    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
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    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
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    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
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  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
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    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
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    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

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Only offered on the Flint campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

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Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

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Pre-Occupational Therapy

Help people live more independently.

Prepare for a career that has rewards every day.

Occupational therapists work with people who have physical and mental challenges, helping them improve their ability to perform everyday tasks and achieve more independence. They begin by making an assessment of the patient’s current abilities, and then develop and implement a plan of care that help the patient learn or regain the skills they need to live and work.

Career Facts

$78,810

Median salary for Occupational Therapists

27%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$92,810

Median salary for Medical and Health Services Managers

View citations

Overview

Overview

Baker’s Pre-Occupational Therapy bachelor degree program combines classroom work with hands-on training to teach you the fundamentals and skills necessary to develop and implement treatment plans for people of varying ages and abilities.

Your courses are designed to promote one-on-one interaction with your instructors who are professionals in the field and share their knowledge and real-world experience. You also have rotations in clinical settings that enable you to apply what you learn and gain a deeper understanding.

The Baker College Bachelor of Health Science and Master of Occupational Therapy programas are combined as a 4+1 degree program. You complete four years of undergraduate study and one year of graduate study in the Master of Occupational Therapy program. By completing both portions of the program, including the Level II clinical courses, you will be eligible to sit for the national certification exam and qualify for state licensure.

A criminal conviction may prevent eligibility to sit for the national certification examination, qualification for state licensure, specific employment opportunities, and placement at Level I and Level II clinical sites.

Course Information

Course Information

Pre-Occupational Therapy Major Requirements124 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
HSC 402A

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Ethics for Health Professionals 4
MED 103

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology 4
MTH 401

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111
Statistical Methods 4
OCC 101

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of the profession including the Practice Framework and the threads of the curriculum (client-centered, occupation-based intervention, and professional ethics). The various levels of the profession are explained as well as the credentialing process. The application for the program is distributed in this course and it is a prerequisite for acceptance. This is the first course in occupational therapy offered in the curriculum and is therefore a foundation course.

Introduction to Occupational Therapy 4
OCC 201B

5 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an understanding of activities and their historical implications in the practice of occupational therapy. Activity analysis will be explored in detail. Analysis opportunities will occur in areas like activities of daily living/self-care and leisure skills. Crafts and the use of mediums will be presented to assist students with understanding the importance of being able to teach life tasks. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in OCC 101, B- or better in SCI 271A.
Therapeutic Use of Occupation I 5
OCC 202B

5 Quarter Hours

Reviews purposeful activity in occupational therapy. Activity analysis, adapting, and grading activities for therapeutic purposes are covered in detail. Students are introduced to sensory, neuromotor, cognitive, and psychosocial dimensions of performance. The client interview process will be introduced. Clinical reasoning and the teaching of an activity will be covered. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 201B.
Therapeutic Use of Occupation II 5
OCC 205

2 Quarter Hours

Focuses on range of motion assessment and applying manual muscle testing techniques in a laboratory-based setting. 10 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in OCC 101, B- or better in SCI 271A.
Range/Muscle Testing 2
OCC 221A

2 Quarter Hours

Provides field observation of children of varying ages and needs. Students have the opportunity to observe and consider the implication a disability has on development. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie the observations to the occupational therapy process. 10 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 202B, Student background check, DHS clearance.
Corequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 241
Level I Fieldwork (Children) 2
OCC 231

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the concepts of occupational therapy assessment. This course includes a discussion of the processes involved for choosing assessment tools and types of assessments; the relation of the assessment process to the performance areas of self-care, work, play, and leisure skill areas; and a discussion of the assessment of sensory, neuromotor, cognitive and psychosocial performance components. An overview of the physiologic dimensions of activity and assessment is provided. Students are required to use hands-on experience in using assessment in a simulated test situation. Recent literature on assessment is reviewed. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 202B.
Assessment of Occupational Performance 4
OCC 241

4 Quarter Hours

Examines child development from birth through 18. This course covers reflexes and motor and sensory development through age 5 in detail. Pathology/conditions and their implications to development are discussed thoroughly.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 221
Corequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 221A
Child Development and the Implications of Pathology/Conditions 4
OCC 302

4 Quarter Hours

Outlines conditions and disorders including etiology and clinical progression from adulthood to late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 332.
Mental Health Conditions and Occupational Dysfunction 4
OCC 313

4 Quarter Hours

Includes designing and restructuring the physical environment to assist self-care, work, play, and leisure performance. Emphasis is on architectural barriers and utilization of wheelchairs and other equipment. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 231.
Personal and Environmental Adaptations 4
OCC 314A

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students, in a laboratory-based setting, with hands-on opportunity to develop documentation skills centered around a problem-based format.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Introduction to Documentation in the Healthcare System 4
OCC 322B

2 Quarter Hours

Students will investigate services that assist people in regaining performance/independence. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie community services to the occupational therapy process. 10 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 221A.
Occupational Therapy and Case Management 2
OCC 323A

2 Quarter Hours

Provides field observation in settings that offer services for the older adult. Students consider implications of the aging process and the need to retain skills/performance. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie the observations to the occupational therapy process. 10 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 332
Level I Fieldwork (Late Adulthood) 2
OCC 331

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students a clinically-based approach to apply occupational therapy evaluation/assessment to individuals with physical dysfunction. Students will determine an individual’s abilities and capacities to carry out occupational function. This course will build on concepts from assessment of occupational performance, ROM, and MMT. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 205, C or better in OCC 231.
Evaluation of Occupational Performance 4
OCC 332

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the development of theory and the relationship of theory to current professional practice. This course utilizes current occupational therapy theory to examine practices in both psychosocial and physical disabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 231, SCI 311.
Occupational Therapy Theory/Frames of Reference 4
OCC 341

4 Quarter Hours

Studies disease/injuries, including etiology and clinical progression from young through late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed. This is a continuation of OCC241.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 311.
Disease/Injury and Occupational Dysfunction 4
OCC 351

4 Quarter Hours

Completes the study of conditions that impact normal development and performance. The aging process as well as specific diseases/conditions commonly experienced by the older adult are presented. Current concepts addressing prevention are explored.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 221.
The Aging Process and the Implications of Pathology/Conditions 4
OCC 402A

5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes application of theory to practice with an adult population. Intervention strategies to assist people with regaining performance are covered. Consideration is also given to conditions seen frequently in practice settings. This course requires students to prioritize needs and demonstrate proficiency with common modalities. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 341.
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies (Early/Middle Adulthood) 5
OCC 403A

5 Quarter Hours

Explores assessment, treatment planning, and development of intervention strategies with the older adult. Strategies designed to enhance/retain performance with emphasis on quality of life are presented. Performance areas including activities of daily living, work, and play or leisure are analyzed as applied to this population. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 351, C or better in OCC 402A.
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies (Late Adulthood) 5
OCC 406

4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the basic concepts, evolution, utilization, and legislative issues surrounding wellness, complementary, and integrative therapies used in treatment. Students will experience the use of complementary/integrative therapies to enhance personal wellness and clinical skills.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 271A, C or better in OCC 402A.
Complementary Therapies, Wellness and Occupation 4
OCC 413

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces the organization, administrative structure, and functions of occupational therapy service programs. Emphasis is on communication techniques, differentiating the levels of functions of staff and legal implications of service delivery. In addition, exploration of practice settings will occur (ie work-ergonomics). Development of positions in existing and new practice settings will be emphasized. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 332.
Roles of Occupation and Psychosocial Treatment Interventions 4
OCC 414

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the role in work related services including principles of wellness, ergonomics, work hardening, work site, and job analysis. Students will be exposed to evaluating, designing, and restructuring the work environment to enhance participation in productive activities. Additionally, students will participate in team-based assignments with other disciplines. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 313.
Return to Work and Functional Adaptation 4
OCC 415

4 Quarter Hours

Explores a variety of roles for the occupational therapist in community-based settings. Students will learn to apply the philosophical roots of occupational therapy to contemporary practice. In addition, students will gain an overview of funding sources, governmental policies, and documentation needs relevant to community-based practice. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 331.
Community-Based Occupational Therapy 4
OCC 416

4 Quarter Hours

Provides students a clinically-based approach to apply occupational therapy evaluation/assessment. Students will determine an individual’s abilities and capacities required to carry out occupational function.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in OCC 231.
Applied Assessment and Documentation 4
PSY 221

4 Quarter Hours

Examines changes that occur across the human life span, from conception to old age and death. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Developmental Psychology 4
SCI 101C

5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5
SCI 102C

5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the structure and function of the various body systems. Laboratory work will include the dissection of mammal organs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 101C.
Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5
SCI 271A

5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes advanced human anatomy and physiology as well as the study of movement biomechanics and basic physics principles. Angiology, arthrology, osteology, and myology are explored by anatomical region. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Clinical Kinesiology 5
SCI 311

4 Quarter Hours

Gives students a base of knowledge of the organizing principles of human neural structure and function. Upon completion of the course, students should have a good foundation for future clinical or other advanced courses in neuroscience.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Neuroanatomy 4
WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
General Education Requirements60 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4
ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4
GEO 101B

4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people’s lives.

World Geography I 4
INF 112

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Word Processing 2
INF 113

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Electronic Spreadsheets 2
INF 121

2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows 2
INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2
MTH 111

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra 4
MTH 112A

4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
College Algebra 4
PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
PSY 211

4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying 4
SOC 321

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity 4
SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
SPK 211

4 Quarter Hours

Prepares students to work effectively in groups. Students will collaborate to complete a group project and multiple presentations. Course content covers key concepts of group dynamics such as diversity, group roles, ethical issues, and conflict resolution. Students will hone group communication skills and effectively use technology to communicate with group members.

Prerequisite(s):
Education Majors: SPK 201.
Corequisite(s):
EDU 312A. All other majors: PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics 4
WRI 115

4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student’s individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Workplace Communication 4
WRI 301A

4 Quarter Hours

Improves students ability to write for business and technical purposes relevant to student’s major field or career aspirations. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Students will practice and develop skills for writing and communicating in a professional environment.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115
Report Writing 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
HIS 301

4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102
Women’s Studies 4
HIS 351

4 Quarter Hours

Investigates major events and developments in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations from the period.

World History I 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours
PSY 211

4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying 4
PSY 335

4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality 4
PSY 351

4 Quarter Hours

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. This course focuses on understanding adolescents in our society. The emphasis is on behavior development in establishing skills necessary to work with this group. This includes physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Adolescent Psychology 4
PSY 401

4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 184
Program Description

Program Description

This program is concerned with providing a practical education that will enable graduates to apply their skills to a diverse population in a variety of settings. The curriculum will provide students with early exposure to the occupational therapy profession and to those conceptual models that are applied by occupational therapists on a daily basis. The combined Pre-Occupational Therapy program and the Master of Occupational Therapy program are currently recognized as fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and can be reached by mail at: c/o Accreditation Department, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449; (301) 652-AOTA; www.acoteonline.org.

Students must have successfully completed all Level I and Level II, clinical experiences, and have graduated from an accredited occupational therapy program to be eligible to sit for the national Occupational Therapist Registered Examination. States have licensure laws that occupational therapists must comply with to practice in that state. The accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) and the American Occupational Therapy Association have mandated that all entry-level occupational therapists be prepared at the master degree level beginning January 2007. Therefore, all pre-occupational therapy students will be required to apply to the Baker College Center for Graduate Studies upon completion of the Pre-Occupational Therapy program. The Baker College Bachelor of Health Science and Master of Occupational Therapy programs are combined as a 4+1 degree program; students complete four years of undergraduate study and one year of graduate study. Graduate admission is open only to students who have completed the Pre-Occupational Therapy program at Baker College of Flint. A criminal conviction may prevent eligibility to sit for the national certification examination, qualification for state licensure, specific employment opportunities, and placement at Level I and Level II clinical sites. Students are encouraged to contact state licensure agencies and the National Board for Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) at (301) 990-7979 or www.nbcot.org prior to applying to the program.

Program Status: Limited Enrollment

Accreditation

Accreditation

The combined Pre-Occupational Therapy program and the Master of Occupational Therapy program are currently recognized as fully accredited by the Accreditation Council for Occupational Therapy Education (ACOTE) of the American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA) and can be reached by mail at: c/o Accreditation Department, American Occupational Therapy Association (AOTA), 4720 Montgomery Lane, Suite 200, Bethesda, MD 20814-3449; (301) 652-AOTA; www.acoteonline.org.

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
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My education at Baker directly correlates with my success [at my job].

Lisa Acker