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Help doctors make the right diagnosis.

Prepare to provide quality healthcare services.

Radiologic technologists are skilled professionals who take x-rays and CAT scans that have been prescribed by licensed medical practitioners to help them make a diagnosis. Some radiologic technologists choose to specialize in one or more areas: x-ray, mammography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Frequently Asked Questions
  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
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    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
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    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
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    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time undergraduate freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

An Introduction to Your Life at Baker College

The Academic Welcome Experience provides students with a smooth and helpful transition to college life. Students will become familiar with campus life, academic requirements, student expectations, learning environments, and the many services and resources available to them. It is also an important time for forming relationships and connections with fellow students, program advisors, and other members of the Baker College community.

Throughout the Academic Welcome Experience, students participate in a wide array of academic, intellectual, social, and professional experiences available at Baker College. Students connect with their advisors and participate in informational sessions aimed toward exploring career opportunities, networking with professionals in their fields, and sharing program information.

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There’s a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

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Baker truly understands that statewide articulation agreements enable students to earn credit while still in high school.”

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Oakland Schools Career Focused Education

Radiologic Technology

Help doctors make the right diagnosis.

Prepare to provide quality healthcare services.

Radiologic technologists are skilled professionals who take x-rays and CAT scans that have been prescribed by licensed medical practitioners to help them make a diagnosis. Some radiologic technologists choose to specialize in one or more areas: x-ray, mammography, computed tomography (CT), or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI).

Career Facts

$57,307

Median salary for Radiologic Technologists

9%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$62,540

Median salary for Diagnostic Medical Sonographers and Cardiovascular Technologists and Technicians, Including Vascular Technologists

View citations

Overview

Overview

Baker College’s Radiologic Technology associate degree program has been designed with the input of employers in the industry, and taught by highly experienced professionals in the field. You learn to create high quality radiologic images through your studies in the classroom, state-of-the-art learning labs, closed-circuit video training, and actual clinical experience.

When you graduate, you’ll be job ready and prepared to sit for the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) examination. ARRT credentials are a recognized national standard for medical imaging and radiologic technology professionals.

This program is part of the Baker College Smart Degree Option.

Course Information

Course Information

Radiologic Technology Major Requirements101 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

HSC 151

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to health informatics, with primary focus on the function of electronic health records (EHR) systems in health care delivery. Emphasis will be directed toward interdisciplinary use of an EHR to enhance quality and safety in patient care. Students will learn to use EHR software, access a patient account, create a patient file, and to enter and retrieve data. Compliance with HIPAA and confidentiality will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101
Introduction to Electronic Health Records 2

MED 103

4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology 4

RAD 131

2 Quarter Hours

Introduces an overview of the foundations in radiography and the role of the radiographer as a member of the health care team. Principles, practices and policies of the healthcare organization are examined and discussed in addition to the professional responsibilities of the radiographer. The history of radiography will be presented along with legal and ethical issues related to the profession. Radiation protection will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 151, RAD 141
Introduction to Radiographic Practice 2

RAD 141

5 Quarter Hours

Exposes radiography students to basic concepts of patient care that will confront them in the medical setting. Theory and practice will include such areas as infection control, microbiology, history taking, vital signs, dealing with emergencies, and patient positioning and transfer methods. Emphasis on the total patient is presented with regards to the patient’s physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 151, RAD 131
Patient Care in Radiography 5

RAD 151

5 Quarter Hours

Explores the diverse field of diagnostic imaging equipment used in radiographic/fluoroscopic machines and generators. Radiographic film processing, types of film, and equipment problems will be investigated. Various image receptions will be analyzed. Emphasizes the concepts and tools used to generate exposures and create images. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 131, RAD 141
General Imaging I 5

RAD 152

5 Quarter Hours

Explores the diverse field of diagnostic imaging equipment used in radiographic/fluoroscopic machines and generators. Radiographic film processing, types of film, and equipment problems will be investigated. Various image receptions will be analyzed. Emphasizes the concepts and tools used to evaluate images and modify exposures. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 161, C or better in RAD 211, C or better in RAD 221, C or better in RAD 231.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 241, RAD 212
General Imaging II 5

RAD 161

2 Quarter Hours

Imparts an understanding of the components, principles and operation of digital imaging systems found in diagnostic radiology. Factors that impact image acquisition, display, archiving and retrieval are discussed. Principles of digital system quality assurance and maintenance are presented.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 151, C or better in RAD 131, C or better in RAD 141.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 211, RAD 221, RAD 231
Digital Imaging Concepts 2

RAD 211

5 Quarter Hours

Applies anatomical knowledge of structure and terminology of the chest, abdomen, upper and lower extremities to the production of diagnostic x-ray images. Positioning devices and techniques will be introduced. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 151, C or better in RAD 131, C or better in RAD 141.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 161, RAD 221, RAD 231
Radiographic Positioning I 5

RAD 212

5 Quarter Hours

Applies increasing anatomical knowledge of structure and terminology of the thorax, spine, abdomen, and skull to the production of diagnostic x-ray images. The optimal use of positioning devices and techniques will be reinforced in this course. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 161, C or better in RAD 211, C or better in RAD 221, C or better in RAD 231.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 152, RAD 241
Radiographic Positioning II 5

RAD 213

5 Quarter Hours

Applies knowledge of structure, function, and terminology of oral and intravenous contrast studies. Positioning devices, immobilization techniques, and trauma radiography will be included along with emphasis on radiation protection during fluoroscopy. Special considerations related to pediatric radiography will be introduced. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 152, C or better in RAD 241, C or better in RAD 212.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 251
Radiographic Positioning III 5

RAD 221

2 Quarter Hours

Provides basic concepts of pharmacology. The theory and practice of basic techniques of venipuncture and administration of diagnostic contrast agents and/or intravenous medications is included. The appropriate delivery of patient care during these procedures is emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 151, C or better in RAD 131, C or better in RAD 141.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 161, RAD 211, RAD 231
Radiographic Pharmacology 2

RAD 231

2 Quarter Hours

Explores basic concepts in general physics such as energy, power, work, momentum, force velocity, and acceleration. Fundamental theories of photon (quantum) properties are introduced. Analysis of the various interactions of ionizing radiation with matter is emphasized. Sources and measurement of ionizing radiation are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 151, C or better in RAD 131, C or better in RAD 141.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 161, RAD 211, RAD 221
Radiographic Science Theory 2

RAD 241

2 Quarter Hours

Explores biological principles that are fundamental to understanding radiation safety. The relationship of radiation dose level to somatic, genetic, and stochastic effects are emphasized. The importance of x-ray energy level and area of exposure is reinforced.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 161, C or better in RAD 211, C or better in RAD 221, C or better in RAD 231.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 152, RAD 212
Radiographic Biology and Protection 2

RAD 251

4 Quarter Hours

Expands the knowledge of special radiographic procedures, equipment, and techniques. Attention will be given to the areas of sectional anatomy, computed tomography (CT), angiography, and mammography. Advanced radiographic procedures will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 152, C or better in RAD 241, C or better in RAD 212.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 213
CT and Advanced Procedures 4

RAD 271

12 Quarter Hours

Provides the opportunity for development and application of basic clinical skills in a radiologic practice setting. This is the first of three clinical courses. Requires students to observe, participate, and independently prove competency in radiographic procedures presented in RAD211-213. Students will function under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until competency is proven; then supervision may be indirect. Many of the clinical objectives are outcome based on competency requirements of the ARRT. Other course objectives are outcome based on professional behavior and the continued learning of theoretical material from the prior year of study. Radiographic theory will be reinforced and expanded. This is a 12 week rotation including 472 clinical hours.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 251, C or better in RAD 213.
Radiographic Clinical I 12

RAD 272

12 Quarter Hours

Provides the opportunity for development and application of intermediate clinical skills in a radiologic practice setting. This is the second of three clinical courses. Requires students to observe, participate, and independently prove competency in the radiographic procedures presented in RAD211-213. Students will function under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until competency is proven; then supervision may be indirect. Many of the clinical objectives are outcome based on competency requirements of the ARRT. Other course objectives are outcome based on professional behavior and the continued learning of theoretical material from the prior year of study. Radiographic theory will be reinforced and expanded through Web-based instructional tools. This is a 12 week rotation including 472 clinical hours.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 271.
Radiographic Clinical II 12

RAD 273

10 Quarter Hours

Provides the opportunity for development and application of advanced clinical skills in a radiologic practice setting. This is the final clinical course for the program. Requires students to observe, participate, and independently prove competency in the radiographic procedures presented in RAD211-213. Students will function under the direct supervision of a registered technologist until competency is proven; then supervision may be indirect. Many of the clinical objectives are outcome based on competency requirements of the ARRT. Other course objectives are outcome based on professional behavior and the continued learning of theoretical material from the prior year of study. Radiographic theory will be reinforced and expanded through Web-based instructional tools. Activities that encourage professional development beyond entry-level will be included. This is a 10 week course including 380 clinical hours.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in RAD 272.
Corequisite(s):
RAD 291
Radiographic Clinical III 10

RAD 291

2 Quarter Hours

Emphasis will be placed on preparing the student to achieve the successful outcome of professional certification by synthesizing knowledge from previous coursework in radiography. Strategies for reinforcement of concepts that summarize cumulative knowledge will be introduced. A simulated radiography registry exam will be administered as a primary test for the graduation candidate. A passing score must be achieved on this test for successful completion of the course. This is the capstone course.

Corequisite(s):
RAD 273
Preparation to Achieve Student Success (PASS) 2

SCI 101C

5 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Human Anatomy and Physiology I 5

SCI 102C

5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the structure and function of the various body systems. Laboratory work will include the dissection of mammal organs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 101C.
Human Anatomy and Physiology II 5

SCI 211

4 Quarter Hours

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Pathophysiology 4

WRK 291B

1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate’s employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies 1
General Requirements26 Hours
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

ELECT 120A

4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List – Communication Electives (Associate Degree)

Communication Elective 4

ENG 101

4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I 4

ENG 102

4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students’ critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II 4

INF 161

2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society 2

MTH 111

4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra 4

SPK 201

4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication 4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course Number Course Title Credit Hours

PSY 101

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations 4

PSY 111

4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology 4
Quarter Hours Required for Graduation 127
Program Description

Program Description

Radiographers are highly skilled professionals qualified to perform diagnostic imaging procedures and examinations prescribed by licensed medical practitioners. Technologists apply knowledge of anatomy and physiology, positioning, and radiographic techniques to provide quality healthcare services. The mission of the Baker College Radiologic Technology program is to enable qualified students to develop into competent and professional entry-level radiographers who are prepared to successfully sit for the ARRT examination and acquire gainful employment. We believe that this is done through exercises in critical thinking, varied clinical experience, the encouragement of universally responsible behavior, and foundations in guiding radiologic principles.

Essential Functions

These technical standards reflect performance abilities and characteristics that are necessary to successfully complete the requirements of the program at Baker College. These standards are not conditions of admission to the program. Persons interested in applying for admission to the program should review this information to develop a better understanding of the physical abilities and behavioral characteristics necessary to successfully complete the program. The College complies with the requirements and spirit of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Therefore, the College will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations for participants with disabilities who are otherwise qualified.

  • Access information from books, reference manuals, computers, and paper and electronic medical records to accurately perform functions and duties.
  • Comprehend technical and professional materials (i.e. textbooks, journal articles, and procedure manuals) to accurately perform clinical testing and/or use of equipment.
  • Explain procedures and treatment appropriate to patient’s level of understanding including what will be required while respecting patient confidentiality and privacy.
  • Recognize and respond appropriately to distress sounds from patient, audible/visual alarms/signals on patient-monitoring equipment for patient safety.
  • Respond appropriately to changes in the patients’ status before, during, and after procedures.
  • Monitor and respond to patient and accessory medical equipment directly and by intercommunication system during procedure to assess patient response and safety.
  • Obtain optimum quality of radiographic images by clear discrimination of shades of gray.
  • Accurately interpret and validate text, numbers, and graphs from print and video monitors used for fluoroscopy and digital imaging.
  • Evaluate, synthesize, and communicate diagnostic information to the attending radiologist.
  • Recognize and correct performance deviations in imaging.
  • Perform or assist with transferring, lifting, moving, positioning, and manipulating the patient.
  • Transport heavy, wheeled equipment and patients in wheelchairs and/or stretchers.
  • Accurately obtain precise measurements and determine appropriate immobilization and positioning aids needed for performing procedures.
  • Provide safe and effective care including but not limited to administration of oral or rectal contrast medium.
  • Perform and document warm-up procedures and quality assurance checks on imaging and treatment equipment.
  • Recognize potentially hazardous materials, equipment, and situations and proceed safely in order to minimize risk of injury to patients, self, and nearby individuals by referencing, utilizing, and adhering to OSHA requirements such as MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets), universal precautions, radiation safety standards and policies and procedures.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional and procedural judgment decisions under stressful and/or emergency conditions (i.e. allergic reaction or cardiac arrest) and a distracting environment (i.e., high noise levels, crowding, complex visual stimuli).
  • Adhere to HIPAA, American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) professional standards, Baker College professional conduct guidelines, program requirements and clinical site policies and procedures.

Program Status: Limited Enrollment

Mission

Mission

The mission of the Baker College Radiologic Technology program is to enable qualified students to develop into competent and professional entry-level radiographers who are prepared to successfully sit for the ARRT examination and acquire gainful employment. We believe that this is done through exercises in critical thinking, varied clinical experience, the encouragement of universally responsible behavior, and foundations in guiding radiologic principles.

As an essential component of the Baker College’s academic health programs, the Associate Applied Science Degree (AAS) program has the following goals:

  • Students will perform competently.
  • Students will critically think and solve problems effectively.
  • Students will communicate effectively.
  • Students will develop and grow professionally.
  • Students will become successful graduates of the program.

Customer Satisfaction Policy

Baker College is an institution focused on customer satisfaction. To that end, any concerns or complaints regarding the Radiologic Technology Program can be sent to the attention of the director of the program on the appropriate campus. The director will investigate the complaint, consult with all parties involved, and provide a response as soon as all information has been evaluated. The program director will inform the Dean of Health Sciences of the complaint, investigation, and what actions have been taken.

If resolution cannot be reached at the level of the program director, the problem will follow the chain of command beginning with the Dean of Health Sciences, followed by the Chief Academic Officer/Vice President of Academics of the campus, the President of the campus, and finally the President of the Baker College System.

Goals & Student Learning Outcomes

Goals & Student Learning Outcomes

Goal I: Students will perform competently.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will produce high quality radiographs.
  • Students will apply appropriate radiation safety measures.
  • Students will consider the needs of others.

Goal II: Students will critically think and solve problems effectively.

Students Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will interpret radiologic principles.
  • Students will adapt to challenging clinical cases.
  • Students will critique radiographs properly.

Goal III: Students will communicate effectively.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will explain information to patients.
  • Students will organize information for physicians.
  • Students will plan patient care with other team members.

Goal IV: Students will develop and grow professionally.

Student Learning Outcomes:

  • Students will show support for the profession.
  • Students will consider opportunities for personal development.

Goal V: Students will become successful graduates of the program.

Program Effectiveness Outcomes:

  • Students will become graduates.
  • Graduates will be satisfied with the program.
  • Graduates will become registered radiologic technologists.
  • Graduates will obtain related employment.
  • Employers will be satisfied with graduates.
Accreditation

Accreditation

Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182, Phone: (312) 704-5300, Fax: (312)-704-5304, Email: mail@jcert.org. Web address: www.jrcert.org

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Program Performance

Program Performance

Clinton TownshipMuskegonOwosso
Program Completion Rate100 (16/16)88.9% (16/18)92.5% (25/27)
ARRT National Exam Pass Rate, 5 year avg. 2011-2015.
On 1st Attempt
100 (83/83)97.5 (78/80)91% (127/139)
5-year Average job placement rate of those graduates seeking employment within 12 months post graduation
(2011 - 2015)
84 (71/84)87.3% (62/71)87.5% (98/112)
# of students accepted each year (2015)171822

The JRCERT has defined “not actively seeking employment” as:
1) The graduate fails to communicate with program officials regarding employment status after multiple attempts OR

2) Graduate is unwilling to seek employment that requires relocation OR

3) Graduate is unwilling to accept employment due to salary or hours OR

4) Graduate is on active military duty OR

5) Graduate is continuing education.

Application Information

Application Information

Prospective Students

An online application is available for Undergraduate and Graduate admission. You may also print the Application for Undergraduate Admission and apply through mail, or at the campus nearest you.

Returning Students

Returning students do not need to re-apply. Please contact the Academic Office on the campus that you plan to attend about returning to Baker College.

Current Students

Application Deadline
Download the Application for the Radiologic Technology program PDF (for reference only).  Please contact the campus program director with which you are applying to access application/testing dates and deadlines.

Application Process
Initial selection will be based on the score that you provide in the box at the bottom of the application worksheet. The highest scoring applications will need to be verified before making initial candidate selections. Letters of initial (provisional) acceptance will be sent out during the last week of June. For those who have not yet completed SCI 211 with a grade of B- or better by the application deadline, final acceptance into the program will not occur until successful completion (B- or better) of the course during the summer quarter.

Limited Enrollment

Full acceptance into the professional track of some programs is limited due to clinical site availability. Students compete to earn acceptance into these programs. Selection criteria have been developed to choose the most qualified students for limited enrollment programs.  Students who have successfully completed the conditional acceptance requirements for their program are eligible to apply for full acceptance in to the professional track of the program. Refer to the program information supplement for program specific details on the application process, the criteria used, and the courses used in the GPA calculations.

Once selected through the limited enrollment criteria, for full acceptance into a program, students must complete program requirements including, but not limited to: program specific orientations, background checks, drug screens, etc. Please contact your campus official for additional information.

Campus Contacts

Campus Contacts

Clinton Township

Jufauri Ely M.B.A., R.T. (R) (AART)
Program Director Radiologic Technology
34950 Little Mack Avenue
Clinton Township, Michigan 48035
(586) 790-9401
jufauri.ely@baker.edu

Muskegon

Cameron J. Vander Stel, M.B.A., R.T. (R)
Radiography Program Director
1903 Marquette Ave.
Muskegon, MI 49442
(231) 777-5224
cameron.vanderstel@baker.edu

Owosso

Dan Smith BBL, RT (R)(CT) ARRT
Program Director, Radiologic Technology
]1020 S. Washington St.
Owosso, MI 48867
(989)-729-3420
dsmith134@baker.edu

Clinical Information

Clinical Information

Clinton Township

RAD 271 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 9/30/13
Thanksgiving day off
Ending 12/20/13 (Return to campus for meeting)
Christmas week off (December 23-27)

RAD 272 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 12/30/13
New Year’s Day off
Ending 3/21/14 (Return to campus for meeting)

RAD 273 (10 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/14
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Ending 5/30/14

RAD 291 (2 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/14
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Return to campus fo rmeeting on 6/4/14
Ending 6/6/14

Sit for certification exam : 6/6/14 – 6/13/14

Pinning Ceremony 6/12/14

Graduation Ceremony 6/7/14          

Muskegon

RAD 271 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 9/30/13
Thanksgiving day and the day after off
Ending 12/20/13 (return to campus for meeting)

Christmas week off (December 23 – 27)
RAD 272 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 12/30/13
New Year’s Day off
Ending 3/21/14 (return to campus for meeting)
RAD 273 (10 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/14
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Ending 5/30/14

RAD 291 (2 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/13
Return to campus for meeting on 6/4/14  – (Match Day)
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Ending 6/6/14
Sit for certification exam 6/6/14 – 6/13/14

Pinning Ceremony 6/12/14

Graduation Ceremony 6/13/14

Owosso

RAD 271 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 9/30/13
Thanksgiving day and the day after off
Ending 12/20/13 (return to campus for meeting)

Christmas week off (December 23-27)
RAD 272 (12 credits, 12 weeks)
Starting 12/30/13
New Year’s Day off
Ending 3/21/14 (return to campus for meeting)
RAD 273 (10 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/14
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Ending 5/30/14

RAD 291 (2 credits, 10 weeks)
Starting 3/24/14
Good Friday off
Memorial Day off

Return to campus for meeting on 6/4/14 (Match Day)
Ending 6/6/14

Graduation Ceremony 6/6/14

FAQ's

  • What is the high school GPA requirement to enroll into Baker?
    Baker College has a “right-to-try” admission policy. That means all students who have earned a high school diploma or its equivalent, such as a General Educational Development  (GED) certificate, are accepted at Baker. Find out more by reading our Undergraduate Admissions Requirements or by talking with an admissions advisor.
  • Can I take classes without a high school diploma or GED?
    If you haven't earned a diploma or a GED certificate, you may be able to take classes at Baker College. We will ask you to take placement tests to ensure you have the foundation of knowledge you need to successully complete college-level studies. Please contact the Admissions Office to learn more about our placement testing and admissions policy. Note: This does not apply to online students; for Baker Online, a diploma or GED certificate is required.
  • How do I apply for Financial Aid?
    Complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) using the school code for the Baker College Campus that you plan to attend. Remember, you must apply for financial aid every year. New applications are available after January 1st each year. Always complete your FAFSA as early as possible. To help speed the application process, we encourage you to have your taxes completed prior to applying. The Federal government’s FAFSA website allows you and/or your parent or guardian to link to the IRS website to retrieve tax information. Note: Students and parents of dependent students are required to apply for a Personal Identification Number (PIN) in order to sign the FAFSA application electronically. Please visit www.pin.ed.gov for more information.
  • How do I apply for a student loan?
    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin. If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.
    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:
    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
  • How do online classes work?

    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.
  • Is Baker College Online accredited?
    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan. As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education. All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant. Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:
  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?

    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:
    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips
  • Is Baker accredited?
    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in:
    • Business Administration
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • Human Services
    • School of Education
    • School of Nursing
    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages.
  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?
    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.
Testimonial quote

Baker’s direct credit and dual enrollment options have affected my education in ways I never could have imagined.

Morgan Rodenbaugh
BBA-Marketing Program