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ABT 1010
Painting and Refinishing
6

Introduces students to the basics for all automotive refinishing work. Safety precautions, surface preparations, spray gun and related equipment operation, paint mixing, paint application, and paint defects, causes and cures. Also covered are spot repairs, contemporary color coat materials such as low VOC and waterborne technology and final details. In this class students will prepair for the ICar Refinish exam. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate in Autobody Technicion program. All Icar Modules must be compleated to qualify to test for the Platium Refinish exam. 30 hours of lecture and 120 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1010L

ABT 1050
Body and Paint Practicum
6

Provides students with the opportunity to put their skills to work on complete full vehicles. Students will perform minor body work, R & R, body prep and final painting and detailing. In this class students will prepair for the ICar Refinish and Non-Structural exam. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate in Autobody Technicion program. All Icar Modules must be compleated to qualify to test for the Platium Refinish and Non-Structural exam. 30 hours of lecture and 120 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ABT 1010, ABT 1010L, ABT 1110, ABT 1110L

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1050L

ABT 1110
Non-structural Damage Repair
3

Introduces students to the basics for all automotive non-structural damage repair. Safety precautions, vehicle preparation, elementary repairs, outer body panel repairs, replacements, and adjustments are covered. In this class students will prepair for the ICarNon-Structural exam. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate in Autobody Technicion program. All Icar Modules must be compleated to qualify to test for the Platium Non-Structural exam. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1110L

ABT 1210
Structural Damage Repair
3

Introduces students to the structural aspects of vehicles in today's market. Students will be introduced to repairs such as door skin replacement, panel bonding, plastic repair and adhesives and fixed glass. In this course, students will develop specific marketable repair skills. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1210L

ABT 1710
Estimating and Shop Management
3

Introduces students to the basic processes of the automotive industry and how the estimating process is involved. Topics of focus are the estimate process both computer-based and hand-written, estimation adjustment, customer service, total losses, parts ordering, work flow, general shop running operations, and profit assessment and negotiation. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1710L

ABT 1910
Welding Processes
3

Covers the safety precautions in welding and cutting. Students learn the processes used in body repair such as MIG welding and alternative cutting techniques. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 1910L

ABT 2010
Professional Career Exploration Experience
1

Provides students with an opportunity to observe autobody careers, spanning a wide variety of applications in Michigan, and introduces them to NATEF/ASE workplace employability skills.

ABT 2210
Frame Repair Fundamentals
3

Introduces students to the basics for all automotive structural damage repairs. Safety precautions, frame inspection, measurements, part identification and estimation are covered. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 2210L

ABT 2310
Sheet Metal Fabrication
3

Introduces students to the processes used to cut, bend and assemble metal structures. Precision measurement will be taught in conjunction with the use of building from blue prints. Manual and powered variants for cutting will be taught, torching techniques using oxy-fuel or plasma torches. The use of pneumatic hammers such as a planishing hammer will be used to develop the students' skills in fabrication. Assembly techniques will also be taught including welding, adhesives, riveting and the use of threaded fasteners. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 2310L

ABT 2410
Interior Repair
3

Introduces student to automotive interior repair and upholstery restoration. Students will learn disassembly and assembly of seats, interior components and instrument panels. Sewing and interior design will be introduced. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 2410L

ABT 2510
Custom Paint
3

Teaches the basics of custom painting. Topics include air brushing, pin striping and tapping graphics. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ABT 2510L

ACC 1010
Principles of Accounting I
3

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1060

ACC 1020
Principles of Accounting II
3

Enables the students to prepare, evaluate, and use accounting data as an introduction to the accounting profession. The mechanics of financial accounting and the overall effect of accounting procedures on published financial statements are examined in detail. Alternative accounting procedures and their impacts on the financial statements are also examined. Coverage includes extensive examination of the accounting equation as well as the accounting process as it relates to receivables, inventory, fixes assets, and bonds payable.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010

ACC 1310
Accounting Applications
3

Reviews the usage of Excel spreadsheets for accounting applications, worksheets, schedules, and organizing various documents used in preparing accounting financial information.

Corequisite(s):
ACC 1020

ACC 1510
Payroll Accounting
3

Studies all aspects of payroll operations, including personnel and payroll records, computations of wages and salaries, relevant laws and acts pertaining to payroll, preparation of payroll registers, recording of accounting entries, and preparation of payroll tax returns.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1310

ACC 2010
Intermediate Accounting I
3

Begins an in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues relevant to presentation of financial information for use in external decision-making processes. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for a complex, classified balance sheet. Other topics include a review of the accounting cycle, preparation of financial statements, the conceptual framework, GAAP, and account reconciliation.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010, ACC 1020, ACC 1310

ACC 2310
Computerized Accounting
3

Emphasizes the usage of Quick-Books Accounting software, setting up the accounting records, recording transactions, and preparing the statements. This course will allow students to become certified in Quick-Books.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1310

ACC 2410
Individual Taxation
3

Provides in-depth coverage of the fundamentals of federal and state taxation related to individuals. Students will examine the federal tax system; research and apply tax law; and calculate gross income, deductions, and future tax liability. Tax planning for the individual will also be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010

ACC 2610
Cost Accounting I
3

Introduces students to the concepts of managerial accounting, including financial statement analysis, job order costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and use of other managerial decision-making tools.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1310

ACC 3010
Intermediate Accounting II
3

Continues the in-depth study of the theory and conceptual issues begun in Intermediate Accounting I. Emphasis is placed on reporting and disclosure requirements for multi-step income statement. Other topics include reinforcement of the accounting cycle and the interrelatedness of the financial statements and how various accounts affect them.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 2010

ACC 3410
Business Entities Taxation
3

Provides in-depth coverage of fundamentals of federal taxation related to business entities, including C and S corporations and partnerships. Emphasis is placed on the application of tax laws to the preparation of federal tax and informational return for these entities.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010

ACC 3610
Cost Accounting II
3

Continues Cost Accounting I, covering Strategic cost management, Activity base costing, the Balance Scorecard, Pricing and Profitability analysis and Capital Investment decision making.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 2610

ACC 4110
Auditing, Systems, and Controls I
3

Introduces students to the discipline of auditing, accounting systems, and internal controls in public and private sectors, as well as the auditing profession and the audit process. Topics covered will include audit reports, professional ethics, legal liability, responsibilities, audit evidence, and planning. Internal controls and risks are also introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 3010

ACC 4120
Auditing, Systems, and Controls II
3

Applies the audit process to various transaction cycles. This course introduces the systems of controls and related analytic flow charting for each of the transaction cycles, as well as the test of controls and the substantive tests for each cycle. This course is a continuation of Auditing, Systems, and Controls I.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 4110

ACC 4310
Governmental Accounting
3

Addresses the fundamental principles of accounting for governmental units, colleges, hospitals, voluntary health and welfare organizations, and other non-profit organizations. Students will compare and contrast non-profit accounting processes with those of for-profit enterprises by evaluating the differing regulations for recording transactions, financial reporting, and revenue recognition as well as funding options and budgeting.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 3010

ACC 4410
Advanced Accounting
3

Provides students with the knowledge and skills necessary to perform accounting functions related to the acquisition of a business, consolidated financial statements, and disclosure requirements for industry segments.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 3010

ACC 4710
Forensic Accounting
3

Studies financial fraud and the methods of fraud detection, investigation, and prevention. THIS COURSE DESCRIPTION IS NOT COMPLETE

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 3010

ACC 4810
Accounting Elective

ACC 4850
Accounting Elective

AMT 2050
Principles of Industrial Safety, Health, and Environment
3

Provides awareness of industrial safety and occupational health practices. Delivers hands-on learning associated with PPE, BBS, MSDS and fire suppression resources. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AMT 2050L

AMT 2150
Fundamentals of Industrial Management
3

Provides awareness of industrial management and occupational leadership practices. Delivers hands-on learning associated with decision making, communication, critical thinking, problem solving and production operations management techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
AMT 2050, CAD 1410

AMT 2410
Introduction to Composites Technology
3

Covers the fundamental science and technology of composite materials. The course investigates and analyzes the primary processes and test methods associated with composite materials. This lab based class embeds lecture and material theory with the hands-on dimension of learning.

Prerequisite(s):
AMT 2050

Corequisite(s):
CAD 1410

AMT 2450
Advanced Composites Technology
3

Covers the advanced safety, science, technology and quality control of composite materials. The course investigates and analyzes the intermediate and advanced processes and test methods associated with composite materials. Field based industry visits augment the theory, lecture and lab. This lab based class embeds lecture and material theory with the hands-on dimension of learning.

Prerequisite(s):
AMT 2410

AST 1110
Engine Operation and Service
3

Deals with the theory of operation for the gasoline internal combustion engine. Focuses on upper engine and timing components along with their operations. Disassembly and assembly, part inspection, use of manuals, and repair procedures will be applied. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 1110L

AST 1210
Steering and Suspension
3

Focuses on the design and operation of automotive steering and suspension systems. Topics include front and rear alignment, component identification and repair, tire wear patterns, use of service information and equipment. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A4 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 1210L

AST 1310
Brakes and Braking Systems
3

Focuses on the design and operation of automotive brake systems. Topics include diagnosis and repair of traditional, anti-lock brake, and traction control systems. Students will acquire knowledge of hydraulic systems, disc/drum machining, and scan tool usage. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A5 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 1310L

AST 1410
Electrical Systems
3

Focuses on the introduction to automotive electrical systems which includes basic theories, electrical components, wiring diagrams, and starting and charging systems. This course also focuses on the use of test equipment such as digital multimeters, test lights and jumper wires used to diagnose basic electrical faults. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 1410L

AST 1510
Ignition and Fuel Systems
3

Focuses on an introduction to engine fault diagnosis and adjustment or repair. Computerized engine controls are reviewed as are ignition systems, fuel/air systems, and exhaust systems. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 1510L

AST 2010
Professional Career Exploration Experience
1

Provies students with an opportunity to observe auto service careers, spanning a wide variety of applications in Michigan, and introduces them to NATEF/ASE workplace employability skills.

AST 2110
Engine Assembly and Components
3

Studies disassembly and assembly of the internal combustion engine. Topics include part inspection, identification and use of repair procedures. Precision measuring equipment will be applied to upper and lower engine components. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A1 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 2110L

AST 2250
Manual Transmission/Transfer Case and Axles
3

Investigates the manual drive train and major components. Examines transmissions, drive shafts, differentials, and drive axles. Discusses diagnosis and troubleshooting. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A3 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 2250L

AST 2410
Electrical Operations and Systems Testing
3

Focuses on air bag systems, electronic steering systems, programing computers, communication networks, advanced scan tool usage, and safety procedures required to diagnose and service these areas. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A6 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 2410L

AST 2710
Heating and Air Conditioning
3

Addresses automotive heating and air conditioning system theories, troubleshooting, and servicing. Proper refrigerant recovery, recycling, storage, and use of recharging equipment will also be covered. Students will be made aware of recent environmental concerns relevant to coolant and refrigeration. In addition, basic shop safety and safe use of recycling equipment will be discussed. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE A7 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
AST 2710L

AST 2810
Powertrain/Noise and Vibration
3

Investigates the common causes of noise and vibration through all aspects of the vehicle. Areas of focus are drive line, bushings, mounts, seals, noise due to collision damage, and bearings. Students will perform diagnoses and repair of drive line problems due to worn and misaligned components. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

BAK 1010
Baking Science
1

Teaches students the basic scientific and chemical principles involved in pastry and baking. This is a lecture only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

BAK 1110
Baking Fundamentals
4

Introduces students to the basic principles of baking. Through hands-on experience students learn the identification of bakery tools and equipment, proper weighing and scaling of ingredients, and basic mixing methods. Students will learn to prepare basic breads, doughs, and starters along with choux products and pies. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
CUL 1310

BAK 1210
Nutritional Baking
4

Learn important and current trends in nutritional baking, as well as hand crafted artisanal baking. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

BAK 1310
Classic Pastry Fundamentals
4

Acquire knowledge of important and current trends in restaurant and a la minute style desserts and petite fours. Content will include traditional and contemporary plated desserts and peiti fours. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

BAK 1410
Petit Fours and Plated Desserts
4

Acquire knowledge of important and current trends in restaurant and a la minute style desserts and petite fours. Content will include traditional and contemporary plated desserts and peiti fours. This is a lab only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
BAK 1310

BAK 1510
Chocolate and confections
4

Provides students the hands-on experience in the production and preparation of chocolate and sugar confections. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

BAK 1610
Showpiece and Specialty Cake Design
4

Expands on the concepts and skills from classical pastry fundamentals, with a continuation of techniques used for further applications. Students will focus on the design and assembly of wedding cakes and special occasion cakes as well as the building methods and techniques used for showpieces. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
BAK 1510

BAK 1710
Cafe and Bakery Operations
4

Prepares the students for the innovation, creativity, speed, and multi-tasking abilities required in today's cafe operations. The lab format for this course will offer students a real working kitchen environment in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's student-run cafe. An extensive range of advanced techniques, ingredients, and recipes illustrate the complex theories and applications. Upon completing this course, students will have achieved a high standard of quality and detail in a cafe retail experience. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
BAK 1310

BUS 2110
Business Analytics
3

Introduces the data analysis process and the role of business decision making. Explores qualitative and quantitative data, data vs. information, data research, relevance, validity, business intelligence tools, ethical and legal implications of data analysis, data integrity, primary and secondary data, MAIP (Measurement Analysis, Interpretation Presentation) and ethical and legal implications of data analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010, MTH 1050 or ENG 1010, MGT 1010, MTH 1110

BUS 2910
Fundamentals of Project Management
3

Provides the basic fundamental knowledge to understand the approach to the management of projects. The primary objectives are to empower students with the vocabulary, knowledge competencies and basic performance competencies necessary to instinctively understand and function at a high level in their project supporting roles. This course will also prepare them to organize and execute their own day-to-day work in a more efficient manner using modern project management concepts and methods. Students will learn and utilize Microsoft Project throughout the course.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 1010

BUS 3110
Accounting for Managers
4

Focuses on basic accounting concepts and the interpretation and utilization of accounting information. Emphasis is placed on analysis of financial statements and their use in managerial decision making.

BUS 3710
Financial Analysis and Applications
4

Examines the fundamentals of corporate financial management through the use of accounting information. Specific topics include: financial statement analysis, valuation of and discounted cash flows involving the time value of money, valuation and structure of debt and equity capital both long- and short-term, working capital management, capital budgeting, and the risk-return relationship. All topics covered include the application and ethical implication on the decision-making role of financial managers in business organizations.

BUS 4010
International Business
4

Analyzes the firm as it expands globally. Emphasis is placed on the understanding and utilization of diversity and ethics in the development, operation and international expansion of the firm. Multicultural work environments, employment and labor issues, domestic and international law, global marketing, trade and finance will be examined. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree programs.

BUS 4110
Human Resources and Employment Law
4

Provides an introduction to employment law and labor law for a non-legal professional in human resource management and labor relations. An emphasis will be placed on employment, labor, and social issues in the work environment. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Leadership program.

BUS 4210
Marketing Management
4

Covers the role of the marketing function in organizational operations with an emphasis on product/service promotion, placement, and pricing. Various marketing strategies will be evaluated. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree program.

BUS 4310
Management Strategy
4

Focuses on the strategy function of senior management and the establishment of the organizational mission, strategy, goals, objectives and plan of implementation and evaluation. This course is exclusive to the Accelerated Bachelor of Business Administration degree program.

BUS 4410
Developing Negotiation Skills
3

Develops students understanding of the principles, strategies, and tactics of effective negotiation and professional relationship management. In addition students will also increase their awareness and understanding of ethical principles and stakeholder considerations that influence the choices offered and made in transactions and relationships. Students will learn to identify and assess the variables in negotiations, develop sound negotiation planning techniques, and develop an understanding of various strategies and tactics to use in ethically resolve conflicts, transactional and interpersonal differences. Learn how to use that knowledge to execute effective dispute resolutions, and improved competence to manage professional relationships.

BUS 5710
Compensation and Benefits
3

Examines the process and strategy of compensation management. Students will explore issues involving the nexus of compensation and benefits, and reward and incentive strategies within the larger scope of organizational effectiveness.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 5720

BUS 5720
Human Resource Management
3

Evaluates a variety of human resource issues facing corporations and businesses today. These include employee development, performance appraisal systems, job design, hiring and dismissal processes, career management strategies, legal issues, morale monitoring, domestic and global labor market problems, as well as how cultural and economic factors influence the effectiveness of human resource management.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510 or BUS 6780

BUS 5730
Labor Relations and Conflict Resolution
3

Provides students the opportunity to analyze industrial relations by examining the role of labor unions in American life and worldwide. The course will address the legal and business environment for collective bargaining and conflict resolution among both union and at-will employees. It will also address the impact of globalization and international trade agreements on the future growth of organized labor.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 5720

BUS 5760
Employee Staffing and Development
3

Focuses on strategic decisions regarding the staffing and employee development functions of a corporation. Emphasis will be placed on needs analysis techniques for staffing and training, legal and ethical issues with staffing, design and implementation of training programs, and the development of professional and career development programs. A key focus will be the development of an organization that nurtures leaders who can drive change.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 5720

BUS 6150
Human Behavior Management of Organizations
3

Provides students with an understanding of individuals, groups, and organizations as a whole. This course considers such topics as alignment of people within an organization, as well as techniques for these individuals to manage and lead more effectively. This course will also discuss how technology, the Internet, globalism, and virtual teaming are impacting the work environment today.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 6200
Cloud Security Risk Management Policy and Methods Review
3

Reviews and analyzes the compliance implications of selected cloud security policies and methods with a specific focus on the NIST Risk Management Framework.

Prerequisite(s):
CGS 5010

BUS 6210
Cloud Security Risk Management Methodology
3

Applies the NIST Risk Management Framework as students complete project deliverables and communicate project results, integrating enterprise and cloud system risk management. In addition, students develop in-depth analytic competencies by applying the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) of the Certified Authorization Professional (CAP) to relevant risk management problems.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6200

BUS 6220
Cloud Security Risk Management Practicum I
3

Focuses on the integrated enterprise/cloud system, in this virtual practicum/internship, students develop the capability to support the conducting of an assessment and authorization project requiring the use of security controls, students then document results.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6210

BUS 6230
Cloud Security Risk Management Practicum II
3

Continues in the virtual practicum internship, focusing on the integrated enterprise/cloud system, students develop the capability to provide recommendations based on the results of an assessment and authorization project which requires the use of security controls.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6220

BUS 6240
Cloud Security Vulnerability Management
3

Assess and analyze enterprise/cloud system vulnerabilities using COTS tools; conduct controlled exploitation; produce and communicate an effective remediation plan through the in-depth application of the Common Body of Knowledge (CBK) for the Certified Ethical Hacker (CEH) certification.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6230

BUS 6300
Accounting for the Contemporary Manager
3

Focuses on the use of financial and managerial accounting information for decision-making purposes. Topics include accounting concepts, accounting systems, preparing financial statements, product costing and overhead allocation, variance analysis, budgeting, and responsibility accounting. How these topics should be applied in information based decision making is emphasized. Case analysis is used to enhance student learning of key accounting concepts.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 6310
Taxation
3

Focuses on special studies related to tax problems of individuals, partnerships, fiduciaries, and corporations. Emphasis is on federal taxation of corporations, trusts, and estates. Specific use of the Tax Code and the Internal Revenue Service Regulations will be an integral part of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6300

BUS 6340
Non-Profit Accounting
3

Focuses on comprehensive study of the recoding of transactions by government units and the preparation of financial statements by fund entities. City government is the basic unit of study; however, school districts, universities, and hospitals are covered to illustrate the similarity in accounting for all not-for-profit entities.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6300

BUS 6350
Global Accounting
3

Explores the impact of the cultural, social, legal, political, and economic conditions that shape the national accounting standard-setting process of different countries. It focuses on accounting practices of vital countries with diverse cultures and legal environments.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6300

BUS 6400
The Financial Environment
3

Provides a general understanding of corporate financial management and financial accounting, including the introduction of key concepts in the field of finance and the environment in which they are applied. Students learn how to gauge the financial health of their company and to measure and understand financial return in relation to risk. Capital budgeting and management of working capital are also discussed. The course emphasis is on the familiarization of the student with the financial impact of decision making in the corporate environment.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 6410
Money and Banking
3

Provides students the opportunity to learn and discuss the topics of money, money markets, money market participants, monetary policies and its effects, and regulation of money markets, in addition to examining banks, banking services, and the banking industry. The dynamic nature of the banking industry will be examined, highlighting recent changes and expected future developments. Students will also learn to identify and manage financial risks. Students will write a project report on how to improve some banking practices or business practices related to banking or money management.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6400

BUS 6420
Financial Accounting
3

Emphasis is on understanding and preparing financial accounting statements on past performance and projected future performance of organizations. Students will also learn to evaluate and efficiently use financial accounting statements to identify business problems and profit from business strengths. Topics include FASB's conceptual framework, GAAP, measuring income, recording transactions, accounting for sales, inventories and cost of goods sold, long-lived assets and depreciation, liabilities and interest, valuation and accounting for bonds and leases, stockholder's equity, statement of cash flows, accounting differences, and the International Accounting Standards.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6300

BUS 6430
International Business Finance
3

Introduces students to international financial capital flows in the global economy, focusing on how to financially manage businesses that compete internationally. The costs and benefits of international business financing are analyzed, from both short-term and long-term perspectives, considering both direct and indirect effects. Business strategies for managing financial risks are examined, including foreign exchange risk, interest rate risk, and default risk. Students will each complete a graduate research paper using some principles of international business finance to explain, evaluate, and recommend improvements in a firm’s business practices.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6400

BUS 6450
Public Finance
3

Teaches students to understand and manage responsible budgeting practices at various levels of government -- local, state, and national. Students will learn to understand and develop a budget of tax revenue income, government spending, and transfers to achieve policy makers' financial objectives for their constituents. This course explores the fiscal policy issues of taxes, transfer programs, government spending, budget deficits, public debt, and budget planning. Students will prepare a project report explaining, evaluating, and recommending improvements in some government practices or business practices using some of the principles of public finance.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6400

BUS 6500
The Economic Environment
3

Provides students with an integrated understanding of the concepts of economics. The emphasis is on the application of economics and uses actual economic events to encourage the study of the principles of economics and to show how these concepts can help students understand the complex and dynamic American economy.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 6600
The Marketing Environment
3

Concentrates on the marketing concept and its impact on the strategic decision-making process of the firm. This course emphasizes planning and managing marketing activities of multi-product firms and provides an understanding of the fundamental issues which influence marketing decisions. The specifics of implementing a marketing plan are discussed. In addition, the effects of a diverse global marketplace and sources of marketing research are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 6780
Research and Statistics for Managers
3

Emphasizes the use of data collection and analysis in business environments to facilitate decision making. Research designs will be addressed so that students can ask and answer specific questions. Students will learn to properly use basic descriptive and inferential statistics. This course will offer an applications-oriented perspective to conducting and critically evaluating primary research.

Prerequisite(s):
CGS 5010

BUS 6850
Dynamics of Leadership
3

Examines a broad spectrum of leadership issues. These include development, change, diversity, traits, types, attributes, and ethical climate. This course also examines models and theories, the leader/follower relationship, application in the organization and current issues.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6150

BUS 6880
Profiles in Leadership
3

Analyses the leadership styles of past and present senior industry executives. It also addresses a number of issues that directly affect senior leadership. These include governing boards, succession, strategic planning, change and crisis management, executive communication, delegation and time management.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6150

BUS 6890
Team Leadership and Group Dynamics
3

Focuses on improving small group performance through effective team leadership and group dynamics. Students examine organizational teams and learn team effectiveness skills while being members of virtual teams. Students also learn to function productively in a group environment. Team performance is studied, and various reasons for team failure are explored. Team leadership is stressed throughout the course, and problems that may occur within teams are addressed. Effective teams are critical for many organizations to move forward. This course helps students enhance skills as both team leaders and participants.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6150

BUS 6900
Strategy in a Global Environment
3

Provides the capstone course for the MBA program. It builds upon and integrates the theories, skills, and knowledge from previous courses. Students have the opportunity to make strategic decisions that affect performance and long-term viability of business enterprises. Students will analyze the business strategies of current public corporations. Students will also complete a decision-making business simulation.

Prerequisite(s):
All MBA business requirement and major requirement courses

BUS 7500
Healthcare Programs and Policies
3

Provides an overview of healthcare policy making, including an understanding of healthcare reform and national healthcare programs, such as Medicare. Students will study their role in healthcare policy formulation, implementation, and modification, while developing competence in the policymaking process through policy analysis, investigation of current and future healthcare trends, and making recommendations to address these trends.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 7520
Healthcare Administration
3

Provides a comprehensive study of managerial problem solving and decision making techniques, organizational design, human resources management, the healthcare system, quality improvement, health informatics, organizational change and strategic planning.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 7530
Quality Management in Healthcare Organizations
3

Integrates the theories, skills, and knowledge pertaining to quality assessment and implementation in health care organizations. It will provide students the tools to analyze the parameters and guidelines for assessing, maintaining and improving quality in healthcare organizations. This is an elective course within the Baker College MBA program, but primarily designed for those in the healthcare administration concentration.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 7580
Health Law and Ethics
3

Explores various legal and ethical issues relevant to the healthcare field. Topics include medical malpractice, informed consent, professional liability, patients' rights, employee rights and responsibilities, and medical ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780

BUS 7590
Healthcare Finance
3

Provides a deeper understanding of financial concepts applied to the healthcare field. Topics include financial statement analysis, principles of reimbursement, cost concepts and decision making, financial forecasting, budgeting techniques, capital project analysis, and strategic financial planning within the healthcare industry.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510 or BUS 6780

BUS 8000
The Scholar Practitioner
3

Provides an orientation to the DBA program by reviewing the curriculum, the dissertation, and the expectations for doctoral study. Explores the nature of scholarly inquiry and scientific method, the connections between theory and practice, and the importance of these considerations in conducting research for practical application. Identifies information resources available to a doctoral student at Baker College and develops proficiency at using them. Uses readings, assessment tools, experiential exercises, and reflection on past and current experiences so that students can develop a deeper understanding of the extent of their knowledge of business and management, learning styles and skills, and professional strengths and weaknesses. Explores reasons to seek a doctorate and supports the development of an Autobiographical Learning Plan, which includes a Program of Study highlighting professional and academic goals for the program.

BUS 8010
Doctoral Writing and Literature Review
3

Provides practical guidance on how to critically read scholarly articles, how to formulate researchable questions, and how to develop and maintain a reading asset library of annotations to be used throughout the program. Introduces scholarly writing and the standards used to assess it. Identifies the need for information, how to find it, evaluate its accuracy, significance, and relevance to research. Prepares students for the first year curriculum and the Comprehensive Essay by writing a scholarly literature review on a possible topic of interest for their dissertation.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8000

BUS 8100
Leading 21st Century Organizations
3

Explores today's complex, world-wide environment that necessitates teamwork and collaboration to sustain a competitive advantage. Students will examine practices required to lead organizations with highly diverse workforces distributed across international, cultural, and regional boundaries. Students will systematically investigate the latest ideas emerging from both the world of practice and leadership research to identify best practices in the ever changing and dynamic workplace of the 21st Century.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8110
Managing in a World-Wide Context
3

Addresses how regardless of whether you work in a large or small company, a governmental agency, a nonprofit or community-based organization, or run your own small business, you must function in a new and highly interconnected world-wide context. This course explores this new environment from multiple perspectives. Students will examine cultural, environmental, ethical, political, and legal differences across different regions of the world. Attention is focused on how to manage and lead across boundaries to meet the challenges of this new context. Theories of international management, international human resource management, and international finance and accounting are considered as is the role of information technology in creating greater access to the world-wide economy.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8120
Knowledge Management and Information Systems
3

Addresses the importance of getting the right knowledge to the right individuals at the right time to make the best possible decisions – and drive to action. The unique strength of this course is the effective combination of the field of Knowledge Management (KM) with Information Systems (IS) to help meet these challenges. Students will learn how knowledge is created, collected, organized, stored, retrieved, disseminated, and applied across organizations; and how technology is used to support evidence-based decisions. This course builds on the theories of Knowledge Management, Information Systems, and Information Technology along with supporting theories: Information Theory, Communications Theory, Leadership Theory, Human Behavior Theory, and Organizational Change Theory. The course includes the development of a Final Paper where these concepts are applied to address the needs of an actual organization.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8130
Quality Improvement and Organizational Change
3

Explores the concepts of quality improvement and organizational change to achieve sustained organizational excellence. These concepts are not new. What is important is how to effectively integrate these concepts to meet the needs of all types of organizations: Private, non-profit, and government. Students will study the history of these concepts and examine major quality/change initiatives including: Total quality, ISO 9000, Malcolm Baldrige Performance Excellence, leadership, benchmarking, Six Sigma, statistical thinking, and other leading initiatives. The course includes the development of a Final Paper where these concepts are applied to address the needs of an actual organization.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8140
Corporate and Personal Ethics
3

Reviews how socially responsible and innovative corporate governance is required to meet the challenges of global warming, the stewardship of scarce resources, and the distribution of income among various stakeholders. Students will examine how ethical principles can be integrated into corporate strategies. The responsibility to a wide array of stakeholders is examined as well as factors that should be considered in guiding a company's philanthropic, community development and sustainable business practices. Students will also focus on individual ethics and how managers and leaders can build congruency between their values and actions. Finally, students will examine best practices in corporate social innovation by such firms as Ben and Jerry's, KLD, Plug Power, PwC, UN Global Compact, and Schlumberger SEED.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8200
Professional Residency
2

Requires students to attend at least one professional conference in the first or second year. The approved conferences will be identified and program faculty will also attend. The DBA program will host a seminar at these events. A list of approved conferences will be developed by the faculty each year. Students will be required to document attendance and write a short paper describing what was learned at the conference.Requires students to attend at least one professional conference in the first or second year. The approved conferences will be identified and program faculty will also attend. The DBA program will host a seminar at these events. A list of approved conferences will be developed by the faculty each year. Students will be required to document attendance and write a short paper describing what was learned at the conference.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010

BUS 8400
Introduction to Research Methods and Designs
3

Defines the purpose of dissertation studies; produces a clear statement of the research problem based on a detailed review of the literature, and produces research questions to be answered or hypotheses to be tested. Students will include these in a dissertation prospectus, which can be used to select members for their dissertation committee.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8920

BUS 8410
Defining the Dissertation Resear ch Problem and Research Question
3

Introduces students to an array of quantitative and qualitative research methods and designs and their appropriate application in empirical research. Topics related to quantitative research include measurement, sampling, hypothesis testing, variables, validity, reliability, and causation. Different quantitative research designs will be covered including experimental and quasi-experimental, survey, field, designs utilizing existing data, and evaluation research. Topics related to qualitative research will also be covered including interviewing, coding, nonrandom sampling, quality of evidence (credibility and dependability). Qualitative designs covered include case study, phenomenological, and grounded theory. The course will serve as a refresher on basic statistical concepts, including descriptive and inferential statistics, and the appropriate use of parametric and nonparametric procedures. Ethics involved in research are covered including the protection of human subjects as required by the Baker College Institutional Review Board (IRB).

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8400

BUS 8600
Doctoral Specialization Seminar I
3

Focuses on the first of three doctoral seminars taken in series and focused on your specialization. The primary focus of these three seminars is the successful completion of your Qualifying Paper, and a draft of your dissertation proposal, which is Chapter I, Chapter II, and Chapter III of the dissertation. In this initial doctoral seminar, you will complete Chapter I Introduction and Statement of Problem. Specifically, you will investigate a topic of your choice within your selected field of study. Chapter I includes a definition of the research problem, identification of the research questions, a description of the purpose of the study, and an explanation about its significance. A brief summary of the literature review as well as a description of the research methodology, identification of relevant terminology, and limitations will be included. The seminar will include the development of a bibliography of major theorists or theories in the field of study.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8410

BUS 8700
Doctoral Specialization Seminar II
3

Focuses on the completion of Chapter II or Literature Review. Specifically, you will expound on your research problem by analyzing, comparing, and contrasting major theories relevant to your chosen topic. You will synthesize these concepts to develop a literature review, which provides a connection between the research problem and the research questions. Your Qualifying Paper is completed in this seminar.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8600

BUS 8800
Doctoral Specialization Seminar III
3

Supports the student’s selection of an appropriate design and methodology based on his or her research problem and a comprehensive review of the research design literature. Provides guidance in coordination with the student’s dissertation chair for the development of Chapter 3 Methodology of the dissertation.

Corequisite(s):
BUS 8930

BUS 8920
Comprehensive Essay
3

Prepares students to complete the Comprehensive Essay at the end of the first year after the completion of BUS801, BUS810, BUS811, BUS813, BUS890, and BUS891. It provides evidence that the student has mastered foundational theories and concepts in the field of business administration, have an interdisciplinary understanding of the complex nature of business problems, and is able to synthesize and analyze scholarly research publications. The essay requires students to summarize the annotations collected in the Reading Asset Library. The annotations are submitted with the essay.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8010, BUS 8100, BUS 8110, BUS 8120, BUS 8130, BUS 8140

BUS 8930
Qualifying Paper
3

Allows students to prepare a scholarly paper suitable for publication, in order to qualify for the dissertation phase of the DBA program. Normally this occurs at the end of the second year after all your coursework in the program has been completed except for BUS814 Corporate and Personal Ethics and all that remains is the dissertation. The purpose of the paper is to demonstrate mastery of scholarly writing, research methodology, and a depth of knowledge in a field covered by the program. It will provide evidence that the student is able to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, and be able to communicate management and business theories, research findings, and best practices through scholarly publication.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8700

BUS 8940
Dissertation Proposal I
2

Allows students to work toward the completion of their dissertation proposal with the support of their chair and committee. The final dissertation is composed of five chapters (Chapter I Introduction and Statement of the Problem; Chapter II Literature Review; Chapter III Methodology; Chapter IV Results; and Chapter V. Conclusions and Recommendations). The proposal is composed of the first three chapters and must be approved before data can be collected and analyzed.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8930

BUS 8950
Dissertation Proposal II
2

Allows students to complete their dissertation proposal with the support of their chair and committee. The final dissertation is composed of five chapters (Chapter I Introduction and Statement of the Problem; Chapter II Literature Review; Chapter III Methodology; Chapter IV Results; and Chapter V. Conclusions and Recommendations). The proposal is composed of the first three chapters and must be approved before data can be collected and analyzed. The proposal oral must be successfully completed to pass the course.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8940

BUS 8960
Dissertation I
2

Allows students to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8950

BUS 8970
Dissertation II
2

Allows students to continue to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Corequisite(s):
BUS 8960

BUS 8980
Dissertation III
2

Allows students to continue to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8970

BUS 8990
Dissertation IV
2

Allows students to continue to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Corequisite(s):
BUS 8980

BUS 9000
Dissertation V
2

Allows students to continue to work toward the completion of their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 8990

BUS 9010
Dissertation VI
2

Allows students to successfully complete their dissertation with the support of their chair and committee. A successfully completed dissertation provides evidence that you have the ability to plan, execute, and apply scholarly research, have mastered foundational theories and concepts, and have an in-depth knowledge of theory and practice in one area of specialization. It is also evidence that you are able to conceptualize and carry out research and to communicate the results of that research in a coherent document, which addresses an important problem and makes a significant contribution to the profession's theory or practice. The dissertation must be successfully completed and submitted to UMI to pass the course.

Corequisite(s):
BUS 9000

CAD 1110
Introduction to Computer Aided Design (CAD)
3

Foundation course for the fundamentals of two and three dimensional computer aided design. Focuses on the mechanics of creating drawings and models, and geospatial thinking. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 1110L

CAD 1410
Introduction to Industrial Materials and Processes
3

Manufacturing processes and the full scope of manufacturing are explored. Different processes, materials, cost and labor concerns are also discussed. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 1410L

CAD 2150
Statics and Strength of Materials
3

Uses trigonometry to teach the fundamentals of statics and solid mechanics. Physical experiments and CAD modeling are used to give a broad base understanding of loading and component requirements.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310, SCI 2150

CAD 2260
Unigraphics
3

Teaches the fundamentals of parametric modeling, using sketches, drawings or physical objects. Design intent, manufacturing method and material are all stressed as inputs into the design. Drawings and assemblies are introduced. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 1110 or EGR 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2260L

CAD 2270
Unigraphics Intermediate
3

Assemblies and drawings are fully explored for a variety of manufacturing applications. Uses projects and large assemblies to teach complex modeling techniques. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2260

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2270L

CAD 2280
Unigraphics Advanced
3

Component validation techniques including interference analysis, finite element analysis and Product Lifecycle Management are taught. Design intent is stressed through component studies, individual projects and team projects. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2270

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2280L

CAD 2310
Pro/ENGINEER
3

Teaches the fundamentals of parametric modeling, using sketches, drawings or physical objects. Design intent, manufacturing method and material are all stressed as inputs into the design. Drawings and assemblies are introduced. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 1110 or EGR 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2310L

CAD 2320
Pro/ENGINEER Intermediate
3

Assemblies and drawings are fully explored for a variety of manufacturing applications. Uses projects and large assemblies to teach complex modeling techniques. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2320L

CAD 2330
Pro/ENGINEER Advanced
3

Component validation techniques including interference analysis, finite element analysis and Product Lifecycle Management are taught. Design intent is stressed through component studies, individual projects and team projects. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2320

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2330L

CAD 2360
SolidWorks
3

Teaches the fundamentals of parametric modeling, using sketches, drawings or physical objects. Design intent, manufacturing method and material are all stressed as inputs into the design. Drawings and assemblies are introduced. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 1110 or EGR 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2360L

CAD 2370
SolidWorks Intermediate
3

Assemblies and drawings are fully explored for a variety of manufacturing applications. Uses projects and large assemblies to teach complex modeling techniques. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2360

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2370L

CAD 2380
SolidWorks Advanced
3

Component validation techniques including interference analysis, finite element analysis and Product Lifecycle Management are taught. Design intent is stressed through component studies, individual projects and team projects. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CAD 2370

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAD 2380L

CAS 1010
Noninvasive Cardiology
4

Provides an overview of non-invasive cardiac testing including EKG technology, use of the EKG machine and patient hook-up. EKG focus is on understanding and interpreting basic cardiac arrhythmias including sinus, atrial, junctional, and ventricular with an introduction to infarction and the 12-lead EKG. Additional topics include stress testing, blood pressure, auscultation, cardiac embryology, pacemakers and basic hemodynamics. Must complete with a B- or better.

CAS 1210
Introduction to Echocardiography
4

Provides an introduction to cardiac diseases, the field and history of cardiac sonography, including m-mode, 2D and cardiac Doppler. Basic machine controls, image acquisition, and basic physics principles will be covered. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CAS 1010

CAS 2010
Cross Sectional Sonography
3

Presents information to students relative to both the normal body structure and the pathologic changes seen in the cardiac ultrasound imaging planes. This course will utilize textbook material, slides, scan planes, and various echo modes specific to the echocardiographic exam. Must complete with a B- or better.

CAS 2050
Clinical Affiliation I
6

Provides an opportunity for learning basic skills and the application of previous coursework within the cardiac echo setting. This rotation will focus on non-invasive testing procedures and the performance of a basic echo protocol. This course will require students to observe and practice while under supervision. Additional lab time is required for students to share clinical experiences and perform hands-on skills with other students. This is a 16 week clinical experience. 385 hours of clinical experience and 75 lab hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

CAS 2110
Cardiac Valve Disease in Sonography
3

Provides an in-depth study of human anatomy and physiology as it related to ultrasound and cardiovascular disease with a focus on valvular disease and the aorta. Must complete with a B- or better.

CAS 2210
Cardiac Ventricular Disease in Sonography
3

Provides an in-depth study of human physiology as it related to ultrasound cardiovascular disease with a focus on pericardial and ventricular disease. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CAS 2110

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAS 2310, CAS 2310L, CAS 2610

CAS 2310
Clinical Affiliation II
6

Provides a continued opportunity to enhance basic scanning skills and application of ongoing coursework within the cardiac echo setting. Requires students to observe and practice while under supervision. Additional lab time is required for students to share clinical experiences and perform hands-on skills with other students. This second echo rotation will focus on advanced skills and performing complete echo studies, including pathology protocols. This 16 week clinical experience. 385 hours of clinical experience and 75 lab hours are required. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
CAS 2050

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAS 2310, CAS 2310L, CAS 2610

CAS 2610
Advanced Disease and Technologies
3

Focuses on advanced cardiac ultrasound, congenital heart disease and provides an introduction to new technologies in the profession, including 3D ultrasound, contrast, stress echo and tissue Doppler technology. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CAS 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
CAS 2210, CAS 2310, CAS 2310L

CE 2110
Surveying
2

Introduces students to the plane surveying theory of measurements; use of surveying equipment; field and office work for boundary surveys and topographic mapping. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 1050

Concurrent requisite(s):
CE 2110L

CE 2510
Professional Practice
1

Discusses professional practice aspects for civil and environmental engineers including design consequences, engineering ethics, legal considerations, professional licensure, government regulations, consulting work requirements, leadership and management issues.

Corequisite(s):
CE 2110

CE 2610
Introduction to Environmental Engineering
3

Introduces students to environmental systems focusing on soil, water and air; analysis of environmental issues including various pollution sources and contaminants and their health risks; development of engineering solutions to environmental problems; government legislation and regulations for water and air quality control.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 2110, ME 2210

CE 3110
Traffic Engineering
3

Describes basic traffic characteristics; highway capacity analysis; geometric design of highways; route location, traffic operations, and signalized intersection design.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 2110, EGR 1050

CE 3210
Structural Analysis I
3

Presents the analysis of statically determinate structures including beams, frames, trusses, and arches for the effects of dead, live, moving, and wind loads.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3210

CE 3350
Fluid Mechanics
3

Introduces students to the mechanics of fluids. This course includes fluid properties, kinematics, fluid statics, Bernoulli equation, control volume and differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, and fluid/flow phenomena.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, MTH 3550

CE 3410
Soils Mechanics
4

Introduces students to properties and engineering behavior of soil as a native earth material, an engineering material, and an environmental medium subject to flux and transport of liquids, gases, and contaminants; understanding of elementary physical, chemical, and biological phenomena as such phenomena influence the engineering behavior of soils. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3210

Concurrent requisite(s):
CE 3410L

CE 4220
Structural Analysis II
3

Continues discussion of structural analysis topics with the analysis of statically indeterminate structures; methods of consistent deformations, elastic energy, virtual work, slope deflection, moment distribution, and matrix formulations.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3210

CE 4250
Reinforced Concrete Design
3

Presents working stress and ultimate strength theories as applied to concrete beams (reinforced and pre-stressed), columns, slabs, and footings; experimental data and current design specifications. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

Concurrent requisite(s):
CE 4250L

CE 4270
Steel Design
3

Presents analysis and design of elements of steel structures, elastic and plastic design. Critical comparison of specifications with theory.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4310
Water Resources Engineering
4

Discusses collection and management of water as a natural resource; atmospheric processes; watershed hydrology and streamflow; subsurface water; ground water engineering; storm water management; river basin management; environmental regulation and protection.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350

CE 4710
Design of Bridges
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4730
Pre-Stressed Concrete Design
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4750
Structural Timber Design
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4770
Pavement Design
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

Concurrent requisite(s):
CE 4770L

CE 4790
Geometric Design of Highways and Airports
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4830
Transportation Engineering
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 4220

CE 4850
Hydrology
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350

CE 4870
Hydraulics
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350

CE 4890
Water Treatment Principles
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 2610

CE 4970
Wastewater Collection Systems
3

Prerequisite(s):
CE 2610

CE 4990
Solid Waste Principles
3

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4320

CER CNC
Earned CER CNC degree at Baker College or transfer
27

CER WELD
Earned CER WELD degree at Baker College or transfer
27

CGS 5010
Graduate Seminar
2

Orients graduate students to the standards and expectations of the College, including topics such as policies and procedures, the online learning environment and expectations, academic integrity, APA writing requirements, library resources, and professional standards.

CIS 1110
Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I and II
3

Provides an introduction to computer operating systems and maintenance concepts. Students will study the Microsoft Windows family of operating systems and will receive a brief introduction to Linux. This course will assist students in their preparation for the CompTIA A+ Essentials Exam. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CIS 1110L

CIS 1010
Introduction to Computer Applications
3

Introduces students to modern office software and applications. Applications presented include word processing, spreadsheets, database, and presentation software.

CIS 1030
Word Processing
1

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

CIS 1050
Electronic Spreadsheets
1

Introduces the use of Excel spreadsheets for accounting applications, worksheets, and organizing various documents used in preparing various accounting financial information documents and reports.

CIS 1110
Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I and II
3

Provides an introduction to computer operating systems and maintenance concepts. Students will study the Microsoft Windows family of operating systems and will receive a brief introduction to Linux. This course will assist students in their preparation for the CompTIA A+ Essentials Exam. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CIS 1110L

CIS 1110L
Computer Operating Systems and Maintenance I and II
3

Provides an introduction to computer operating systems and maintenance concepts. Students will study the Microsoft Windows family of operating systems and will receive a brief introduction to Linux. This course will assist students in their preparation for the CompTIA A+ Essentials Exam. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CIS 1110

CIS 1150
iSeries CL and File Design
3

Introduces students to the fundamentals of computer operations, control language, and file design in the iSeries environment.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1010 or NET 1010

CIS 1310
RPG IV
3

Introduces program design and development using the RPG IV language. Students will analyze business problems and prepare program definitions as a basis for computerized solutions to those problems. Students interested in accounting applications are encouraged to choose this language option.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1150

CIS 2210
Database Management and Design
3

Introduces students to the underlying principles of information and database structure in electronic database management systems. Students will be introduced to types of information, table structure, features of a relational database, basic concepts of database design and normalization, and basic overviews of the roles of database administrators and professionals. Students will also be introduced to introductory SQL commands using a command line and existing databases. Expands on the concepts learned in the introductory course in database creation by introducing students to higher levels of database development and computer science concepts. Students learn SQL in order to study the manipulation of a relational database. This course also includes a survey of database platforms.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1110 or CS 1010 or CS 1110 or NET 1010

CIS 2310
Advanced RPG IV
3

Focuses on advanced language features using the RPG IV language. Students are also introduced to the RPG II and RPG III languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1310

CIS 2410
Intermediate Spreadsheets
3

Explores further the features of spreadsheets. Topics include a more in-depth study of spreadsheet functions, database techniques, graphing, and an introduction to macros.

CIS 2510
Systems Development Methods
3

Presents traditional methodologies of system analysis, design, and implementation along with recent developments in the field providing a total approach to information systems development. This course focuses on how to develop information systems in an engineered, disciplined manner utilizing real-world situations and applications.

CIS 2610
Visual BASIC
3

Introduces object-oriented programming design using Visual BASIC.NET for Windows. Students will learn the tools and methods used to analyze real-life problems and develop programs that address those problems. BASIC language has been a long-standing standard for learning programming. Visual BASIC.NET builds on this tradition plus introduces students to the powerful tools of object-oriented programming that have fast become a standard in most Windows programming languages. Continues the study of advanced methods of writing Object-Oriented/Event-Driven (OOED) applications using Visual BASIC.NET. Using realistic case studies, students will exhibit their ability to write code for variables, selection structure, repetition, sequential access files, dialog boxes, error trapping, viewing and manipulating databases, and two-dimensional arrays. Students will also demonstrate their ability to work with a team to design, create, test, debug, document, and present an advanced, multi-form Visual Basic application that incorporates multiple concepts.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1110

CIS 2710
IBM i-Series1 - RPG FREE
3

Introduces program design and development using IBM Free Form RPG. Business problems are analyzed and program definitions prepared as a basis for their computerized solutions. RPG syntax in free form is similar to other modern languages and can be understood easily. It allows programmers who are familiar with other languages such as Microsoft® Visual Basic, Java™, and PHP to be trained more easily in RPG and with lower cost.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2310

CIS 2720
IBM i-Series2 - Watson
3

Explors and analyzes interpreting data using IBM Watson. This course practices combining cloud-based searches, content analysis, and cognitive solutions to view real world data with desired outcomes.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2710

CIS 2730
IBM i-Series3 - DB2 and Web Query
3

Focuses on deploying business intelligence and analytics using IBM DB2 WebQuery. An introduction to report writing and Business Intelligence applications such as dashboards, On Line Analytical Processing (OLAP), and automated report distribution will be presented and practiced.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2720

CIS 3010
Computer Architecture
3

Provides coverage of computer hardware in relation to the system: mechanical implementation, electrical implementation, and optical implementation; system capabilities regarding processor function, storage functions, and communications functions; and computer system design factors. Data representation is covered in depth, including integer data, floating point notation, character data as well as data structures. Processor technology and architecture will be covered, as will system integration and performance through logical and physical I/O, device controllers, I/O processing, data and network communication technologies, networks and distributed systems, network architecture, and OSI network layers.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2110, CS 2310, MTH 1110

CIS 3510
System Modeling and Design
3

Helps students gain the knowledge and skills required to design databases and information systems for the Web. Includes the development of data models including how to organize the modeling task, manage compromises, design for flexibility, achieve basic and advanced normalization, and develop and use generic models. Explains how to model a problem domain by abstracting objects, attributes, and relationships. Describes object-oriented approaches to model the dynamic behavior of a system in terms of state and process models. Students will construct data and object models using Entity-Relationship (ER), Unified Modeling Language (UML), and other techniques.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2210

CIS 3710
Introduction to Healthcare Informatics
3

Explores the integration of health care practice with computer technology and information science. Students will identify, gather, process, and manage information obtained and accessed via advanced information technology. Issues related to the protection of privacy, confidentiality, ethics, and security of information in the healthcare environment will be evaluated.

CIS 4010
Advanced Computer Architecture
3

Continues the study of processor function and system design. Students will evaluate the performance of a given microprocessor using common benchmarks, analyze instruction sets in HLL, RISC, and CISC architectures, and expand their understanding of binary operations and related impact on ALU design. Students will research and compare performance and design factors in parallel, pipelined, and multiprocessor designs; analyze branch prediction impact on program design; and evaluate the effectiveness of hierarchical memory designs. Throughout this course students will engage in periodic research on various topics and will also complete an independent, comprehensive, in-depth analysis of an instructor-approved topic in high performance computer architecture.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 3010, MTH 1410

CIS 4210
Database Administration I
3

Exposes students to database administration and the duties of a database administrator (DBA) to include database monitoring, backup and recovery, troubleshooting, and tuning for reliability and performance. Students will install, configure, and maintain an RDBMS including security, backup and recovery operations, and performance tuning.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2210

CIS 4220
Database Administration II
3

Continues the database administration tasks in the introductory/previous course with a focus on backup and recovery tools and techniques, archiving, loading and transporting data, network administration, and server-side and client-side configuration.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 4210

CIS 4310
Enterprise Architecture
3

Addresses the alignment between business and technology with an emphasis on the use of technology by different organizational units. Decision support systems, enterprise systems, business process reengineering, and knowledge management will be discussed. The advantages and challenges of each system will be evaluated along with system development and implementation strategies.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 4310

CIS 4410
IS Strategy, Management and Acquisition
3

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise and the role information systems plays in it. It develops the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate technology solutions to deal with a variety of business situations. It examines how technology and telecommunications systems enable businesses to succeed in a global marketplace.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 4310

CIS 4810
Systems Development Project
3

Builds upon the theoretical concepts of the Development Cycle learned in the Systems Development Methods. The technical knowledge gained from programming, word processing, spreadsheet, and database applications will also be put to use for the tasks of this course. Students will use the appropriate systems development methodologies, in a team approach, and follow the life cycle methodology and/or the information center techniques learned previously to achieve a demonstrable working solution to a particular Systems Development problem.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2510

CIS 4950
Special Topics in Information Systems
3

Focuses on selected topics of current interest in information systems. Recent development in systems, initiatives and technology related to the information systems field will be discussed.

CIS 4990
Senior Project in Information Systems
3

Examines the systems development process as a whole for the Information Systems field. As part of this course, students will complete a capstone project that examines the use and application of an information system for an organization.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 4410

CM 1010
Introduction to Construction
3

Introduces the overall construction process from initial concept through project completion. Explains the roles and responsibilities in the industry. Focuses on the materials and systems used in construction, with an emphasis on vocabulary building. Explores the career opportunities in the construction industry.

CM 1110
Fundamentals of Drafting and Design
3

Introduces the fundamentals and techniques to communicate graphically in the construction industry. Surveys the use of drafting instruments and focuses on the basic concepts of lettering, geometric construction, sketching, multi-view projection, dimensioning, and sectional view. Sketching techniques is practiced to prepare field drawings/as-builts.

CM 1210
Construction Document Analysis
3

Teaches the interpretation of residential, commercial, and industrial building construction documents including drawings, construction specifications, and general conditions. Students will understand, interpret and efficiently locate information in different parts of a drawing and effectively cross-reference information between drawings and specifications. Students will practice visualizing the three dimensional building from two dimensional drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 1010, CM 1110

CM 2010
Building Codes and Construction
3

Emphasizes the concepts in surveying by measuring distances and angles of objects on or near the surface of the earth with strong emphasis of the technical skills in laying out sites and buildings. Students will use traditional methods and new technology to execute applications of surveying including land property, building stakeout, topographic, and traverse and circular curve surveys.

Corequisite(s):
CM 2120

CM 2110
Computer Aided Architectural Drawing I
3

Introduces students to the use of the computer to draw plans for a single-family residence. A series of drawings will be required.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 1110

CM 2120
Computer Aided Architectural Drawing II
3

Explores wood frame structures as they relate to multi-family, low-rise, office, or small commercial structures. Drawing projects will focus on completion of a set of working drawings.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2110

CM 2210
Building Materials and Construction
3

Acquaints students with building materials as well as construction methods utilized in residential construction.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 1010, CM 1110

CM 2310
Structural Analysis
3

Studies the structural properties of basic framing material (wood, steel, and concrete). Bending, deflection, shear, and moment diagrams will be developed by students as a method of study.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

CM 2410
Builder License/Laws
2

Focuses on the study of the two parts of the residential builder examination and the laws pertaining to it. This course concludes coverage of the State of Michigan pre-licensure education requirements for the Residential Builder Applicants such that at the completion of the Architectural/Construction Technology Associates Degree Program, the student is eligible to take the Residential Builders Examination.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 1110

CM 2510
Environmental Control Systems I
3

Studies the basics of mechanical (HVAC, plumbing, fire protection), electrical (power, lighting, telephone, fire alarm, security, sound, etc.), and building operation (transportation, processing, automation) systems as they are related to the overall planning of a building. Emphasis will be on heating, cooling, ventilation, plumbing, fire protection, electrical, and operation requirements for space planning for various building types.

Corequisite(s):
CM 2110

CM 2610
Construction Cost/Estimating
3

Focuses on the preparation of bid proposals, quantity take-offs, crew sites, daily outputs, and bid packages for general and subcontracted work.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2210, MTH 1310

CM 3060
Advanced Surveying
3

Continues the development of surveying techniques, with strong emphasis of the technical skills in laying out sites and buildings. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CM 3060L

CM 3110
Construction Safety
3

Studies include safety administration, safety program development, federal and governing construction industry standard for safety, such as: OSHA and MIOSHA.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2410

CM 3310
Structural Design I
3

Studies the fundamental concepts/principles of mechanics and strength of materials in dealing with the state of rest of bodies under the action of forces. Applies the equilibrium conditions to the analysis of concrete structures formed by connected members, including reinforced beams, columns, floors, walls, and footings. The design process is studied in depth, utilizing AISC and ACI Standards. A brief review of trigonometry and algebra is to be included.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2310

CM 3320
Structural Design II
3

Continues the study of material strength, basic design, and calculations of structural systems utilizing lumber and structural steel. Includes the strength, stiffness, and stability of various materials. Discusses the stresses caused by bending moments, shear forces, vertical and horizontal loadings, and how to size load supporting structural members under those influences. The design process is studied in depth, utilizing AISC and AF and PA.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 3320

CM 4060
Construction Estimating and Bidding
3

Focuses on detailed cost estimates including quantity takeoffs, labor/material pricing, and overhead/profit. Also, included are bid strategies, and factors affecting construction cost. Computer applications are explored as part of the course.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2610

CM 4110
Legal Aspects of Construction
3

Introduces students to the US legal system as it applies to construction. Emphasis is placed on fundamental concepts of contract and law, claims, risk management, business formation and licensing, agency, insurance and bonding, and real property.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2410

CM 4160
Construction Contract Administration
3

Provides an overview of construction contract administration and enforcement of contract requirements during the construction phase of the project. Computer applications are explored as part of the course.

Corequisite(s):
CM 4110

CM 4210
Sustainable and Energy Efficient Design and Construction
3

Provides a thorough understanding of ecological site systems and sustainable building systems. Current aspects of sustainability will be explored including the impact of the LEED rating system, legislation, environmental law, corporate culture evolution, and integrated design process.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2210, CM 4410

CM 4310
Construction Project Planning and Scheduling
3

Develops advanced construction planning and scheduling techniques, building on previous experience with the critical path method. Integrates the use of computer software as a scheduling tool throughout.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2610

CM 4410
Environmental Control Systems II
3

COURSE DESCRIPTION NEEDED

Prerequisite(s):
CM 2510

CM 4910
Construction Project Management
3

Provides exploration of the roles and tasks required of a construction manager to utilize and extend their knowledge in all areas of expertise used. This is the program capstone course which integrates all aspects of the construction management process.

Prerequisite(s):
CM 3320, CM 4210

Corequisite(s):
CM 4160

CNC 1110
Basic Gauges and Measurements
3

Provides students with an introduction to measurement instruments used in manufacturing settings. Addresses Scales, Calipers, Micrometers, Johansson Blocks, Gauges, and Angular Measurement.

CNC 1310
Machining Theory and Methods
4

Provides students with an introduction to manual mill and lathe practices used in manufacturing settings. Addresses basic machining theory and introduction to the use of common tools and techniques in manufacturing. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CNC 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
CNC 1310

CNC 1510
CNC Theory and Programming
3

Provides students with an introduction to CNC Theory and Operation in manufacturing settings. Addresses feeds, speeds, tools, inserts programming, and sub-programs for CNC machining. This course also prepares students to identify and interpret G-codes and M-codes and develop basic programs for CNC operation. Students learn to produce parts and assemblies using CNC machining and to apply troubleshooting techniques to improve or modify CNC programs. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CNC 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CNC 1510L

CNC 2010
MasterCam
3

Provides training in the use of the world's leading computer-aided manufacturing industry product design software. Students will learn how to use MasterCam to simulate the design and manufacture of virtual parts and tools. In the process, they will gain experience in calculating and applying geometric dimensions, applying predefined tool paths, and configuring precision manufacturing tools and machines.

Corequisite(s):
EGR 1010

CNC 2020
Intermediate MasterCam
3

Explores additional Mastercam concepts and functions, with focus on lathe work and surfacing.

CNC 2030
Advanced MasterCam
3

Yet to be developed. Will not offered in 2017-2018.

COL 4910
General Studies Capstone Portfolio
3

Provides assistance to students in the preparation of a final portfolio which demonstrates professional and personal growth during students' academic careers. Students provide documentation from courses and work experience to develop a portfolio demonstrating how they have met the criteria for each Institutional Student Learning Outcome. This is the capstone course for the Bachelor of General Studies for the Online campus only. The final portfolio will be assessed by Baker College professionals to evaluate if the student has proven competency in the Institutional Student Learning Outcomes.

CQI 1210
Introduction to Quality Theory
3

Provides an understanding of internationally recognized quality standards within the context of manufacturing organization and production. Course covers the components of quality management and the systems and techniques of implementation.

CRJ 1010
Introduction to Criminal Justice
3

Introduces the skills, tools, and methods needed for various criminal justice professions. This course explores philosophical underpinnings of crime and punishments among police, corrections, and the courts. Various ethical and duty related issues are also examined. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ENG 1010

CRJ 1060
Introduction to Corrections
3

Introduces the philosophy and history of corrections. This course examines the corrections system process, including the development of current forms and approaches to corrections including probation, parole, security concepts, and related agencies. The role of a correctional officer is analyzed. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ENG 1010

CRJ 1210
Correctional Facilities
3

Introduces the philosophy and history of corrections. This course examines the corrections system process, including the development of current forms and approaches to corrections including probation, parole, security concepts, and related agencies. The role of a correctional officer is analyzed. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 1310
Diversity in Criminal Justice
3

Examines the meaning and function of culture, the impact and meaning of discrimination, minorities, attitude formation, and professional responsiveness for criminal justice professionals. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 1410
Criminology
3

Examines normal versus criminal behavior, human development and criminal patterns, specific problems, and intervention strategies. This course explores psychological, sociological, and biological theories of criminal behavior. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 1510
Legal Issues in Corrections
3

Provides a thorough examination of how the law impacts corrections related decisions. This course also examines constitutional law, the court process, US courts, and prisoner rights. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 1710
Defensive Tactics
3

Focuses on unarmed defensive tactics, control and movement of prisoners, control of uncooperative subjects, use of non-lethal weapons, and officer survival. Practical training is based on methods of both defensive and offensive techniques used in the control of violent subjects. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 1810
Community Corrections
3

Provides students with an overview of the historical development and implementation of community-based correctional programs and the advantages, disadvantages, effectiveness, and community impact of such programs. Emphasizes supervision of individuals on probation and parole including interviewing, counseling and referral to resources, and preparing written court reports and oral presentations during pre-sentence investigations. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2110
Interpersonal Communication and Conflict Management
3

Provides students with interpersonal communication and conflict management skills that can be used to manage cooperative and uncooperative individuals in criminal justice environments. Application of the skills will be practiced through the use of role play exercises in simulated situations. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2210
Interviewing, Investigations and Report Writing
3

Provides students the learning opportunity to conduct basic investigations, assessments, interviews, and interrogations which may be necessary in criminal justice settings. Students will practice providing oral summaries, note taking, and computer based report writing in a variety of formats, including logs, client assessments, incident reports, investigation reports, interview summaries, and other related documents. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

CRJ 2310
Principles of Policing I
3

Examines both historical and contemporary methods of policing. An emphasis is placed on ethical behavior along with an introduction of tools, skills, and methods used for effective policing. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2320
Principles of Policing II
3

Continues to build on the concepts and methods introduced in CRJ231 and provides additional strategies, techniques, and methods for effective policing. Assesses the societal impact that policing has on the community. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJ 2310

CRJ 2410
Juvenile Justice Concepts
3

Examines the history of juvenile justice models and current processing of juvenile offenders. This course will also examine how the processing of juvenile offenders differs from adult offenders. Analyze the unique juvenile behaviors that may be influenced by social environments. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2510
Ethical Issues in Criminal Justice
3

Focuses on foundational ethical principles and theories including the application of ethical decision making as it relates to criminal justice professionals. The societal implications of unethical behavior are also examined. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2610
Security Management
3

Includes an overview of current forms of security throughout the world. This course allows students to obtain general information on risk management, legal considerations, and ethical issues in the security realm. Students are offered the opportunity to experience risk management activities, communications skills, and develop the ability to effectively seek out a security profession of their choosing. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 2810
Criminal Justice Work Experience I
3

Provides students an opportunity to share current experiences to the didactic components of the program. Requires students to perform a minimum of 150 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a criminal justice agency under the supervision of appropriate personnel to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

CRJ 2990
Law Enforcement Academy

Requires attendance at a MCOLES-certified basic police academy that runs for 16 weeks from start to end. Regional training academies are located throughout the state of Michigan. All training academies are required to teach, as a minimum, the state's basic training curriculum, which is 594 hours in length. At the completion of the academy, all graduates are required to pass a licensing examination administered by the state.

CRJ 3110
Drugs, Crime and Society
3

Examines the relationship between drugs, crime and behavior in society. Drug abuse, drug trafficking, and police response are explored. Trending topics such as drug use decriminalization, and marijuana legalization are explored. Provides a historical overview of US drug policy including the “war on drugs” strategy. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 3210
Criminal Law
3

Explores the criminal justice system using classic and contemporary case law to provide a foundation of legal knowledge. The course also examines the principles underlying the definition of crime including its contemporary application. Furthermore, this course focuses on the interrelationship between criminal law and the criminal justice system. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 3310
Cybercrime Investigations
3

Examines the continued advancements in technology. Students address all forms of social media and how these applications can help solve crime. This course focuses on a range of technical solutions available to law enforcement to retrieve data as part of the investigatory process involving computers and cell phones. Identify theft and various types of online fraud are also examined. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 3410
Introduction to Forensic Science
3

Provides an overview of numerous forensic science tools used to investigate criminal activity and the collection of evidence ranging from finger printing to DNA. Students address chain of custody and the importance of remaining unbiased in the collection and interpretation of evidence. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 3510
Evidence Collection and Procedures
3

Instructs the appropriate methods and procedures for collection, handling, documenting, and storing evidence for later use in criminal proceedings. The consequences for mishandling evidence are also explored. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJ 3410

CRJ 3610
Organized Crime and Youth Gangs
3

Provides historical and contemporary perspectives of organized criminal activity by the mafia and others. White collar crime and corporate corruption are examined along with the social dynamics of youth gangs, violence, prison gangs, and criminality. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 3710
Criminal Courts
3

Provides an overview of the functions, roles, operations, and jurisdictional issues of various local and federal court systems addressing both criminal and civil matters. Includes an examination of various specialized courts to deal with specific societal issues ranging from truancy to substance abuse. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 4210
Evidence-Based Practices
3

Examines social science research designed to improve the effectiveness of criminal justice strategies, interventions, policies and practices. The course uses empirical studies to explore research methods commonly used within the social sciences to introduce and apply the concepts of evidence-based practices. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 4310
Terrorism and Homeland Security
3

Provides a global perspective on terrorism and its impact on homeland security issues post-911 ranging from airport security to local emergency response preparedness. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 4410
Organizational Leadership in Criminal Justice
3

Explores leadership and change theories and practices within paramilitary organizations and the courts to prepare future leaders within the criminal justice professions. Must complete with a C or better.

CRJ 4810
Criminal Justice Work Experience II
3

Provides students an opportunity to share current experiences to the didactic components of the program. Requires students to perform a minimum of 150 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a criminal justice agency under the supervision of appropriate personnel to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
CRJ 1010, CRJ 2810, ENG 1020, PSY 1010, PSY 1110

CS 1010
Principles of Computer Science
3

Provides students an overview of the computer science profession. The course will focus on topics such as history, careers, programming languages, operating systems, databases, and relationship of mathematical concepts.

CS 1110
Introduction to Programming
3

Introduces students to programming concepts such as logic and flow charting as well as some basic programming techniques.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1110

CS 2010
Net-centric Computing
3

Examines the elements of global communication, networking, cloud computing, Internet programming, and programming for mobile devices. Students will experience working as a team to integrate technology used for networking on the Internet to support various users.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1010, CS 1110

CS 2150
C++ Programming
3

Introduces program design and development in the C++ language. Uses Microsoft Visual C++ to provide students with experience using visual development tools. Students will demonstrate the ability to use C++ to design solutions to problems, modify existing C++ programs, and develop complex object-oriented applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1110, MTH 1110

CS 2310
Microprocessor Electronics
3

Introduces students to microprocessor/microcontroller fundamentals. The course will explore basic operating systems, binary math principles, software/hardware interaction, input/output processing, and system implementation.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1010, CS 1110

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1110

CS 2410
Java Programming
3

Introduces students to using the JAVA programming language for developing applications. This is the first of two JAVA programming courses. The use of JAVA in Web-based client and server programming is also covered.

CS 2420
Advanced Java Programming
3

Continues the use of the Java programming language for developing applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2410

CS 3010
Game Design and Analysis
3

Introduces students to storyboarding, game layout, and game design. Students will create scripts and storyboards for existing games and games of their own design.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

CS 3110
C# Programming
3

Introduces students to program design and development using C#. Students will recognize and interpret basic concepts, types, variables, conversions, expressions, statements, namespaces, structs, arrays, interfaces and attributes of C# programming language.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2150

CS 3210
Data Structures and Algorithms I
3

Introduces concepts and techniques for the implementation of data structures and the design and analysis of computer algorithms. Topics include abstract data types and algorithm development using C++.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2150, MTH 1410

CS 3220
Data Structures and Algorithms II
3

Expands on the concepts begun in Data Structures and Algorithms I, including stacks, queues, trees, and binary trees as fundamental conceptual structures of data. Various physical implementations for each conceptual view are examined with emphasis on the concept of abstract data types. Algorithm development continues with coverage of methods solving recurrences, divide-and-conquer algorithms, dynamic programming, greedy algorithms, and graph algorithms.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3210

CS 3310
Application Security Practices
3

Provides students with the ability to recognize, design, and build software security into project development. Strategies and methods of preventing attacks and mitigating exploits, focusing on threat modeling analysis and best security practices will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3110

CS 3410
Programming for Mobile Devices
3

Provides students with opportunities and the experience of developing applications for various mobile devices (i.e. phones, tablets, other multi-media mobile devices).

Prerequisite(s):
CS 2310, CS 2410 or CS 2310, CS 3110

CS 3510
Introduction to Android Mobile SDK and Application Development
3

Focuses on mastering the Android SDK tools in relation to each platform being discussed, specific to application development. Engineering tools are reviewed as well as Java application.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3410

CS 3520
Advanced Android Mobile Application Development
3

Focuses on engineering mobile applications within the Android environment utilizing various SDK's and available tools. This course is a continuation of the Introduction course.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3510

CS 3610
Report Builder Analytics - Cognos
3

Introduces students to the usage of IBM Cognos Analytics. Students will use IBM Cognos Analytics to extract data, analyze data, and produce reports that can be used to make informed decisions. This course provides a powerful toolset for mining, analyzing, score-carding and monitoring of events, data and metrics.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2310

CS 3650
Python Programming
3

Program design and development using Python. Students will demonstrate the ability to use Python to design solutions to problems and develop object-oriented applications

Prerequisite(s):
CS 1110

CS 3710
Introduction to iOS Mobile SDK and Application Development
3

Emphasizes mastering the development tools for iPhone, iPad, and iPod touch screen technology working with Xcode and the iOS SDK. Student will have access to download the complete developer toolset for building Mac, iPhone, and iPad apps, including the Xcode IDE, Instruments, and iOS Simulator.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3520

CS 3720
Advanced iOS Mobile Application Development
3

Focuses on engineering mobile applications within the Apple environment utilizing Xcode and iOS SDK tools. This is a continuation of the Introduction course.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3710

CS 3810
Unreal Game Programming I
3

Introduces students to game programming using game development engine software. Processes of game development, game assets, and introduction to UNREAL development application, binary space portioning, terrain generation, volume development, and lighting are implemented.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4320

CS 3820
Unreal Game Programming II
3

Continues the use of game development engine UNREAL software for programming games. Topics covered will include particle effects, working with the Karma Physics engine, Bot development and AI navigation, and creating scripted sequences.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3810

CS 3850
Game Development
3

Continues the use of the Flash programming language for developing games and graphical animations. It draws heavily upon the concepts and terminology of object-oriented programming languages.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3110

CS 4010
Introduction to Windows Mobile SDK and Application Development
3

Focuses on mastering the Windows Software Development Kit for Windows 8 (Windows SDK) which contains headers, libraries, and a selection of tools to create apps that run on Windows 8 operating systems. You can use the Windows SDK, along with your chosen development environment, to write Windows Store apps (only on Windows 8) using web technologies.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3720

CS 4020
Advanced Windows Mobile Application Development
3

Focuses on engineering mobile and desktop applications within the Windows environment utilizing. This course is a continuation of the Introduction course.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4010

CS 4110
Artificial Intelligence
3

Introduces students to AI technologies for interacting with and playing against large-scale, networked games. Students will learn standard AI techniques including character following, knowledge representation and reasoning, search, learning, and planning.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3850

CS 4210
Database Programming I
3

Provides students the ability to create and maintain database objects to store, retrieve, and manipulate data. In addition, students will write queries to retrieve, summarize, and modify data using joins and subqueries. Students will learn how to create and execute stored procedures and functions. This course also introduces participants to database triggers.

CS 4220
Database Programming II
3

Continues the database programming tasks introduced in the introductory/previous course with a focus on creating custom forms and reports, using advanced debugging techniques, and integrating database applications.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4210

CS 4310
Unity Game Programming I
3

Introduces students to game programming using game development engine software. Processes of game development, game assets, and introduction to Unity development application, binary space portioning, terrain generation, volume development, and lighting are implemented.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 3850

CS 4320
Unity Game Programming II
3

Continues the use of game development engine software for programming games. Topics covered will include particle effects, working with the Karma Physics engine, Bot development and AI navigation, and creating scripted sequences.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4310

CS 4510
Unit Testing and Interfaces
3

Emphasizes skills, tools, and methods related to unit testing and interface integration. Moving from unit testing to system testing is an important component of the course. Fault tolerances, validation testing, testing differences based on industry needs, safety/security, issues, and global collaboration issues will be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2510, CS 3210

Corequisite(s):
CS 3220

CS 4650
Advanced Database Topics
3

Explores advanced database topics such as data mining, data warehousing, geographical information systems, and data-related ethics. This is a capstone course in which students will do an extensive research-based project or writing exercise.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 4220, CS 4220

CS 4810
Trends in Computer Science
3

Examines today s computer technology and investigates future technology trends in the industry. Focus will be on various subjects such as: new technologies, new research, the importance of lifelong learning to stay current, industry frameworks, human/computer interaction, user interfacing by generations, global awareness, mobile device advancements, mobile device programming, security, and other topical issues. This course contains a lab component.

CS 4990
Senior Design Project in Game Software Development
3

Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of game design. At the end of this course students will have designed and programmed a complete game that highlights acquired skills for prospective employers.

Prerequisite(s):
CS 4320

CSC 2010
CISCO CCENT Networking I (Group B)
3

Introduces the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The course also describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Students will also learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPng, single area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. This course prepares students for the Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician Certification (CCENT) and is an official Cisco Networking Academy course. 30 of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 2010L

CSC 2020
CISCO CCENT Networking II (Group B)
3

Continues the introduction of the architecture, structure, functions, components, and models of the Internet and other computer networks. The course also describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in a small network. The principles and structure of IP addressing and the fundamentals of Ethernet concepts, media, and operations are introduced to provide a foundation for the curriculum. By the end of the course, students will be able to build simple LANs, perform basic configurations for routers and switches, and implement IP addressing schemes. Students will also learn how to configure a router and a switch for basic functionality. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with RIPv1, RIPng, single area OSPF, virtual LANs, and inter-VLAN routing in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. This course prepares students for the Cisco Certified Entry Network Technician Certification (CCENT) and is an official Cisco Networking Academy course. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 2010

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 2020L

CSC 2110
CISCO CCNA Networking I (Group C)
3

Describes the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. This course also discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network and understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. This course prepares students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Certification (CCNA) and is an official Cisco Networking Academy course. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 2020

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 2110L

CSC 2120
CISCO CCNA Networking II (Group C)
3

Continues the discussion and work from CSC2110 regarding the architecture, components, and operations of routers and switches in larger and more complex networks. This course also discusses the WAN technologies and network services required by converged applications in a complex network. Students learn how to configure routers and switches for advanced functionality and troubleshoot network devices and resolve common issues with data link protocols. By the end of this course, students will be able to configure and troubleshoot routers and switches and resolve common issues with OSPF, EIGRP, and STP in both IPv4 and IPv6 networks. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement a WLAN in a small-to-medium network and understand the selection criteria of network devices and WAN technologies to meet network requirements. Students will also develop the knowledge and skills needed to implement virtual private network (VPN) operations in a complex network. This course prepares students for the Cisco Certified Network Associate Certification (CCNA) and is an official Cisco Networking Academy course. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 2110

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 2120L

CSC 3310
CCNA Security
4

Emphasizes core security technologies, the installation, troubleshooting and monitoring of network devices to maintain integrity, confidentiality, and availability of data and devices, and competency in the technologies that Cisco uses in its security structure. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 2120

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 3310L

CSC 4210
CCNP Route
4

Prepares students to implement, monitor, and maintain routing services in an enterprise network. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise LAN and WAN routing solutions, using a range of routing protocols in IPv4 and IPv6 environments. The course also covers the configuration of secure routing solutions to support branch offices and mobile workers. Comprehensive hands-on learning and practice reinforce configuration skills. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 3310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 4210L

CSC 4310
CCNP Switch
4

Prepares students to implement, monitor, and maintain switching in converged enterprise campus networks. Students will learn how to plan, configure, and verify the implementation of complex enterprise switching solutions. The course also covers the secure integration of VLANs, WLANs, voice, and video into campus networks. Comprehensive hands-on learning and practice reinforce configuration skills. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 4210

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 4310L

CSC 4410
CCNP Tshoot
4

Prepares students to monitor and maintain complex, enterprise routed and switched IP networks. Skills learned include the planning and execution of regular network maintenance, as well as support and troubleshooting using technology-based processes and best practices, in a systematic and industry recognized approaches. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
CSC 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CSC 4410L

CUL 1010
Sustainability in the Food Service Industry
1

Introduces students to the food service industry and program expectations. Students will discuss the social, historical, and cultural forces that have affected the food service industry. Responsible alcohol service will also be emphasized along with the certification testing (TIPs). Additionally, students will begin understanding the impact of sustainability measures in the food service industry. This is a lecture only course. Must complete with a C or better.

CUL 1110
Food Service Career Skills
1

Focuses on gaining an understanding of the food service industry and career opportunities within the field, through completion of interview skills, professional standards, exploration of professional organizations and credentials. This is a lecture only course. Must complete with a C or better.

CUL 1150
Culinary Math
3

Focuses on the math skills needed to calculate percentages, ratios, the metric system, conversion factors, yield tests, recipe conversion and recipe costing as they relate to the food service industry. Students will develop projections and analyze costs in yield tests and recipe pre-costing. This is a lecture only course. Must complete with a C or better.

CUL 1310
Food Safety and Sanitation
1

Introduces students to food production practices governed by changing federal and state regulations. Topics to be covered include prevention of food-borne illness through proper handling of potentially hazardous foods, HACCP procedures, legal guidelines, kitchen safety, facility sanitation, and guidelines for safe food preparation, storing, and reheating. This course utilizes the National Restaurant Association ServSafe (R) materials, prepares for and culminates with the administration of the National Restaurant Association ServSafe (R) Certification examination. This is a lecture only course. Must complete with a score of 75% or better.

CUL 1410
Nutritional Cooking
1

Introduces students to healthy cooking techniques. Trends, special dietary needs, and creative preparation methods that reduce fat and sodium while maximizing fresh wholesome ingredients will be covered. A vegetable-centric plant based philosophy will be stressed. This is a 30 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

CUL 1510
Culinary Skills I
4

Gives an introduction to kitchen safety, equipment, principles of basic food preparation and cooking techniques in lecture and lab format. Extensive hands-on training is provided for using basic cooking methods and fundamentals. The lecture for this course focuses on cooking principles, theory and the application of culinary skills in the kitchen. This course lays a foundation for the more advanced techniques presented in later coursework. Accompanies the course with the same number. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
CUL 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 1510L

CUL 1520
Culinary Skills II
4

Focuses on principles of food preparation and cooking techniques. Expanded concepts of time lines and multi-tasking, station organization, and culinary French terms will continue. This course focuses on advanced cooking principles, theory and the application of culinary skills. Accompanies the course with the same number. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 1510L

CUL 1530
Culinary Skills III
4

Applies skills and theories and focuses on advanced principles of food preparation and cooking techniques. This class focuses on techniques and methods used in global cuisine and buffet production. This course will focus on the advanced cooking principles, theories, and application of culinary skills. Accompanies the course with the same number. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 1530L

CUL 2160
Baking for Culinary Students
4

Introduces students to the methods and techniques used in baking and pastry production. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

CUL 2210
Purchasing and Product Identification
4

Introduces the identification of a wide variety of common and uncommon food products in various forms. Students will learn store room procedures that include the skill necessary to analyze and improve the profitability of a food service establishment. Other topics will include controlling food and labor costs, flow of goods, product and vendor selection, tasting and evaluating different foods. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

CUL 2250
Table Service
4

Introduces various types of international service styles and techniques. The course will emphasize customer service and food and beverage pairing. Students participate and gain experience in handling reservations, using a point-of-sale system, and responsible alcohol services. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 2250L

CUL 2310
Garde Manger
4

Focuses on the complex methods and techniques of the cold kitchen. Content will also include charcuterie and ACF Competencies for practical exams. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 2310L

CUL 2510
Restaurant Techniques
4

Prepares the students for the innovation, creativity, speed, and multi-tasking abilities required in today's modern kitchen. The lab format for this class will offer students a real working kitchen environment in The Culinary Institute of Michigan's student-run, fine dining restaurant. An extensive range of advanced techniques, ingredients, and recipes illustrate the complex theories and applications. Upon completing this course, students will have achieved a high standard of quality and detail in culinary arts. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1520

Concurrent requisite(s):
CUL 2510L

DAS 1010
Dental Assisting I
4

Introduces students to the dental profession and the role of the dental assistant. This is a preclinical instruction course which includes topics such as the history of dentistry, medical/dental terminology, dental armamentarium, infection control, chairside procedures, team positioning, four-handed dentistry techniques and medical/dental emergency management. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1020
Dental Assisting II
3

Provides a foundation for dental charting, operative and chairside assisting clinical skills, patient management to include the medically compromised, nutrition and preventive dentistry and management of pain and anxiety. This is a preclinical instruction course. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1110
Anatomy, Histology and Pathology for the Dental Assistant
3

Provides an introduction to general anatomy, physiology and oral histology. An in depth study of dental and oral anatomy, tooth morphology, development and structural anatomy of the teeth, orofacial region and oral pathology. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1210
Biomedical Science
2

Provides an introduction to biomedical sciences as they relate to dentistry. Course content includes microbiology, pharmacology, and a comprehensive study of the principles of infection control practices employed in the dental office. 30 hours of lecture are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1310
Dental Materials
3

Provides an in-depth study of the composition, chemical and physical properties, manipulation and application of dental materials. This is a laboratory/preclinical competence course. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1410
Dental Radiography
4

Provides an in-depth study of radiation physics, biologic effects, safety/health and infection control utilized in the dental setting. This is a laboratory/preclinical competence course that has an emphasis on the fundamentals of dental radiographic exposure techniques, quality assurance, evaluation and interpretation of dental radiographs and patient selection criteria. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 1510
Dental Office Management
2

Provides an introduction to business office procedures, including communications, appointment control, supply inventory maintenance, data entry for charges and payments, manage recall systems, dental computer software, operation of basic business equipment and management of patient information and records. 30 hours of lecture are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2010
Clinical Practice Seminar
1

Offers a one hour, weekly seminar for 12 weeks conducted to integrate theory, laboratory practice and student reflection on individual experiences in the clinical externship/practice. 15 hours of lecture are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2011
Clinical Practice
5

Provides 300 hours of dental assisting chairside practice and experience in the workplace. Emphasis is placed on infection control, patient management techniques, communication, professionalism and ethics, and entry-level, four-handed dental assisting procedures. 300 hours of clinicals are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2110
Registered Dental Assistant Functions
3

Provides the knowledge and skills necessary to perform Registered Dental Assistant functions. This is a laboratory/preclinical course that emphasizes the delegated dental procedures for Registered Dental Assistants in the State of Michigan. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2210
Dental Specialties
2

Provides and introduction to dental specialty practices. The following specialties are included: endodontics, oral and maxillofacial surgery, oral pathology, orthodontics, periodontics, pediatric dentistry, prosthodontics, dental public health and forensic dentistry. 30 hours of lecture are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2310
Dental Ethics and Jurisprudence
2

Emphasizes the development of professionalism for dental office personnel. The course will explore the legal and ethical practice of dentistry, risk management and the study of the State Dental Practice Act. Content includes the exploration of interpersonal skills, psychology of patient management and employment and factors related to job satisfaction. 30 hours of lecture are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DAS 2610
CDA/RDA Exam Preparation
2

Provides a comprehensive review of the Dental Assisting Curriculum. This course is designed as a guide for students to enhance their individual preparation for national and state dental assisting board exams. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

DHY 1010
Clinical Dental Hygiene I
3

Introduces students to dental hygiene clinical techniques. Students will develop skills in patient assessment and treatment procedures such as taking medical/dental histories and vital signs, and performing intraoral and extraoral examinations. Students will practice instrumentation techniques, utilizing proper infection control procedures. Additional topics introduced to students include patient communication, fluoride application, occlusal analysis, oral infection control and dental prostheses care. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. 30 hours of lecture and 120 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1010L, DHY 1110, DHY 1110L, DHY 1210, DHY 1350, DHY 1350L

DHY 1020
Clinical Dental Hygiene II
3

Introduces students to patient assessment and treatment in the clinical setting. Emphasis will be placed on the recognition and treatment of the patient with periodontal disease as well as oral hygiene instructions, including tooth brushing and adjunctive aids. Students will also be introduced to chemotherapeutics and dental stain classification. Additional topics will include ultrasonic instrumentation, treatment of hypersensitive teeth, development of the maintenance appointment, and smoking cessation programs. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. 30 hours of lecture and 120 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
DGT 1510, DHY 1020L, DHY 1410, DHY 1510L, DHY 1610

DHY 1030
Clinical Dental Hygiene III
2

Continues patient assessment and treatment in a clinical setting, emphasizing all previously introduced clinical skills. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. 80 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 1020

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1030L, DHY 1710, DHY 1710L

DHY 1110
Oral Anatomy and Histology
4

Provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy of the oral cavity. The microscopic detail, embryological development and function of anatomical landmarks, (including teeth) are addressed. The application of this knowledge to the practice of clinical dental hygiene is presented. The laboratory portion of this course includes a comprehensive analysis of each tooth in the dentition. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1010, DHY 1010L, DHY 1110L, DHY 1210, DHY 1350, DHY 1350L

DHY 1210
Principles of Dental Hygiene
2

Provides students with the knowledge to perform clinical dental hygiene practices within the dental office setting in a safe and efficient manner, following all OSHA guidelines. Topics will include infection control, medical and dental emergencies, and basic dental office procedures. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1010, DHY 1010L, DHY 1110, DHY 1110L, DHY 1350, DHY 1350L

DHY 1310
Head and Neck Anatomy
2

Provides a comprehensive study of the anatomy of the head and neck region, including: skeletal, nervous, circulatory, lymphatic, and muscular systems and their relationship to dental hygiene clinical procedures. Also includes an introduction to the application of this knowledge to the use of local anesthesia. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

Corequisite(s):
HSC 1220, HSC 1221

DHY 1350
Dental Materials
2

Studies the composition and properties of materials used in the practice of dentistry. Emphasis is placed on the materials and procedures for which the dental hygienist is directly responsible. Students will practice proper care and manipulation of the materials in the laboratory. All technical skills are taught to a minimum of laboratory competence. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1010, DHY 1010L, DHY 1110, DHY 1110L, DHY 1210, DHY 1350L

DHY 1410
Oral Pathology
2

Studies disease and the disease process. Emphasis will be placed on the detection and treatment of diseases of the oral region and the oral manifestations of systemic diseases. Case histories are presented in which the student's objective is to formulate a differential diagnosis of an unknown lesion and propose a rational approach for evaluation and treatment of the patient. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1020, DHY 1020L, DHY 1510, DHY 1510L, DHY 1610

DHY 1510
Radiography
3

Focuses on the theories and principles of the x-ray, its nature and properties, and recognition of the normal anatomical structures present in a properly exposed set of periapical and interproximal radiographs. Practice is provided in exposure, development, and mounting of dental radiographs using a variety of techniques. All technical skills are taught to a minimum of laboratory competence. 22.5 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1020, DHY 1020L, DHY 1410, DHY 1510L, DHY 1610

DHY 1610
Pharmacology for the Dental Hygienist
2

Provides a general knowledge of the fundamentals and concepts of drugs commonly used in dentistry and relates this information to the successful practice of clinical dental hygiene. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1020, DHY 1020L, DHY 1410, DHY 1510, DHY 1510L

DHY 1710
Dental Pain and Anxiety Control
3

Provides students with the basic concepts of local anesthetics and pain control. The rationale for pain control, a review of specific anatomic landmarks, physiology, and pharmacology of anesthetic agents will be included. Through lecture and lab, detailed instruction in the use of local anesthesia and nitrous oxide, along with safety measures, will be provided. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. 20 hours of lecture and 40 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 1610

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 1030, DHY 1030L, DHY 1710L

DHY 2040
Clinical Dental Hygiene IV
4

Continues the study of clinical dental hygiene and patient assessment. Emphasis will be placed on treating patients with special needs. A thorough study of nutrition, dietary assessment and planning for patients of all age groups will be included. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. 30 hours of lecture and 180 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 1030

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2040L, DHY 2110, DHY 2210, DHY 2520

DHY 2050
Clinical Dental Hygiene V
4

Continues the practice of clinical dental hygiene designed to increase the student’s efficiency and ability, with a focus on professional and ethical conduct. Continues the study of the techniques and philosophies of treating patients with special needs. Requirements include the case study of a patient with challenging dental needs with written documentation and a class presentation. All procedures are taught to clinical competence. This is the programs capstone course. 30 hours of lecture and 180 hours of lab are required. Students must be complete with a C+ (77%) or better, unless the 80% applies to all "capstone" courses.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 2040

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2050L, DHY 2310

DHY 2110
Periodontics
3

Covers the diagnosis, treatment, and prevention of pathologic conditions affecting the periodontium. Prepares students to evaluate the patient’s disease status and plan the appropriate treatment. Also presents information on periodontal therapies relative to the hygienist’s role as co-therapist in clinical practices. Further study includes the clinical and histological effects of periodontal procedures on oral tissues including surgical and non-surgical techniques used. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2040, DHY 2040L, DHY 2210, DHY 2520

DHY 2210
Community Dentistry and Education
4

Exposes student dental health educators to many of the dental healthcare issues that affect society, the impact they have on dental health, and the educational techniques that can be employed to assist the individual on matters affecting health decisions. Further study will include human behavior, interpersonal relations and communication skills relating to patient education, motivation, and acceptance of healthcare. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2040, DHY 2040L, DHY 2110, DHY 2520

DHY 2310
Dental Law and Ethics
1

Surveys the laws that govern the practice of dental hygiene. A discussion of ethical codes of conduct that guide the dental hygienist is provided. Must complete with a C+ or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2050, DHY 2050L

DHY 2520
Radiographic Interpretation
1

Emphasizes the recognition of normal anatomical landmarks as well as pathological conditions commonly encountered in the practice of dental hygiene. This course is designed to complement DHY1510 (Radiography). Must complete with a C+ or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DHY 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
DHY 2040, DHY 2040L, DHY 2110, DHY 2210

DMD 1110
Introduction to Digital Media Software
3

Introduces students to the industry standard software: Illustrator, Photoshop, InDesign, Dreamweaver. Students will learn the basics of each program as well as when to use each for proper production purposes.

DMD 2010
Social Media Marketing
3

Introduces students to social media and marketing content to utilize as marketing tools. Students will engage in real client and/or simulated social media campaigns that integrate the current and applicable tools for the appropriate audience with current technology.

DMS 1110
Abdominal Sonography
4

Presents sonography anatomy of the normal and abnormal abdomen, retroperitoneum, and major vascular structures. Normal variants and pathology of these areas are also covered. Comparisons are made with normal sonographic appearances so students learn to recognize pathologies and abnormalities. Students are expected to achieve mastery in all areas covered. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DMS 1210, DMS 1310

DMS 1210
OB/GYN Sonography I
3

Presents normal and abnormal conditions of the female pelvis, including uterus, ovaries, 1st trimester obstetrics, and multiple gestations. Comparisons are made with normal sonographic appearances so students learn to recognize pathologies and abnormalities. Students are expected to achieve mastery level in all areas covered. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DMS 1110, DMS 1310

DMS 1310
Sonographic Techniques
3

Presents future sonographers with basic concepts of patient care that will confront them in the medical setting. Theory and practice will include patient transfers, care of drainage tubes, oxygen delivery system, sterile technique, vital signs, medical reporting, ergonomics, and infection control. Emphasis on professional behaviors, and scanning skills while performing assessments identifying beginner sonographic anatomy. This course will prepare students for their professional clinical experience in the work field. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DMS 1110, DMS 1210

DMS 2210
OB/GYN Sonography II
3

Presents normal and abnormal conditions of the 2nd and 3rd trimester, invasive procedures, amniotic fluid index, biophysical profile, and Doppler waveforms. Comparisons are made with normal sonographic appearance so students learn to recognize pathologies and abnormalities. Students are expected to achieve mastery level in all areas covered. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DMS 1210

DMS 2310
Clinical I
6

Provides the opportunity for learning basic sonography skills in the clinical setting. An understanding of operation in the diagnostic facility is also provided. This is the first of 3 structured clinical courses that directs students through progressive levels of experience; observation, participation under personal supervision, provision of care under direct supervision and more independent functioning under general supervision. This is a 16 week rotation to include a minimum of 512 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

DMS 2320
Clinical II
6

Students continue a clinical opportunity for learning sonography skills in a professional setting. This is the second structured clinical courses that directs students through progressive levels of experience; observation, participation under personal supervision, provision of care under direct supervision and more independent functioning under general supervision. This is a 16 week rotation to include a minimum of 512 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
DMS 2310

DMS 2330
Clinical III and Capstone Review
6

This is the final clinical course for mastering sonography skills as an entry level sonographer. Emphasis on mastering scanning technique, and identifying pathology. Students will fulfill all expected clinical competencies, while preparing for their national registry exams. A mock registry for preparation in abdomen, OB/GYN will be administered. This is a 12 week course to include 480 clinical hours. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
DMS 2320

DMS 2410
Superficial Structures and Ultrasound Procedures
2

Covers the normal and abnormal anatomy of sonographic appearance of the breast, soft tissue, prostate, and small parts. Comparisons are made with normal structures so students learn to recognize pathologies and abnormalities. Theory and practice will include such areas as medical ethics, and legal concepts. Students will be expected to achieve mastery level in all areas covered. Must complete with a B- or better.

DSL 1010
Diesel Engine Theory
4

Focuses on the theory of operation for the diesel engine. Fuel, compression, and other systems are discussed. Major components of each are examined as background for examining the engine as a system. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 1010L

DSL 1410
Diesel Electrical/Electronic Systems I
4

Presents a comprehensive diesel electrical course which includes basic electrical theory, electrical/electronic components, wiring and circuit diagrams, circuit protection, switches, relays, solenoids, battery fundamentals, diagnostic equipment and diagnosis. Students are introduced to the application of electrical theory which covers areas including lighting, charging and starting systems, security systems, airbags, navigation systems and sound systems. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 1410L

DSL 1420
Diesel Electrical/Electronic Systems II
4

Continues the coverage from previous courses focusing on advanced diagnostic techniques. Includes computerized testing and analysis of electrical/electronic systems. Advanced diagnostic techniques are utilized to analyze system problems. Also examines new technology including hybrid and fuel-cell systems, navigation systems, safety devices, and other vehicle features and options. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T6 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 1410

DSL 1510
Basic Welding, Cutting and Fabri cation
3

Introduces students to the theory and application of cutting and welding processes. Topics include gas metal arc welding, shielded metal arc welding, plasma arc cutting, and flame cutting techniques as well as hands-on activities completing simple fabrication projects. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

DSL 1710
Diesel Engine Repair
4

Provides students the opportunity to disassemble, reassemble and diagnose modern industry standard diesel engines. This covers entire engine including all aspects of in-frame and major overhaul rebuilds. This including everything from cylinder head and upper engine diagnoses, to engines internals including pistons, rings, bearing and crankshaft. Fuel system, cooling and lubrication systems will also be covered. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T2 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 1710L

DSL 1810
Introduction to Diesel Maintenance and Repair
4

Introduces students to preventative maintenance of diesel equipment. Coverage will include safety equipment, basic vehicle operation, instruments and controls along with hardware, inspections of the brakes, tires, wheels and suspension as well as steering systems. An introduction to Preventative Maintenance Plans (PMP) will be covered. This course prepares students for the T8 ASE test. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T8 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 1810L

DSL 2110
CDL Preparation for the Diesel Service Technician
3

Provides instruction for practice and safe operation of commercial vehicles for Diesel Service students. This course is designed for diesel service technicians who operate commercial vehicles for the purpose of service and diagnosis. Instruction will include pre-trip inspections, range driving, and on-road driving. A majority of class time is spent behind the wheel, however, some lab/classroom time is involved. Students will earn a minimum of 30 hours of driving time in both range and on-road settings. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2110L

DSL 2210
Heavy Duty Brake Service
4

Focuses on the design and operation of the complete air brake system for a tractor and trailer. Diagnosis of system problems as well as the machining and rebuilding of various system components will be performed. Air compressors, air lines, and storage tanks as well as brake switches and trailer brakes will be covered. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T4 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2210L

DSL 2310
Heavy Duty Suspension/Steering
4

Examines the suspension and drive systems for both single axle and dual axle tractors. Steering mechanisms and suspension components are discussed as well as diagnosis and repair of suspension and steering systems. Alignment techniques will be used to properly align a tractor. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T5 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2310L

DSL 2410
Heavy Duty Heating and Air Condi tioning
4

Combines heating and cooling of the truck cab (driver comfort), product refrigeration for freight industry, and passenger comfort for the bussing industry. Students learn to diagnose and repair vehicles and commercial heating/refrigeration systems. Topics include lubricants, compressor types, electrical and mechanical controls, refrigerant types and characteristics, as well as leak testing and repair. Includes lecture and hands-on experiences to assist in preparation for the State License exam for Automotive Heating/Air Conditioning as well as EPA 609 and EPA 608 certifications. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T7 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2410L

DSL 2610
Heavy Duty Drivetrains
4

Focuses on manual transmission drive trains. Diagnosis, service and repair of manual transmissions, transfer boxes, clutches, and single and dual rear drive axles will be covered. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology. At the end of the class, students will be required to take the ASE T3 test in order to earn a final grade for the course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2610L

DSL 2710
Performance Diagnostics and Systems Maintenance
4

Focuses on the fault diagnosis and repair/replacement of computerized engine controls (ECMs), fuel systems, turbo chargers, and super chargers as well as the use of the chassis dynamometer and computerized diagnostic equipment. Additionally, preventative maintenance of systems including engines, fuel, exhaust, cooling and the inspection procedures for brakes, tires and wheels, suspension and steering along with diagnosis and repair related to any of the systems are covered. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Prerequisite(s):
DSL 1710, DSL 1810

DSL 2910
Hydraulic Systems and Repair
3

Focuses on maintenance, inspection, and repair of heavy equipment hydraulic systems. Topics and equipment include pumps, filtration, hoses and fittings, control valves, and actuators. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to count toward the Certificate or Associate Degree program in Diesel Service Technology.

Concurrent requisite(s):
DSL 2910L

ECE 1010
Introduction to Early Childhood Education
3

Focuses on introductory concepts of Early Childhood Education professions including professionalism, ethics, and standards. Historical events as well as current issues are reviewed. Students participate in hands-on activities to develop an understanding of developmentally appropriate practices within learning environments. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1110
Early Childhood Development
3

Focuses on typical and atypical developmental milestones of physical, cognitive, language, and social/emotional development of children from birth to age 12 with a focus on the preschool years. Theories of child development and contributions of theorists are reviewed in the context of application to developmental milestones. The effects that multiple, interrelated environmental factors have on the growth and development of the child will be explored. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1310
Healthy Environments for Early Childhood
3

Focuses on the creation of a safe and healthy learning environment to encourage play, exploration, and learning. Students learn how to use space, relationships, materials, and routines as resources for ensuring an inclusive safe indoor and outdoor learning environment. Focus on how environment affects growth and development through proper nutrition, self-wellness for adults and sanitation guidelines are reviewed. Legal and ethical guidelines for reporting suspected child abuse and neglect are covered. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1410
Creative Activities
3

Focuses on understanding creativity and the development of skills to assist and encourage young children to express their creative natures. Through a hands-on approach, students will compare creative materials and processes using multiple teaching strategies and disciplines. A focus on child-centered and teacher-guided experiences with attention to accommodations for children identified with special needs will be included through both process and product instructional methods. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1510
Administration of Early Childhood Education Programs
3

Focuses on the essential organization, planning, operations, legal issues related to children and staff and ongoing quality improvement of child care centers, preschool environments, and out-of-school care. Licensing, program structure, and accreditation standards, including professionalism and ethics are reviewed. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1650
Observation and Assessment Techniques for Early Childhood Education Programs
3

Focuses on developmentally appropriate, ethical assessment of preschool children. Students will participate in hands-on child evaluation and practice developing assessment documents for parents and institutions for the purposes of determining current levels of functioning and directing curriculum development. Students will demonstrate basic knowledge of the referral process for IEPs and IFSPs, and the roles of the teachers, parents and helping professional in these processes. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1710
Language Development and Language Arts
3

Focuses on milestones of language development in children from birth to age 12. An exploration of language arts theory and techniques to assist children in developing foundational skills through curriculum planning that will allow them to be proficient in listening, speaking, reading, and writing is reviewed. Techniques include creative drama, puppetry, whole language exploration and phonemic awareness. Students will also review structural and transformational linguistics theories. Specific attention is paid to English Language Learners as they acquire language in the classroom. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 1910
CDA Preparation
2

Focuses on the development of documentation for the CDA credential as outlined by the Council for Professional Recognition. The course is designed to develop the CDA Resource File and prepare students for the Observational Assessment. This is a 12 week course. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2010
Infant and Toddler Development and Curriculum
3

Focuses on developmental milestones for children birth through 35 months in cognitive, language, physical, and social/emotional domains, including typical and atypical development. Provides an intense look at methods of designing and implementing appropriate programs, including curriculum and assessment, physical space adaptations, and parent/school/community partnerships. Review of applicable early intervention procedures, including IEPs and IFSPs is explored. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2020
Infant and Toddler Development and Curriculum Lab
1

Focuses on developmentally appropriate interactions between adults and children birth through 35 months in and infant/toddler ECSE, or licensed infant or toddler program. Field work components will include a focus on relationship building, environmental structure and professionalism in infant/toddler environments. Includes 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2020L
Infant and Toddler Development and Curriculum Lab
1

Focuses on developmentally appropriate interactions between adults and children birth through 35 months in and infant/toddler ECSE, or licensed infant or toddler program. Field work components will include a focus on relationship building, environmental structure and professionalism in infant/toddler environments. Includes 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ECE 2010

ECE 2110
Developing Anti-Bias Curriculum
3

Focuses on multiple influences of bias as well as the possible effects of personal attitudes and dispositions on children's development and learning. Students will analyze classroom environments for practices of equality, respect, and tolerance. Curriculum will be developed that will promote anti-bias ideals, create a strong classroom community, and empower families through positive reciprocal relationships. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2210
Math, Science, Technology and Engineering for Early Childhood
3

Focuses on the integration of developmentally appropriate math, science, and technology and engineering content into the early childhood classroom curriculum. The process of using inquiry tools and problem-solving strategies and focused learning centers with content embedded in all other classroom areas is explored. Emphasis is placed on development of activities and procedures that put the child in the position of problem solving through hands-on, exploratory processes in groups or individually. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2310
Guidance and Discipline
3

Focuses on typical and atypical social and emotional development of children birth to age 12. After reviewing assessment strategies, students will review the process for additional consultation and/or referral for children displaying atypical development, including referrals to Child Protective Services for suspected abuse or neglect. Students will apply child development theories and research through development of curriculum that enhances each child's social skills as an individual and through community group building activities. Includes 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2510
Developing Curriculum for Early Childhood
3

Focuses on developmentally appropriate design of curricula that promotes the growth and development of the preschool child (ages 3 and 4) with curricular connections to early elementary. Differentiation for special needs is reviewed. Curricular domains covered are aesthetic, affective, cognitive, language, physical, and social/emotional. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2710
Early Childhood Education Practicum I
3

Focuses on planning and implementing a developmentally appropriate, anti-bias, child-centered classroom environment across curricular and developmental domains. Students will demonstrate competence in child assessment, group guidance, advocacy, peer collaboration, and parent communication. Includes 125 hours of supervised participation in a licensed preschool for children for ages 3 and 4, or an ECSE preschool program. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 2810
Parents and Teachers: Partners in Education
3

Focuses on information and strategies that can be used by teachers to encourage parents to work in partnership with schools. Promoting holistic child development with the parent in the role of the teacher in the home and community with the teacher as support to the parent is explored. The teacher's role as a child advocate through mandated reporting for child abuse or neglect and family advocate through the IEP/IFSP process is reviewed. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3010
Advocating for Young Children
3

Focuses on investigating public policies that support young children. Defines role of early childhood professional as advocate in various situations, including child abuse and neglect/mandated reporting, IEP's and IFSP's, anti-bias behaviors, addressing preconceived gender identity and gender roles, encouraging healthy living and supporting chronically ill children. Investigates historical perspectives that have served as an agent for change. Examines global perspectives. Discusses application of child growth and development to strengthen families. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3510
Philosophies in Early Childhood Education
3

Explores contemporary early childhood educational practices and theoretical foundations of curriculum. The following philosophies will be explored and compared: Reggio Emilia, Montessori, High Scope, Creative Curriculum, Waldorf, Project Approach, and others with a focus on developmentally appropriate practices within each philosophy/curriculum model. Student creates personal philosophy, integrating educational learning theories with child growth and development best practices. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3610
Survey of Early Childhood Education Programs
3

Compares and contrasts the quality of early childhood education programs within the community, both onsite and through research. Standardized data collection tools—ECERS and PQA predominant—are utilized to form clear and concise data-support conclusions about programs. Students will use data collected to identify program strengths and opportunities for growth in multiple program areas including staff training, implementation of procedures and materials, and communication processes. Includes 120 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3650
Effect of Trauma and Stress on the Learning and Development of Young Children
3

Explores how stress, trauma and violence impact young children's development and the lives of their families. Students will investigate the role of early Childhood Education professionals and the professional ethical responsibility. A major emphasis will be on understanding the special learning needs of young children. Working with adult family members and agencies will also be emphasized. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3710
Early Childhood Education Practicum II
3

Provides students with a direct fieldwork experience implementing curriculum content in a lead teacher role under a qualified teacher. Michigan curriculum standards will serve as the basis for instruction. Includes 135 hours of participation in a structured program for 3-5 year olds. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 3750
Implementation of Curriculum in an Early Childhood Education Environment
3

Develops daily, weekly, and monthly lesson plans to be implemented within the practicum. Developmentally appropriate practices and Michigan curriculum standards will provide the framework for on-going assessment of the curriculum implementation. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4010
Advanced Infant and Toddler Care and Curriculum
3

Examines the importance of parent and caregiver relationships in developing quality care for infants and toddlers. The essentials of infant and toddler caregiving, developmental growth patterns, and direct observations will be emphasized. A 30-hour fieldwork observation is required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4410
Music and Movement for Young Children
3

Focuses on the physical development, music curriculum, and movement activities in an early childhood education environment. This course will require a hands-on demonstration of skills. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4510
Early Childhood Education Practicum III
3

Provides a supervised fieldwork experience in an administrative role that focuses on leadership and management techniques. Includes 135 hours of participation in a quality licensed program for birth-five year olds. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4550
Administrative Operations of Early Childhood Education
3

Provides critical application of essential administrative duties as performed in an early childhood education environment. Knowledge of professional and ethical responsibilities will be evaluated. The duties shall include supervising, organizing, budgeting, accounting, and scheduling skills. Licensing standards and NAEYC accreditation will be emphasized. Includes 135 hours of fieldwork.Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4610
Early Assessment and Referral
3

Focuses on knowledge of characteristics and classifications of common delays, impairments, and disabilities. Tools of assessment and methods of referral for young children demonstrating atypical development with an emphasis on the goals and benefits of developmentally appropriate assessment is explored. IFSP, IEP, early intervention, and legal issues surrounding these topics will be featured. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4710
Early Literacy Intervention
3

Provides essential background into speech, cultural, linguistic and language development of young children. An emphasis will be placed on the link between home and educational environment. Home-to-school activities will be developed. Must complete with a C or better.

ECE 4910
Senior Seminar: Early Childhood Education
3

Focuses on multiple influences on child growth and development through cross content curricular applications with a focus on health, safety, and nutrition. Students will recognize themselves within the framework of the professional community of early childhood educators. Licensing, regulation, and program administration issues will be highlighted. This is the capstone course for students seeking the ZS teaching endorsement. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and pedagogical knowledge are required. Must complete with a C or better.

ECN 2010
Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

ECN 2110
Principles of Microeconomics
3

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

ECN 3010
International Economics
3

Prerequisite(s):
ECN 2010

EDU 1410
Health and Physical Education for Elementary Educators
3

Focuses on the importance of health and physical education for children in grades K-8. Students will learn how to incorporate health and physical education into their curriculum using research-based teaching strategies. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

EDU 1510
Visual and Performing Arts for Elementary Educators
3

Explores the integration of the visual and performing arts (music, dance, and drama) into the elementary classroom. Introduces the techniques, processes, materials, and concepts of the visual and performing arts. Provides opportunities to create meaningful learning experiences using the visual and performing arts. Establishes a foundation of the historical, social, and cultural contexts of the visual and performing arts.

EDU 2010
Introduction to Professional Education Experiences
3

Introduces candidates to the realities of the teaching profession, the structure and operation of schools, current educational issues and trends, and the foundations of education. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 2110
Number Concepts for Educators
27

Introduces key mathematical concepts in a problem-solving environment with a focus on number sense and numeration, whole number operations, fractions and decimals, computational algorithms, patterns, relations, functions, and informal algebra. A variety of materials, electronic tools, activities, and strategies are used to investigate patterns and test conjectures. Strategies appropriate for teaching elementary school mathematics are utilized. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

EDU 2120
Geometric and Statistical Concepts for Educators
3

Introduces the principles of key mathematical concepts in a problem-solving environment. Focuses on mathematical logic, properties of two- and three-dimensional figures, similarity and congruence, motion geometry, common and metric measurement, statistical methods to describe, analyze, and use data, and probability applied in everyday life. Includes a variety of materials, electronic tools, activities, and strategies for teaching elementary school mathematics. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2110

EDU 2210
Children's Literature
3

Analyzes and evaluates various classical and contemporary works written for children. Students will apply critical reading and writing skills to the exploration of various genres and the conventions that define those genres. In addition, the course will focus on developing strategies for engaging young readers in developmentally appropriate books. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 2510
Science Foundations I: Chemistry and Life Science
3

Introduces the basic concepts of inorganic chemistry: atoms, molecules, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and chemical equations. This course also introduces the principles of life science: plant and animal cells, ecosystems, human body systems, genetics, evolutionary change, and natural selection. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 2510L

EDU 2520
Science Foundations II: Astronomy, Earth Science, and Physics
3

Studies the solar system, the earth's structure, and the laws and forces which govern our planet and the universe as a whole. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 2520L

EDU 3110
Social Studies for Elementary Teachers
3

Integrates the disciplines of economics, geography, history, and political science, to provide an overview of the concepts, methods, and relationship between the disciplines. Provides necessary content, resources, and pedagogy for the elementary social studies teacher. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020 GEO 1010 GEO 1020 HIS 3410 POL 3010

EDU 3120
Educational Psychology
3

Focuses on the learning process including the role of the teacher in learning; efficiency of learning as it is affected by the developmental processes; psychological principles that are central to the learning process and their relationship to the teaching situation; variables in learning; and evaluation of the outcomes of learning. Emphasizes application of learning theory and multicultural concepts in a field-based context. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3210
Theory and Principles of Reading Instruction
3

Focuses on theory and process in developmentally appropriate reading and writing instruction, including language and literacy acquisition, comprehension, word recognition, methods of instruction and assessment, program development, and planning for individual instructional needs. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3120

EDU 3310
The Exceptional Learner
3

Studies the physical, psychological, social, and educational factors related to exceptional individuals, including intellectually gifted, English language learners, and the handicapped. Emphasizes collaborative historical, legal, legislative, and futuristic aspects of educating the exceptional learner. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3120

EDU 3410
Language Arts and Linguistic Foundations
3

Applies linguistic theory to language arts education. Includes an overview of structural and transformational linguistics and the impact on oral and written communication, including an examination of first and second language acquisition. Explores theory and techniques of listening, speaking, and writing effectively in the English language. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 3460
Integrating Technology into 21st Century Learning
3

Introduces selection, evaluation, and use of appropriate media, including microcomputers and Web-based learning, as an integral part of the curriculum to achieve stated learning objectives. Provides hands-on experience in preparing and using leading edge technology, materials and equipment for effective classroom learning. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 4210
Reading in the Content Areas
3

Studies the principles, techniques, and processes of literacy instruction needed to help candidates become independent, strategic learners in the content areas taught in the elementary school. Applies learning principles and practices to real-world teaching situations. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in K-8 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3210

EDU 4310
Instructional Design and Assessment
3

Prepares candidates to design curriculum and assessments aligned to state and national standards. Instructional design principles as well as formative and summative assessment practices will be covered. Practice using assessment data to drive curricular and instructional decisions. Emphasis on teaching and learning for all students. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3310

EDU 4410
Classroom Development
3

Focuses on classroom development techniques, which lead to the creation of a positive, democratic learning environment. The techniques learned will help P-12 students monitor and adjust behavior in order to achieve self-discipline. The culminating activity is a Classroom Development Plan. This course requires 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460 and EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4550

EDU 4450
Educational Foundations
2

Studies education and schooling in American culture and society. Focuses on the interpretation and appraisal of current educational practices and trends. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4810

EDU 4550
Theory and Techniques of Instruction I
3

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460 EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4560

EDU 4560
Theory and Techniques of Instruction II
2

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 4310

EDU 4810
Directed Teaching
10

Requires candidates to observe and teach in P-12 classroom settings for approximately 18 weeks during regular school hours, following the school district calendar and the supervising teacher's contractual agreement. Attendance at professional development conferences and seminars may be required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4450

EDU 1410
Health and Physical Education for Elementary Educators
3

Focuses on the importance of health and physical education for children in grades K-8. Students will learn how to incorporate health and physical education into their curriculum using research-based teaching strategies. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

EDU 1510
Visual and Performing Arts for Elementary Educators
3

Explores the integration of the visual and performing arts (music, dance, and drama) into the elementary classroom. Introduces the techniques, processes, materials, and concepts of the visual and performing arts. Provides opportunities to create meaningful learning experiences using the visual and performing arts. Establishes a foundation of the historical, social, and cultural contexts of the visual and performing arts.

EDU 2010
Introduction to Professional Education Experiences
3

Introduces candidates to the realities of the teaching profession, the structure and operation of schools, current educational issues and trends, and the foundations of education. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 2110
Number Concepts for Educators
3

Introduces key mathematical concepts in a problem-solving environment with a focus on number sense and numeration, whole number operations, fractions and decimals, computational algorithms, patterns, relations, functions, and informal algebra. A variety of materials, electronic tools, activities, and strategies are used to investigate patterns and test conjectures. Strategies appropriate for teaching elementary school mathematics are utilized. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

EDU 2120
Geometric and Statistical Concepts for Educators
3

Introduces the principles of key mathematical concepts in a problem-solving environment. Focuses on mathematical logic, properties of two- and three-dimensional figures, similarity and congruence, motion geometry, common and metric measurement, statistical methods to describe, analyze, and use data, and probability applied in everyday life. Includes a variety of materials, electronic tools, activities, and strategies for teaching elementary school mathematics. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2110

EDU 2210
Children's Literature
3

Analyzes and evaluates various classical and contemporary works written for children. Students will apply critical reading and writing skills to the exploration of various genres and the conventions that define those genres. In addition, the course will focus on developing strategies for engaging young readers in developmentally appropriate books. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 2510
Science Foundations I: Chemistry and Life Science
3

Introduces the basic concepts of inorganic chemistry: atoms, molecules, the periodic table, chemical reactions, and chemical equations. This course also introduces the principles of life science: plant and animal cells, ecosystems, human body systems, genetics, evolutionary change, and natural selection. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 2510L

EDU 2520
Science Foundations II: Astronomy, Earth Science, and Physics
3

Studies the solar system, the earth's structure, and the laws and forces which govern our planet and the universe as a whole. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 2520L

EDU 3110
Social Studies for Elementary Teachers
3

Integrates the disciplines of economics, geography, history, and political science, to provide an overview of the concepts, methods, and relationship between the disciplines. Provides necessary content, resources, and pedagogy for the elementary social studies teacher. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, GEO 1010, GEO 1020, HIS 3410, POL 3010

EDU 3120
Educational Psychology
3

Focuses on the learning process including the role of the teacher in learning; efficiency of learning as it is affected by the developmental processes; psychological principles that are central to the learning process and their relationship to the teaching situation; variables in learning; and evaluation of the outcomes of learning. Emphasizes application of learning theory and multicultural concepts in a field-based context. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3210
Theory and Principles of Reading Instruction
3

Focuses on theory and process in developmentally appropriate reading and writing instruction, including language and literacy acquisition, comprehension, word recognition, methods of instruction and assessment, program development, and planning for individual instructional needs. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3310
The Exceptional Learner
3

Studies the physical, psychological, social, and educational factors related to exceptional individuals, including intellectually gifted, English language learners, and the handicapped. Emphasizes collaborative historical, legal, legislative, and futuristic aspects of educating the exceptional learner. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3120

EDU 3410
Language Arts and Linguistic Foundations
3

Applies linguistic theory to language arts education. Includes an overview of structural and transformational linguistics and the impact on oral and written communication, including an examination of first and second language acquisition. Explores theory and techniques of listening, speaking, and writing effectively in the English language. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

EDU 3460
Integrating Technology into 21st Century Learning
3

Introduces selection, evaluation, and use of appropriate media, including microcomputers and Web-based learning, as an integral part of the curriculum to achieve stated learning objectives. Provides hands-on experience in preparing and using leading edge technology, materials and equipment for effective classroom learning. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2010

EDU 3710
Early Childhood Education ZS Practicum
3

Focuses on planning and implementing a developmentally appropriate, child-centered classroom environment across curricular and developmental domains. Students will demonstrate competence in child assessment, group guidance, advocacy, peer collaboration, and parent communication. Includes 120 hours of lead teaching in a pre-school program with special needs students. Course assignments demonstrating subject matter and content application are required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ECE 2510

EDU 3810
Service Learning Project
1

Provides an opportunity for students to work on a service learning project that applies their professional skills in a civic assignment that addresses the needs of the community. The students work with the instructor to design, implement, and evaluate the project. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, POL 3010

EDU 4210
Reading in the Content Areas
3

Studies the principles, techniques, and processes of literacy instruction needed to help candidates become independent, strategic learners in the content areas taught in the elementary school. Applies learning principles and practices to real-world teaching situations. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in K-8 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3210

EDU 4250
Literacy Education in the Secondary School
3

Introduces the theoretical foundation for literacy development and the methods and processes in developmentally appropriate instruction. Emphasizes the principles, techniques, and processes of literacy instruction needed to help candidates become independent, strategic learners in the content areas taught in middle and high schools. Includes 20 hours of observation and participation in grade 6-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3310

EDU 4310
Instructional Design and Assessment
3

Prepares candidates to design curriculum and assessments aligned to state and national standards. Instructional design principles as well as formative and summative assessment practices will be covered. Practice using assessment data to drive curricular and instructional decisions. Emphasis on teaching and learning for all students. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3310

EDU 4410
Classroom Development
3

Focuses on classroom development techniques, which lead to the creation of a positive, democratic learning environment. The techniques learned will help P-12 students monitor and adjust behavior in order to achieve self-discipline. The culminating activity is a Classroom Development Plan. This course requires 30 hours of fieldwork. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4550

EDU 4450
Educational Foundations
2

Studies education and schooling in American culture and society. Focuses on the interpretation and appraisal of current educational practices and trends. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4810

EDU 4550
Theory and Techniques of Instruction I
3

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4560

EDU 4560
Theory and Techniques of Instruction II
3

Introduces the theory of instruction, methods, and instructional strategies. Includes observations of classroom procedures, participation in simulation, and micro-teaching in P-12 classrooms. Content specific teaching strategies for all areas including English/language arts, mathematics, social studies, science, and all elementary disciplines will be developed. Emphasizes the application of effective instructional theory and practice, sound decision making, and multicultural education in a field-based context. Includes 30 hours of participation in P-12 classroom settings. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 3460, EDU 4310

EDU 4760
Theory and Techniques Practicum
6

Requires candidates to participate in a minimum of 240 hours in P-12 classrooms student teaching at the appropriate grade level as approved by the Dean. Also includes 30 hours with a supervisory working on instructional strategies and planning. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

EDU 4810
Directed Teaching
10

Requires candidates to observe and teach in P-12 classroom settings for approximately 18 weeks during regular school hours, following the school district calendar and the supervising teacher's contractual agreement. Attendance at professional development conferences and seminars may be required. Must complete with a C or better in order to complete the Teacher Preparation Program.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EDU 4450

EDU 5110
Data Analysis for Educators
3

Provides candidates with a basic understanding of statistics and data analysis, with emphasis on using data for decision making.  Topics will include significance testing, interpreting data, reading charts and graphs, reading quantitative research,  and data in an education setting.  Content will also incorporate using technology for data analysis.

EDU 5210
Assessment and Evaluation for Educators I
3

Introduces candidates to a broad spectrum of assessment types. Candidates will design assessments and scoring protocols, including rubrics. Hands-on experience with assessment design, item analyses, reliability, and validity will be included. State assessments, college entrance and placement exams, and national accreditation requirements will be used as examples. Current trends in assessment including the use of technology will be discussed.

EDU 5220
Research and Decision Making in Education
3

Applies research and assessment results to the decision-making process. Candidates will develop goals that support the mission of programs and institutions, incorporating assessment data into planning cycles and decision making. Candidates will discuss using assessment data for program evaluation, accreditation and grant writing. Additional topics include emerging trends in educational research, writing and analyzing surveys, and data disaggregation. Data management software and other technology used to support decision making will be reviewed.

EDU 5310
Learning Theory and Instruction for Educational Improvement
3

Reinforces best practices in curriculum and instruction leading to improved learning, including pedagogy and andragogy. Candidates will integrate curriculum, assessment and instruction to create a coherent picture of the educational process. Analysis of data to determine program strengths and weaknesses will be conducted. Explores the role of educational leader in curriculum and instruction.

EDU 6010
Leadership for Accountability
3

Explores approaches to educational leadership which emphasize continuous improvement, project management, and leading change. Candidates will focus on learning communities, data-driven decisions, assessment as planning, strategic planning, systems theory, goal setting, self-reflection and developing a vision. Additional topics include the history of educational leaders, educating for the common good, conflict resolution, problem solving and using technology to lead. 30 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 6040
Organizations, Innovation and Accountability
3

Develops organizational planning skills through effective communication, human resource management, and conflict resolution, while managing for improvement. Explores the leader's role in organizational culture. 30 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 6070
Faculty Evaluation and Growth to Improve Student Learning
3

Researches professional development systems that focus on improving teaching and learning. Candidates will assess and critique best practices in faculty evaluation and learn how to engage faculty in a growth process that results in a measurable action plan for improvement. 30 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 6110
Fiscal, Facilities and School Management
3

Applies accounting principles to leadership and management in schools. Candidates will focus on using strategic planning, accountability and vision to set financial goals. Emphasis is placed on budgeting priorities based on improving learning, prioritizing operations, creating safe and secure environments, and overall accountability. 30 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 6140
Public Policy, Values, and Legal and Ethical Issues in Accountability
3

Researches legal and ethical issues in educational leadership. Candidates will focus on public policy and the impact on day-to-day school operations along with studying current issues in education such as Common Core, faculty evaluation, No Child Left Behind, alternative teacher preparation. Candidates will develop a code of ethics and examine the impact of one's practice on treating people with respect. Additional topics include considering schools in context through political, social, cultural, global, policy development, diversity and equity issues. Locating reliable information on best practices, professional development, and other information relevant for practice in education will also be included.

EDU 6170
School and Community Relations
3

Locates and maximizes resources within a community including relationship building, capitalizing on people's strengths, and working with diversity to enrich the school. Topics include marketing, business and government partnerships, having an informed public, and working with families as partners. Candidates will learn to create and maintain media relationships. 30 hours of fieldwork required.

EDU 6210
Technology for Improving Education
3

Gives students the opportunity to develop an understanding of emerging and innovative technologies and how they can support educational improvement efforts. Candidates will learn how to effectively manage technologies in the area of assessment, data analysis, and communication. In addition, candidates will gain an understanding of confidentiality and privacy laws, policies and procedures, copyright laws, and intellectual property restrictions.

EDU 6410
Instructional Design for Higher Education
3

Develops the ability to create and implement an instructional design process. Candidates will research best practices in instructional design including: addressing stakeholder needs in program, course and curriculum development, creating quality curriculum, utilizing common assessment of student work, and incorporating technology to maximizing student learning.

EDU 6440
Course Facilitation in Higher Education
3

Analyzes multiple adult learning theories as candidates construct a student centered teaching philosophy. Candidates will develop the resources necessary to select and use a variety of instructional strategies to effectively address various learning situations. In addition, candidates will model the facilitation of a learning environment focused on improved retention and student learning.

EDU 6470
Effective Distance Learning Programs
3

Researches and analyzes the organizational commitment and resources required to effectively serve students in a distance education environment. Candidates will explore the quality benchmarks and parameters essential for addressing the emerging educational trends and challenges of distance education.

EDU 6910
Educational Effectiveness Capstone Experience
3

Creates a data-driven solution for solving a current educational problem. Candidates will develop a plan that is grounded in research and theory, and relies on established best practices. The plan will include recognition of all stakeholders, the establishment of benchmarks and targets for improvement, and a detailed implementation strategy. 75 hours of fieldwork required.

EE 2110
Circuits and Electronics I
4

Introduces the analysis of analog and digital circuits. Covers voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Introduces digital logic, logic gates, the MOSFET, and single-stage amplifiers. Emphasizes network theorems, node and mesh analysis, and nonlinear analysis. Covers sinusoidal excitation, phasors, steady-state AC analysis, and the operational amplifier (op-amp). Includes computer analysis and simulation. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
SCI 2520

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 2110L

EE 2120
Circuits and Electronics II
4

Introduces the analysis of analog and digital circuits. Covers voltage, current, resistance, capacitance, and inductance. Introduces digital logic, logic gates, the MOSFET, and single-stage amplifiers. Emphasizes network theorems, node and mesh analysis, and nonlinear analysis. Covers sinusoidal excitation, phasors, steady-state AC analysis, and the operational amplifier (op-amp). Includes computer analysis and simulation. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110

Corequisite(s):
MTH 3550

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 2120L

EE 2210
Digital Logic and Circuits
3

Introduces discrete-state logic, circuits, and systems. Covers number bases and integer arithmetic, digital electronic parameters, logic circuits and gates, and combinational logic design using Boolean algebra and computer tools. Covers adders, comparators, encoders and decoders, multiplexers and de-multiplexers, and parity generators. Continues with latches and flip-flops, synchronous logic design, and finite state machines. Includes hardware description languages.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120 or MTH 1310

EE 3130
Circuits and Electronics III
4

Introduces semiconductor physics and devices. Covers the p-n junction, diode, bipolar transistor, metal-semiconductor junction, and MOSFET. Emphasizes biasing, small-signal analysis, single-stage amplifier design, and frequency response. Includes bipolar and CMOS differential amplifiers, feedback, and stability. Addresses digital circuits including static CMOS, dynamic logic, pass-transistor logic, and integrated circuits. Includes computer simulation of digital circuits. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3130L

EE 3210
Microprocessors and Microcontrollers
3

Presents microprocessor architecture, including instruction sets, addressing modes, memory organization, interrupts, timers, and peripherals. Covers analog, digital, and wireless interfacing. Emphasizes programming in ARM Cortex-M assembly language, and extends coverage of C programming, with an emphasis on features common in embedded systems: peripheral interfacing, real-time constraints, and flash file systems.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3250, EE 3270

EE 3250
Automation and Control
2

Focuses on industrial automation systems. Includes sensors, data acquisition, measurement systems; motor drives, process control; Proportional/ Integral/ Derivative (PID) control, Programmable Logic Controllers (PLC's). Introduces LabView and ‘virtual instruments.'

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3210, EE 3270

EE 3270
Microprocessor/Automation Control Lab
1

Explores and applies the theories and techniques of microprocessors and automation/control in extended laboratory exercises. 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 3210, EE 3250

EE 3410
Electromagnetic Fields and Waves
4

Reviews vector analysis. Analyzes static electric fields, steady electric currents, and static magnetic fields, in free space and material media. Presents time-varying electromagnetic fields, the EM spectrum, and Maxwell's Equations. Analyzes time-harmonic fields with phasors. Analyzes planar EM waves, transmission lines, waveguides, cavity resonators, and simple antennas.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120

Corequisite(s):
MTH 3510

EE 3610
Dynamic Systems and Control
3

Introduces mathematical modeling of mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems in graphical and state equation form. This course includes time and frequency response of linear systems and linear feedback control.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2120, MTH 3550

EE 4140
Circuits and Electronics IV
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3410

EE 4210
Digital Logic Design
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4210L

EE 4230
Digital Signal Processing
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4310

EE 4250
Embedded Software
3

EE 4310
Signals and Systems
3

Analyzes continuous and discrete-time signals. Covers continuous linear time-invariant systems, causality, impulse response, superposition, and convolution. Includes Fourier series, Fourier transforms, spectra, the Sampling theorem, frequency response, and filtering. Includes digital signal processing using the discrete Fourier transform and computer modeling/simulation.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3610, MTH 3550

EE 4350
Communication Systems and Circuits
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4310

EE 4410
Opto-Electronics
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4410L

EE 4450
Laser Systems and Applications
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 4410

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4450L

EE 4510
Energy Conversion and Power Electronics
4

Introduces power electronics, including power diodes and rectifiers, thyristors, and transistors. Analyzes DC-DC and DC-AC converters, and inverters. Covers magnetic circuits, inductors, transformers, and motor drives. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4510L

EE 4610
Robotics
3

Continues topics of computer control into robotic devices. Covers methods of robotic programming and robotic sensing. Discusses types and applications of robotic devices within industry and healthcare. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130, EE 3250

Concurrent requisite(s):
EE 4610L

EE 4710
Electronic Design Automation
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 3130

EET 1110
Electrical Technology
4

Introduces electrical fundamentals: nomenclature, symbols, SI units, and schematic diagrams. Covers conductors, voltage, current, resistance, and power. Uses Ohm's, Watt's, and Kirchhoff's Laws and the Thevenin theorem to analyze series and parallel circuits. Covers magnetism, alternating current, and capacitance. Emphasizes hands-on lab experiments, test and measurement equipment, and technical report writing. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EET 1110L

EET 1150
Circuits
4

Continues EET 1110 with inductance, time constants, and resonance. Introduces semiconductor devices and electronic circuit applications. Devices include diodes, transistors, and op-amps. Applications include amplifiers, op-amp functions, active filters, and power supply circuits. Emphasizes lab experiments, troubleshooting, test equipment, and technical writing. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EET 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EET 1150L

EET 1610
Introduction to Robotics
3

Provides an overview of industrial robots, mobile robots, control, actuators, and sensors. Basic robotic mechanics and operations are introduced. Students gain experience with robot programming for a variety of tasks through simulations and hardware/software interfacing. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
EET 1610L

EET 1620
Advanced Robotics
3

?Continues the study of industrial and mobile robots and their applications. Topics covered include motion control devices, conveyors and parts feeder mechanisms, use of vision systems as well as other automation equipment used in manufacturing. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

EGR 1010
Fundamentals of Engineering Design
2

Surveys the use of drafting instruments and computers to generate the necessary geometry for design, analysis, and manufacturing Provides knowledge of geometric dimension and tolerance, industrial blueprint reading and the use of precision measurement tools through lecture and hands-on lab applications. 60 hours of lab are required.

EGR 1050
Introduction to Engineering and Design
2

Surveys the profession of engineering across several disciplines. Analysis and design problem-solving examples are used with hands-on activities. A design project introduces the engineering design process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Corequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 1050L

EGR 2710
Computing for Engineers
2

Introduces students to programs useful for solving engineering problems. Covers the design and implementation of algorithms and topics in computer programming: arrays, files, functions, pointers, and structured data types. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
EGR 2710L

EGR 2990
Capstone Project
3

Focuses on the completion of a term-long project that will incorporate knowledge from previous courses in design, manufacturing, materials, processes, and machining to meet customer specifications. Students will work in teams and will prepare a report and a final presentation. This is a capstone course and should be taken during the last quarter in the program.

EGR 3210
Engineering Economy I
2

Introduces the foundations of engineering economy. Students will develop an understanding and the ability to work problems that account for the time value of money, cash flow, and equivalence at different interest rates. The techniques are mastered from the basis of how an engineer in any discipline can take economic value into account in virtually any project environment. Eight factors commonly used in engineering economy computations are introduced and applied. One or more engineering alternatives are formulated to solve a problem or provide specified results. Different methods by which one or more alternatives can be evaluated economically using factors and formulas learned.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

EGR 4910
Engineering Project Management
3

Emphasizes estimating methods for bidding and scheduling jobs, project management strategies for planning and assigning work, and administrative procedures for tracking progress and changes in job requirements. Includes critical path scheduling, resource allocation, and client interfacing.

Prerequisite(s):
CE 3350, EGR 3210 or CQI 3210, EGR 3210 or EE 3130, EGR 3210 or EGR 3210, ME 3270, ME 3410

Corequisite(s):
CE 4220 or EE 4510 or ISE 3350 or ME 4310

EGR 4920
Senior Design Project
2

Continues the topics an engineering project management while using concepts from civil engineering courses. Teams of students undertake a design project, build and document it, then demonstrate and present it to a group of peers. This is a capstone course in which students use everything learned throughout the program. 60 hours of contact time are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 4910

EGR 4950
Engineering Research
3

ELECT 6010
Elective
3

ELECT 6020
Elective
3

ELECT 6030
Elective
3

EN 2010
Introduction to Entrepreneurship
3

Explores what it means to be an entrepreneur. What is involved in creating a successful entrepreneurial venture? Characteristics and traits of successful entrepreneurs are explained.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1010, MGT 1010, MKT 1110

ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 1010
College Composition I
3

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

ENG 1020
College Composition II
3

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 2050
Mass Media and Society
3

Introduces the history, technical development, and cultural impact of mass media (books, newspapers, magazines, sound recordings, radio, television, movies, the Internet, and social media, as well as the related areas of public relations and advertising). Examines social factors (i.e. economics, technology, politics, law/regulatory practices, and the consumer culture) that shape media messages. Explores the function and responsibility of mass media in a democratic society, while also analyzing the ethics, power, and influence of modern media.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

ENG 2310
Language and Culture
3

Analyzes the English language through history, considering regional variations and dialect acquisition. Students learn to appreciate language by studying language in everyday social interactions in their own lives and communities.  The relationship of linguistic variation to social and cultural identity is discussed, along with multilingualism, expressive speech, sociopolitical uses of language, censorship, and language learning and preservation.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 2410
Creative Writing
3

Introduces the fundamentals of writing for expressive purposes to students at any level of experience in creative writing. Students will produce and revise original works of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction using a workshop format. Students will also explore mentor texts in order to analyze various structures, stylistic approaches, and techniques that they will apply to their own works.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 3010
Structures of English
3

Examines contemporary English grammar, including syntactic structures and the elements of traditional grammar and their usage. This will be done by analyzing syntax, parts of speech, and other grammatical elements both independently and in context.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

ENG 4910
Senior Seminar: English and Language Arts
3

Cultivates a broad mastery of English and Language Arts content and the ability to translate theoretical principles into practical applications. Students must assess their knowledge of English and Language Arts subject matter; identify, remediate, and evaluate growth in weak areas; and integrate and apply the full spectrum of knowledge across the English and Language Arts curriculum. Students must distinguish themselves as analytic and reflective problem solvers in the examination of the history, scholarly literature, issues, standards, and the professional community of English and Language Arts educators.

FBM 1110
Food Culture and Introduction to Wine
3

Provides a study of the history, anthropology, and culture of food and beverage. This class includes an overview of the subject of wine, from vineyard to bottle and bottle to table. A basic understanding of the general principles of wine pairing and wine service is presented as well. This is a 90 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

FBM 1210
Culinary Fundamentals
4

Covers the basic fundamentals and methods of cooking for the food service manager. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
CUL 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
FBM 1210L

FBM 1310
Accounting for Food and Beverage Managers
3

Lays the foundation on which the student's ability to manage the daily financial health of his/her restaurant is built. Basic accounting skills of sales and cost management are practiced within a restaurant structured financial system. This is a lecture only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1150

FBM 2210
Menu Planning and Analysis
3

Introduces students to various aspects of menu development. Students will create a restaurant concept and develop a menu appropriate to the theme. Students will utilize industry specific mathematics to cost menus and analyze a variety of menu styles. This is a lecture only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

FBM 2310
Hospitality Financial Management
3

Includes an overview of accounting management and how accounting is used to collect and organize data on a daily basis in the food service industry. This is a lecture only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
FBM 1310

FBM 2410
Food and Beverage Management
3

Focuses on the development of leadership skills and personnel management. Content includes understanding management styles, developing front of the house and back of the house teams, staffing, and human resource management. This is a lecture only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1010

FBM 2550
Beer Styles and Service
4

Introduces a variety of different beer styles and outlines proper service techniques. Students in the class will also receive hands-on experience in brewing, brewing equipment, beer ingredients, and beer and food pairing. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

FBM 2610
Liquor Identification and Mixolo y
4

Teaches how to identify the various forms of alcohol, as well as how to create various classic and original cocktails. This is a 120 hour lab course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

FBM 2810
Restaurant Operations
4

Provides students with a hands-on management opportunity; focusing on guest needs, customer service, cost controls, and marketing. Team member training and development, performance coaching and team building is also modeled and practiced. This is a lab only course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 2250, FBM 2410

FIN 1010
Personal Finance
3

Provides a balanced exposure to development and understanding the various aspects involved in managing one's personal finance.

FIN 3010
Principles of Finance
3

Covers working capital management, capital budgeting issues, a study of the time value of money, financial statement analyses, valuation of financial instruments, term structure of interest rates, and analyses of short- and long-term capital markets.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 1020, MTH 1050 or ACC 1020, MTH 1110

FIN 3150
Risk Management
3

Examines the all-encompassing nature of pure risk on the individual, business, and society; illustrating ways in which risk management plans can be implemented. Exposure to this content enables students to deal with various situations where there is uncertainty about the outcome and that the possibility exists for an unfavorable outcome.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3250
Banking and Financial Institutions
3

Focuses on the monetary system; introduction to the financial markets; and regional and national banking institutions including thrifts, savings and loans, credit unions, brokerage firms, insurance companies, investment companies, and money center banks.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3410
Credit Analysis and Commercial Lending
3

Introduces students to credit analysis, credit bureaus, credit ratings, and to the differences between personal and commercial credit. Students receive exposure to how lines of credit are determined as well as various methods individuals and businesses can use to procure funds.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 3550
Financial Markets
3

Examines the development of modern financial markets with emphasis on the factors that determine interest rates, pricing mechanisms for fixed-income securities, and private and public raising of financial capital.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3010

FIN 4010
Personal Financial Planning
3

Provides a comprehensive analysis of a financial portfolio including defining the purpose and the individual investments included within that portfolio to assess whether financial goals can/are being met. Students will work to specify realistic financial goals given available resources. Students will gain an awareness of the resources available and sources of income used to obtain the financial goals, as well as an understanding of the risk/reward ratio of each investment alternative.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 3550

FIN 4510
International Financial Management
3

Introduces students to investing in non-domestic securities or assets as another way to diversify a portfolio or holdings. Students will explore the various risks--political, exchange rates, foreign taxation, and different reporting methods--that are inherent in international investing. Since foreign investment returns are not correlated with US returns, hedging and various market instabilities can offer unique opportunities for portfolio diversification and will be explored.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4010

FIN 4610
Investment Management
3

Acquaints students with the various investment alternatives and examines the advantages and disadvantages of each. Students will be given the opportunity to assess and evaluate investment alternatives using various techniques including fundamental and technical analysis, risk/reward models, and diversification.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4010

FIN 4710
Financial Statement Analysis
3

Explores the use of fundamental financial analysis and valuation techniques when evaluating the balance sheet, income statement, and cash flows statement. The focus of this course is on financial data that can be analyzed to assist in investment, commercial lending, or other economic decisions.

Corequisite(s):
FIN 4510, FIN 4610

FIN 4910
Finance Seminar
3

Integrates material from previous finance courses through practical application of analysis and assessment of financial markets, corporate financing, and personal financial planning. This is a capstone course for the Bachelor of Business Administration - Finance degree program.

Prerequisite(s):
FIN 4710

GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

GEO 1010
Human Geography
3

Studies the various cultural landscapes created by man around the globe. Such landscapes include patterns in agriculture, urban development, populations, economics, languages, religions, and others. This course provides the student with an overview of many different cultures and the opportunity to compare the cultures to their own culture.

GEO 1110
Physical Geography
3

Studies the natural environment, which is important to people and their activities, and how the physical elements of geography affect people. Presents maps and physical features, earth-sun-moon relationships, earth materials, land forms, drainage, and major natural resources. Introduces the character, causes, significance, and distribution of weather, climate, soils, and vegetation.

HIS 3410
United States History to 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history from the pre-colonial period to 1877. This course examines how the nation evolved and studies how the past has created a distinctive American character that continues to have an impact on the nation and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3410
United States History to 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history from the pre-colonial period to 1877. This course examines how the nation evolved and studies how the past has created a distinctive American character that continues to have an impact on the nation and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3420
United States History Since 1877
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in American history since 1877. This course examines American domestic history and analyzes how and why the United States became a global power. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3410

HIS 3510
World History I
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from early human beginnings to c.300 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3520
World History II
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.300 CE to c.1500 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3510

HIS 3530
World History III
3

Investigates major events, developments, and themes in world history from c.1500 CE to c. 1789 CE, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
HIS 3520

HIS 3540
World History IV
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in world history from c.1789 CE to the present, including discussion of some historiographical interpretations of the period.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 3610
Michigan History
3

Investigates major events, developments and themes in Michigan history from the pre-colonial period to the present. Analyzes the contributions of prominent Michiganians, and the relationship between the history of Michigan, the United States, and the world. Includes discussion of some historiographical interpretations of Michigan history.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HIS 4910
Senior Seminar: History and Social Studies
3

Examines the philosophy of history as a discipline, some varieties of history, the relationship of history to the other social studies content areas, historical methods of research and interpretation, the utility and applications of history, and some major historiographical debates in United States and world history. Serves as the capstone course for the history and social studies program.

HIT 1010
Healthcare Delivery Systems
3

Provides an in-depth study of the health information management profession, opportunities and career options in health information, health care delivery systems, health care reimbursement overview, and accreditation and certification applicable to health records, including paper/hybrid/EHR formats; storage. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, SCI 1210

Corequisite(s):
HIT 1310

HIT 1110
Health Data Content and Structure
3

Provides an in-depth study of origin, use, content and structure of health records, including paper/hybrid/EHR formats; storage and retrieval systems; numbering and filing systems; documentation requirements; forms and screens designs and content; use and structure of healthcare data and data sets; and how these components relate to primary and secondary record systems. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 1010

HIT 1310
Legal and Ethical Issues
3

Provides an in-depth study of current legal and ethical issues applicable to health information, including HIPAA Privacy and Security Rules. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
HIT 1010

HIT 2010
Healthcare Data Analytics and Statistics
3

Provides an in-depth study of health statistics (sources, definitions, collection, reporting, presentation, and analysis of data using relevant tools, i.e. Excel). Special projects, policies, and procedures will be used to enhance the student's ability to analyze healthcare data. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 1110

HIT 2110
Coding I ICD
3

Emphasizes basic coding guidelines and conventions of ICD-10-CM/PCS. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 1110, HSC 1250, HSC 2610, SCI 1210

HIT 2120
Coding II ICD
3

Application of advanced ICD-10-CM/PCS coding guidelines and conventions. Projects will include the hands-on coding of actual medical records and computerized coding systems. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 2110

Corequisite(s):
HIT 2130

HIT 2130
Coding III CPT
3

Emphasizes basic coding guidelines and conventions of CPT/HCPCS. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 2110

Corequisite(s):
HIT 2120

HIT 2210
Clinical Quality Management
3

Introduces the principles of quality assessment and risk management processes, while providing a framework for analyzing data. Students will be introduced to federal, state, local, and accrediting agency requirements. Students will participate in simulated quality assessment activities. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 1110

HIT 2310
Health Information Management
1

Introduces students to the fundamentals of health information governance for use in strategic planning. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 2010

Corequisite(s):
HIT 2350

HIT 2350
Reimbursement Methodologies
1

Examines the use of coded data and health information in reimbursement and payment systems appropriate to all healthcare settings. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 2010, HIT 2110

Corequisite(s):
HIT 2120, HIT 2310

HIT 2410
Organization and Leadership
3

Introduces the principles of organization to develop effective skills in management, leadership, motivation, and team-building techniques. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HIT 1110

HIT 2510
Health Information Technology Professional Practice Experience
2

Provides students with a 120-hour, supervised, learning experience in a healthcare facility. Through this unpaid capstone work experience, students will perform health information functions, procedures, and interact with professionals in the healthcare field. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

HIT 2910
RHIT Review
2

Provides students with a review of all content areas in preparation for the AHIMA National Certification Examination. This is the curriculum capstone course. Must complete with a B- or better.

HRM 3010
Staffing Human Resources
3

Studies the challenges of a comprehensive staffing model that identifies all the key components of staffing, external influences, and staffing system management. Major areas covered are the staffing model, external influences (economic, laws and regulations), staffing strategy and planning, job analysis, measurement, external and internal recruitment, selection, decision making, and the final match.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

HRM 3110
Compensating Human Resources
3

Examines a variety of compensation methods and their relationships to organizational strategies, pay structures, and employee performance. Topics include total rewards, design of pay levels, benefit options, compensating special groups, cost management, and administration.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

HRM 3150
Performance Management of Human Resources
3

Provides a comprehensive analysis of how human resource management facilitates the process of how employees are evaluated within an organization through the development of appraisal systems, measurement tools, and the roles of feedback and coaching training and development. This course will also examine how the functions of human resources align with the organization's core values, goals and strategy while supporting an organization in the execution of its mission and vision and how to while measuring human resources effectiveness.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

Corequisite(s):
HRM 3410

HRM 3410
Training and Developing Human Resources
3

Examines the various aspects of training and development of employees in the workforce. Covered topics include: orientation, strategic training, needs assessments, learning theories, new training technologies, employee career development, and career management.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

HRM 4010
Human Resources and Employment Law
3

Provides an introduction to employment law and labor law for a non-legal professional in human resource management and/or labor relations.

Prerequisite(s):
LAW 2110

HRM 4150
Human Resource Information Systems and Metrics
3

Studies all aspects of using HR data and analytics for enterprise management and decision making. Includes analysis of data needs for selection and management of HRIS software. Also explores various quantitative and qualitative metrics including trend and ratio analysis, yield rations, ROI, absenteeism, turnover, EVA, benchmarking, HR scorecards, and forecasting.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

Corequisite(s):
MGT 3210

HRM 4350
International Human Resource Management
3

Examines how global human resource management practices within a global context is distinctive from domestic human resource management. Students will analyze the challenges that multinational corporations are confronted with, which include cultural, political, social, and legal issues; the level of managerial skill and education; technological development in the host country. Issues such as expatriation versus local management, selecting and preparing for international assignments, cultural adaptation at the individual and system level, and the influence of globalization on future HRM practices are also examined.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2110

HRM 4510
Employee and Labor Relations
3

Studies all aspects of effective employee and labor relations including managing organizational culture and retention, employee motivation and rewards, employee engagement, conflict management and dispute resolution, employee discipline and terminations, union/management relations, the collective bargaining process, negotiation skills, grievance management, and unfair labor practices.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 4010, MGT 2110

HRM 4910
Strategic Human Resource Management
3

Focuses on the way strategies can be formed and enacted in organizations and on the internal and external environmental contexts from which human resource strategies emerge. Students will be given the opportunity to enhance their analytical skills in organizational analysis and strategic thinking through case studies. Students will be provided with opportunities to synthesize managerial strategy issues with HRM processes, in a considered and reflective manner. This is the capstone course in the Human Resource Management program.

Prerequisite(s):
HRM 4010, MGT 2110

Corequisite(s):
HRM 4350

HSC 1010
Introduction to Health Professions
2

Provides students with a foundation for college success, as well as the exploration of various health professions and tools for career planning. Emphasizes concepts of professionalism, health care ethics and confidentiality as well as an introduction to electronic health records (EHR) and relevant medical terminology.

HSC 1110
Introduction to Healthcare
3

Acquaints students with a variety of perspectives about existing healthcare systems. A particular emphasis on the complexity of the American healthcare system will be made. Comparisons with other health care delivery models and national trends will be discussed. Current events are incorporated throughout this course.

HSC 1210
Human Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1211

HSC 1210
Anatomy and Physiology I
3

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1211
Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1211
Anatomy and Physiology I Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1220
Human Anatomy and Physiology II
3

Focuses on the physiology of the body system on a cellular level and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1221

HSC 1221
Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1221
Anatomy and Physiology II Lab
1

Accompanies the course with the same number. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

HSC 1250
Introduction to Disease
3

Introduces students to the fundamental aspects of the study of diseases. Emphasis will be on the definition, etiology, diagnosis, and treatment of specific diseases. This course will concentrate on clinical abstracting from the medical record.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

HSC 1810
Acoustical Physics
4

Presents the fundamental principles of acoustical physics. This course will cover acoustical properties, instrumentation, transducer types and characteristics, Doppler principles, and biological effects.

HSC 1850
Introduction to Sonography and Patient Care
3

Exposes allied health students to basic concepts of patient care that will confront them in the medical setting. Theory and practice will include such areas as medical ethics, legal concepts, infection control, microbiology, history taking, vital signs, dealing with emergencies, and patient positioning and transfer methods. Emphasis on the total patient is presented with regards to the patient's physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs.

HSC 2150
Pathophysiology
3

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

Corequisite(s):
HSC 1220

HSC 2210
Nutrition
3

Teaches students how the logic of science is applied to basic nutrition concerns, including food groups and recommended nutritional guidelines.

HSC 2310
Biochemistry
3

Provides an overview of biochemical structures and reactions that occur in living systems. Emphasis is placed on the areas of energy, proteins, and catalysis as well as metabolism and molecular genetics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

HSC 2410
Microbiology
3

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A laboratory may be taken concurrently with the lecture course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2411

HSC 2411
Microbiology Lab
1

Laboratory is to be taken concurrently with the lecture course, Microbiology. Students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. This course will explore basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, epidemiology, physical and chemical control of microorganisms and identification of microorganisms. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2410

HSC 2610
Basic Pharmacology
3

Provides a theoretical foundation for the fundamental principles and concepts of pharmacotherapeutics and classification of drugs. A grade of B- or better must be maintained to satisfactorily complete this course.

HSC 2650
Cardiovascular Pharmacology
1

Provides theoretical foundation for the fundamental principles and concepts of pharmacotherapies and drug classifications. This course will focus on the drugs the sonographer will most likely encounter in the cardiovascular patient population.

HSC 2710
Clinical Kinesiology
4

Covers the application of basic physics principles and advanced human anatomy as it pertains to the study of human movement. Emphasizes biomechanics, arthrokinematics, palpation, functional anatomy, and therapeutic principles. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 2710L

HSC 3110
Health Law and Regulations
3

Addresses legal issues, restraints, and problems arising from organization and delivery of healthcare services. Topics to be included are: tort law; hospital, physician, nurse, and other health professional's liability; informed consent; medical records; legal reporting obligations; abortion; autopsy, donation and experimentation; sterilization and artificial insemination; euthanasia; patient rights and responsibilities; labor relation; insurance; trial procedures; and restraint of trade are topics which are included.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

Corequisite(s):
HSC 3150

HSC 3150
Planning and Evaluation of Health Services
3

Researches and examines the steps to planning, implementation, and evaluation of health services. Includes the development of measurable objectives and the compilation and presentation of a report.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110

Corequisite(s):
HSC 3110

HSC 3810
Neuroanatomy
3

Gives students a base of knowledge of the organizing principles of human neural structure and function. Upon completion of the course, students should have a good foundation for future clinical or other advanced courses in neuroscience.

HSC 4010
Healthcare Administration
3

Studies the basic principles of healthcare administration including planning, organizing, staffing, directing, and controlling. The emphasis will be on administration of hospitals, organizational structure, trustee responsibility, medical staff relationships, third-party payors, and fiscal management.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

Corequisite(s):
HSC 4210, HSC 4310

HSC 4110
Seminar in Health Issues
3

Studies current healthcare issues such as managed care, health insurance, foreign healthcare systems, and the policies of healthcare. Individual or group projects will be a component of this course.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 4010, HSC 4210, HSC 4310, HSC 3150

Corequisite(s):
WRK 4410

HSC 4210
Ethics for Health Professionals
3

Examines the current ethical issues in the healthcare system. Problems and conflicts posed by interpersonal, professional, and client relationships as well as business considerations will be discussed. Ethical issues explored may include right to live, right to die, transplants, informed consent, sterilization, abortion, and human experimentation.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

Corequisite(s):
HSC 4010, HSC 4310

HSC 4310
Health System Finance
3

Examines basic accounting principles and finance in healthcare settings. Considerations in budgetary preparation will be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150

Corequisite(s):
HSC 4010, HSC 4210

HUM 1010
Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)
3

Enhances the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

HUM 1020
Art and Architecture II (Renaissance to Modern)
3

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Renaissance period to the present are studied.

HUM 3610
Art Appreciation
3

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

HUM 3650
Music Appreciation
3

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HUS 1010
Introduction to Human Services
3

Serves as an overview of the historical developments in the field of human service and provides an introduction to the philosophical framework, the major theoretical models, and the interdisciplinary nature of human service. Students will explore human service occupations, professional organizations, community resources, and ethical and legal issues. Must complete with a C or better.

HUS 1210
Family Dynamics
3

Explores family systems concepts and diversity within family systems, culturally and relationally. Provides students with a foundation of knowledge and skills for building strong relationships and families, with an emphasis on family strengths and benefits that come from diversity. The concepts and ideas presented are directly applicable to students’ lives as well as their future professional work. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher to qualify for internship.

HUS 1410
Abuse and Neglect in the Family
3

Explores the etiology, prevalence, and treatment of different types of neglect and violence in families across the lifespan. This course will explore abusive and neglectful behaviors, evidence of signs and symptoms of neglect and abusive patterns, and identify appropriate reporting procedures. Must complete with a C or better.

HUS 1510
Ethics and Issues in Human Services
3

Assists the Human Services student to advocate and understand the interests, ethical dilemmas, and potential ethical violation(s) issues of our client/consumer (and the Human Services Professional) populations, i.e. children, teen/youths, adults, elderly, and other. This course will look into the rights of our client populations/systems from a Generalist Human Services approach, the rights of our society in the legal system and the mental health system that we sometimes work within. This course reviews the roles and responsibilities of our clients/consumers and our responsibility to them, the conditions that we have to work inside of, and potential violations that can happen in the field.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 1010, PSY 1110

HUS 2010
Substance Abuse
3

Explores the types of substance abuse prevalent in communities, factors that lead to substance abuse and the impact on families, the workplace, and society in general. This course introduces students to current treatment programs and their various philosophies. Must complete with a C or better.

HUS 2110
Assessment, Recording, and Reporting
3

Teaches students how to conduct a client assessment, including interviewing and appropriate manual- and computer-based recording and reporting of client records into an organized and comprehensive assessment report. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2010

Corequisite(s):
PSY 2410

HUS 2210
Case Management I
3

Emphasizes prevention and intervention strategies for less severe cases in human services. Students will learn parenting skills, listening skills, planning, assessment of community resources, referral procedures, general crisis intervention, and setting appropriate boundaries in his/her role as a case manager. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2110

Corequisite(s):
HUS 2350

HUS 2350
Trauma Informed Care in Crisis Intervention
3

Emphasizes the assessment of diverse crisis situations brought on by past trauma with emphasis on the use of short-term intervention and problem solving techniques to help individuals and families de-escalate crisis situations and develop appropriate coping techniques. The course will address principles of trauma informed care, brief and short-term interventions, and multicultural issues in trauma/crisis intervention situations. This course includes 70 hours of required experiential credit. Students who completed HUS371A in the quarter format will have an alternative assignment to the 70 experiential hours.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 1410

Corequisite(s):
HUS 2210

HUS 2610
Theory of Group Dynamics for Human Services
3

Familiarizes students with the principles and theories of group dynamics, the purpose of a group, types of groups, and roles within a group. Students will discuss the ethical issues that may occur in a group setting as well as the impact of diversity within groups. Various stages of group development will be explored while students acquire necessary skills for group facilitation.

HUS 2710
Human Services Internship I
3

Consists of 180 clock hours of paid/unpaid, experience in a social service or mental health agency in the community under supervision of agency and Baker College staff. The students will also be required to complete 20 hours in seminar format, to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. This course is the beginning internship required of all human service majors in both the associate and bachelor degree programs. The primary focus of this internship is the development and application of knowledge and skills in community resources. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, HUS 1010, HUS 2350

HUS 2920
Family Support Strategies
3

Develops specific skills to support and strengthen families, including interviewing and communication skills, assessing family needs and strengths, eliciting relevant cultural information, formulation of family support plans and appropriate outcomes, problem-solving strategies, recordkeeping, making referrals, and resolving ethical dilemmas. The approach is a family-centered, solution-focused model of integrated family services. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 1210

HUS 3010
Research Methods in Human Services
3

Examines research and theory within the human services community. For students to become a consumer of research, topics such as grant writing, ethics in research, research design and application, and using research results in a variety of human services communities will be addressed. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2110, MTH 2750

HUS 3510
Child Welfare Services
3

Introduces students to a survey of child welfare services. Topics include family support, protecting abused and neglected children, foster care, delinquency, adoption, and family court process. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 1410

HUS 3610
Application and Practice of Group Dynamics for Human Services
3

Allows the student to engage in intensive self-discovery, interact with others in a group setting, develop and utilize group terminology, analyze group processes, and articulate their thoughts, refine concepts and continue to develop interpersonal and communication skills. The design of this course will encompass lectures and extensive experiential learning to strengthen needed skills.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2610

HUS 4110
Institutional Treatment and Alternative Settings in Human Services
3

Provides a comprehensive examination of various placement and treatment environments from the most restrictive setting to independent living. In addition, introduces students to the theories and principles encompassed within home visitation. This course considers diagnostic criteria and a variety of conditions under which institutional placement and other treatment alternatives are indicated relative to particular case situations and case monitoring of clients in these settings. The course also identifies the attributes and administrative aspects of home visitation and the safety and occupational hazards associated with it. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2210

HUS 4120
Case Management II - Working With Diverse Populations
3

Emphasizes prevention and intervention strategies for more severe cases. Students will learn how to coordinate interventions for clients with multiple and complex problems, determine when to make referrals to social and legal agencies, facilitate the reintegration of families, intervene in crisis situations, and conduct evaluations for licensing of alternative home placements. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2210

HUS 4210
Human Services Administration
3

Introduces students to human service management and administration at the first-line, middle, and upper management levels. Students will attain an understanding of organizational management perspectives on staff motivation and administrative planning, including a review of professional and governmental agency standards. This course also presents an evaluation and analysis of major components in human service delivery systems, including budgeting, program evaluation, employee relations, in-service training programs, and collaboration among agencies and organizations. Must complete with a C (73%) or better to qualify for an internship.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 1010

HUS 4310
The DSM System and Mental Health Services
3

Introduces students to the diagnostic system for the classification of mental disorders and explores the major categories of mental disorders. Students will learn to differentiate various forms of psychopathology, evaluate alternative interventions, and develop proficiency in the language used by a variety of professionals to communicate about mental health and human services problems. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 3110

HUS 4710
Human Services Internship II
3

Consists of 180 clock hours of paid/unpaid, experience in a social service or mental health agency in the community under the supervision of agency and Baker College staff. The students will also be required to complete 20 hours in seminar format, to integrate learning in the field with classroom instruction. This is the second and final internship required for all Human Service bachelor degree students. The primary focus of this internship is the development of knowledge and skills in treatment planning and intervention. Students will observe and participate in the treatment planning process and assist in the implementation of interventions and preventions with process and outcome documentation. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
HUS 2710

IND 1010
Introduction to Interior Design
3

Introduces personal skills and resources needed to become a professional interior designer. Students utilize visual and creative skills to develop functional designs for interior spaces. Study focuses on: basic elements and principles of design, space planning, color theory, lighting, furniture arrangement, surface materials and portfolio building. Visual and oral presentation skills are introduced to prepare students for client presentations.

IND 1050
Textiles
3

Generates an understanding of the textile industry and of the products the textile industry produces. Students learn to analyze and identify natural and synthetic fibers, the methods of construction and finishing of fabric, and the properties of fabric for its intended end uses.

IND 1110
Introduction to Residential Desi n
3

Applies basic theory of proxemics and human behavior to the design of residential facilities. Study includes advanced space planning and furniture arrangements. Projects incorporate kitchen and bath elevations and layouts. Students will research and specify finish materials and furnishings.

IND 1150
Interior Design Graphics
3

Introduces basic drafting skills necessary to create construction drawings. This course is essential for a basic understanding of proper use and application of drafting equipment. Students apply proper lettering, linework, and dimensioning techniques to floor plans, isometric drawings, and perspective drawings.

IND 1210
Rendering Techniques and Perspectives
3

Helps students develop an individual rendering style, produce perspective drawings with an emphasis on ideation drawings. Projects will bring another dimension to work possibly begun in previous classes.

IND 1410
Workroom Practices
3

Offers a basic study of materials and components used in interior design. Focuses on selection, specification, and calculation of surface materials, drapery, and cabinetry.

IND 2010
History of Furnishings
3

Generates an understanding of furniture styles throughout history and helps students to understand the relationship of period furniture and architectural styles to today's trends.

IND 2110
Introduction to Commercial Design
3

Involves students in in-depth explorations of non-residential environments such as restaurants or bistros and retail such as boutiques. Students would concentrate on project management including problem identification, client and user needs, and information gathering and analysis for space planning.

IND 2310
Building Systems
3

Emphasizes residential design and blueprint reading. Students will obtain technical skills in residential building systems, codes, and construction. Students will also be exposed to methods of detailing and material usage, and examine mechanical and electrical systems including HVAC, plumbing, electrical, fire protection, and vertical transportation.

IND 2410
Studio Kitchen and Bath
3

Applies design principles and presentation standards in the planning and designing of kitchens and bathrooms. Following NKBA guidelines, students study proper application and construction techniques incorporating electrical and plumbing fixtures. Cabinet selection and proper layout guidelines will be covered. Projects include manual and computer-generated drawings using 20-20 design software.

IND 2510
Interior Design Business Practices
3

Provides an in-depth study of the business of interior design and the essentials for conducting a successful design practice. Also acquaints students with the basic principles of effective sales techniques critical to the interior design industry for both residential and commercial projects. Topics include application of the programming process, problem solving and critical thinking, teamwork, networking, and presentation in the sales process. Students will explore diverse approaches to selling design concepts, services, and products.

IND 2610
Introduction to Design Software
3

Introduces concepts of basic AutoCAD to students providing them with a foundation to move to greater productivity with the software in subsequent CAD courses and expand student's kitchen and bath design capability through the use of 20/20 Design software.

IND 2650
Interior Design CAD
3

Introduces students to the use of the computer in the creation of drawings in place of traditional drafting methods. Students will create and edit drawings using computer software for interior design

IND 2910
Portfolio Projects
3

Explores the initial assembly of design portfolios through the use of Photoshop as an enhancement tool. Students will be required to submit a portfolio sutiable for interviews. Resume and cover letters will be addressed as students are encouraged to begin employment opportunities.

IND 3010
Building Codes and Construction
3

Studies residential and commercial construction techniques and their applicable codes for accessibility, fire protection, and life safety.

IND 3110
Architectural Design
3

Explores wood frame structures as they relate to multi-family, office, or small commercial structures. Drawing projects will focus on completion of a full set of working drawings. Introduces use of REVIT software.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 2650

IND 3120
Commercial Architectural Design I
3

Explores commercial structures featuring steel, masonry and concrete construction. Drawings will focus on one of the following: an office building, a retail store, restaurant, or school-institutional building. Students will complete a set of working drawings and material take-offs.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 2650

IND 3130
Commercial Architectural Design II
3

Continues exploring reinforced concrete structures - featuring steel, masonry, and concrete construction. Drawings will focus on one of the following: an office building, a retail store, restaurant, or school-institutional building. Students will complete a set of working drawings, material take-offs, and specifications.

Prerequisite(s):
IND 2650

IND 3210
Advanced Rendering Techniques an d Perspectives
3

Involves individual and team exploration, with an emphasis on problem solving, through varying types of rendering design typologies, ideation, and sketching. This class helps students to develop an individual rendering style, enhanced visual communication ability, and reinforces skills in 3-dimensional drawing techniques. Students will further develop their creative thinking by exploration of a variety of approaches and concepts with originality and elaboration.

IND 3310
3-D Modeling
3

Explores the presentation of design solutions in 3D form with emphasis on model making. Sketch up software will be utilized.

IND 3410
Universal and Sustainable Design
3

Develops the student's ability to apply universal design principles through the design of the built environment to enhance the function for all individuals, regardless of their abilities. Students will also gain understanding of the effects that aging, injury, and disabilities have on the home and work environments. This course will combine essential knowledge of sustainable building concepts that are fundamental to all LEED Rating systems. Students will be exposed to the basics of the USGBC LEED building certification process and will apply LEED design concepts to a project. Completion of this course is one component in pursuit of the LEED Green Associate exam.

IND 3610
Designing for Healthcare
3

Concentrates on the specialized intricacies of the healthcare environment with a focus on identifying and implementing safe, maintainable products, finishes, and space planning in healthcare facilities. Students will research the emotional and psychological impact of the environment on all stakeholders.

IND 3910
Integrated Design Studio
3

Concentrates on research, creating conceptual diagrams and sketches, and utilizing current trends in technology to generate entries for national and regional interior design competitions.

IND 4010
Lighting Design
3

Meets the interior designer's need for education in lighting and electrical systems along with related equipment, terminology, and calculation methods.

IND 4210
Historical Preservation
3

Applies the study of historical art and architecture to appropriate design period. Topics include strategies for identifying local community restoration and preservation efforts and current restoration planning techniques and procedures. Posed with a restoration problem-solving scenario, students will prepare a project restoration plan.

IND 4310
Commercial Design I
3

Introduces students to the exam for licensing using practicums and materials from NCIDQ. This course will include a capstone design project that will require code compliance and specifications.

IND 4320
Commercial Design II
3

Involves students in an in-depth exploration of systems furniture in corporate and office environments including the relationship between human behavior and the built environment. Students will concentrate on problem identification, client and user needs, and information gathering research and analysis for the corporate and office environments.

IND 4990
Senior Design Portfolio
3

Concentrates on existing portfolios by adding work completed during the bachelor program and enhancing work by utilizing Photoshop skills. Students will be encouraged to enhance job search methods and set professional goals.

ISE 2110
Manufacturing Processes
3

Studies the relationship between product engineering and manufacturing engineering. Casting processes, bulk deformation processes, sheet metal processes, mechanics of material removal processes, non-traditional machining, plastics and powder metallurgy, fastening and joining methods, design for manufacturing, and the factory of the future are covered. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ISE 2110L

ITS 1110
Introduction to Information Systems Security
3

Provides students with a background in information security, security management, and the technical components of security. Students will be given an overview of the entire field of information security: the history, the terminology, and the management aspects of information security programs with sufficient detail to facilitate an understanding of information security systems and their management.

ITS 2110
Introduction to Network Security
3

Provides students with a strong foundation in network security concepts, along with analysis and design of these systems. It is a preparatory course in network security methodologies and helps prepare students for the CompTIA Security+ certification examination. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 2110L

ITS 2210
VPN Firewall
3

Prepares students to protect private networks from external security threats through the use of firewall systems. Discusses security holes in common Internet services and how to proactively defend against external attacks. Discusses the philosophies of firewall design, access lists, authentication, and general security policy. Covers a wide variety of firewall systems over multiple operating systems. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 2110

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 2210L

ITS 2310
Linux I
3

Provides an introduction to Linux/Unix, its history, characteristics, and system basics from a user's perspective. The following concepts are introduced: basic file structures; navigational tools; file manipulation tools; file permissions and access; 'vi' editor basics; remote terminal emulation; mail; shell fundamentals; quoting and special characters; filename generation; input/output redirection; pipelines; multitasking and input arguments. Students will demonstrate the ability to use Linux/Unix commands at the command-line level. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 2310L

ITS 2320
Linux II
3

Prepares students for the LPIC-1 Certification Exam utilizing the Cisco Networking Academy (CNA), NDG Linux 1 Course. This certification as an introductory certification for people who want to enter careers involving Linux. The exam is meant to certify that an individual has the skills necessary to install, operate, and troubleshoot a Linux system and is familiar with Linux-specific concepts and basic hardware. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 2310

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 2320L

ITS 2330
Linux III
3

prepare students for the LPIC-1 Second Certification Exam utilizing the Cisco Networking Academy (CNA), NDG Linux II Course. This certification is the second of a two part certification for people who want to enter careers involving Linux. The exam is meant to certify that an individual has the skills necessary to perform Linux maintenance tasks on the Command Line, Linux installation and configuration, and Basic networking, and Security configuration. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 2320

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 2330L

ITS 3050
Security Policies and Auditing
3

Discusses the key structure elements and terms of written information protection policy and reviews some typical policy contents. Prepares students to develop the related standards, procedures, and guidelines for implementing the policy. Evaluates the tools needed to select, develop, and apply a security program that meets business goals. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 2110

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 3050L

ITS 3150
Information Systems Threat Assessment
3

Prepares students to assess and then correct the vulnerabilities present within information systems. Details methods and tools used in attacks and discusses countermeasures. Discusses available security resources. Analyzes attack types. Specifically covers intrusion detection systems. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 3150L

ITS 3210
Legal and Ethical Issues in Information Technology
3

Explores legal and ethical issues faced in the information technology field. Students will learn about ethical issues within an organization as they relate to relationships internally as well as with customers, partners, and society. In addition, students will learn of current legal issues in information technology such as intellectual property, privacy rules, and legislative actions. Exploration of the impact of these issues on current and proposed technical strategies will help prepare students to provide influence with regard to legal and ethical issues they will face in today's organizations.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 2110

ITS 3250
Securing Systems
3

Prepares students to understand the inherent vulnerabilities of a variety of systems including Windows and Linux/UNIX, and proactively defend against attacks on these systems. Covers defense strategies through understanding of system and file permissions, password and account security, the Windows Registry, Malware prevention, encryption, and Directory Service management via policies. Discusses hardening of network operating systems and remote network access through a detailed survey of built-in security tools and third party utilities. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

Corequisite(s):
ITS 3150

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 3250L

ITS 3310
Designing for Security
3

Provides students with concepts needed for creating secure networks and systems requiring advanced planning. Once networks or systems are open to either the Internet or an internal user base, they are exposed to threats ranging from viruses to outright destruction. Therefore, designing these systems and networks with an understanding of their function and security needs before being exposed to these threats will provide information with its best defense. The objectives of this course are to create a framework to define the needed functions of the network or systems and ensure that secure methods are used to provide these tools. This course will focus on the use of tools to update these functions to continue to provide secure services. Finally, this course will also explore sites and services that can be used to discover new exploits and methods to secure them, and tools used by security professionals to audit the vulnerability of the network and systems. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 3310L

ITS 3410
Scripting for Network Administrators
3

Introduces scripting language and its environment. Students will build scripts and utilities to automate system tasks and create powerful system management tools to handle the day-to-day tasks that drive a system administrator's life. The course covers batch scripting, secure scripting and string processing. Students will also learn how to automate the scripting of security related functions. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 3410L

ITS 4050
Internet and Web Security
3

Prepares students to understand Web and Internet security from an administrator, developer, and end user's perspective. Covers topics regarding website security, including SSL encryption and web authentication. Examines risks that threaten a site and hardware and software tools available to protect against hacking, port scanning, and denial-of-service attacks. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3250

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 4050L

ITS 4150
Firewall Concepts
3

Prepares students to protect private networks from external security threats through the use of firewall systems. Discusses security holes in common Internet services and how to proactively defend against external attacks. Discusses the philosophies of firewall design, access lists, authentication, and general security policy. Covers a wide variety of firewall systems over multiple operating systems.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

ITS 4210
Access Control Authentication and PKI
3

Defines the components of access control, provides a business framework for implementation, and discusses legal requirements that impact access control programs. It looks at the risks, threats, and vulnerabilities prevalent in information systems and IT infrastructures and how to handle them. It provides a resource that details how to put access control systems to work as well as testing and managing them. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3310

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 4210L

ITS 4250
Computer Forensics and Investigation
3

Provides students with an overview of computer forensics, operating systems and how they function. Students are introduced to forensic tools along with concepts such as chain of custody and documentation of evidence/procedures. Students learn how to act as an expert witness if needed to appear at a trial. The outcomes of this course map to the International Association of Computer Investigative Specialists certification (IACIS). 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 4250L

ITS 4350
Disaster Recovery
3

Prepares students to identify risks within businesses and how to minimize loss. Discusses cost/benefit analysis of disaster recovery planning. Identifies methods for minimizing the risk of a disaster and the response tasks to be performed during a disaster. Details the development of a disaster recovery plan (DRP). 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ITS 3050

ITS 4450
Fraud Risk Assessment Tools and Investigation
3

Presents how to conduct a fraud risk assessment and gain an understanding of basic fraud concepts. Techniques to identify and assess risks are explored and executed with best practices using fraud risk assessment tools. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 4450L

ITS 4550
Fraud Prevention and Deterrence
3

Presents how to identify the risk of fraudulent schemes and deter fraud in real world scenarios both near and abroad. Techniques to control and limit fraud losses through managerial research and best practices are explored in detail. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
ITS 4550L

ITS 4910
Information Trends/Research and Design Project
3

Integrates the knowledge and skills students have obtained in this program to plan, design, and research a network security environment that would mirror a real-world environment. This course will require a written research paper, an oral presentation, and the design of a network that utilizes the concepts learned within the core and specialization minors of their degree. This is a capstone research project. Class looks at current trends within the security environment.

JNYCD 1000
Journeyman Status
27

LAW 2110
Business Law
3

Provides students with an introduction to the legal issues inherent in dynamic business environments. Topics covered include the legal system, including an examination of constitutional law; business torts; contracts; intellectual property; criminal law; and the ethical considerations for business decision making.

LAW 3110
Advanced Business Law
3

Advances the business student's knowledge of the law as it relates to topics such as sales, negotiable instruments, creditors' rights, secured transactions, bankruptcy, employment and labor laws, federal securities acts, personal property, real property, environmental law, insurance, and business ethics.

LIT 2050
Introduction to Literature: World Masterpieces and Critical Approaches
3

Explores classic foundational texts in the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction). Focuses on understanding literary elements and analyzing texts using close readings and critical literary theory in addition to the skills necessary to write literary essays. Introduces the concepts of literary analysis. Students will understand the influence of these texts in relationship to social and cultural contexts.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3110
British Literature: Beginning to Neoclassicism
3

Surveys major British writers from the Anglo-Saxon period through the eighteenth century. Students will study the major genres (poetry, drama, and fiction) and apply close reading strategies and critical literary theory to analyze texts. Students will explore various aspects of historical periods; understand how the assigned works reflect changing social, political, and religious thoughts of each period; and then compare themes from era to era.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3150
British Literature: Romanticism to Modernism
3

Surveys British literature from the Romantic (including Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, and Keats) through the Modernist period. In addition to major authors, the course will also cover British literary movements and their historical, political, and social contexts. Students will apply basic literary analysis and critical theories to their written assessments in the course, including essays and written exams.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 3310
Survey of American Literature
3

Surveys North American literature of various genres from pre-colonial times through the Modernist movement. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American voices, including Native American oral tradition. Students will critically analyze and write about literature applying proper terminology, research, and critical theories from the field of literary studies.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 4050
Young Adult Literature
3

Introduces students to literature written for and about young people. Students will read and analyze contemporary and classical middle grade and young adult literature, exploring various genres, commonly recurring themes, and defining features.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

LIT 4210
Contemporary Literature
3

Studies twentieth and twenty-first century world literature written in or translated to English. Explores historical, political, and cultural contexts in which contemporary literature is produced and received, establishing a consciousness of the functions of literature during this period. Applies a range of critical perspectives and examines recurring themes and genres. Engages students in the verbal and written analysis of complex written texts representative of the literary movements of the time.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020, LIT 2050

MA 1210
Basic Clinical and Administrative Skills
6

Introduces the foundational concepts and skills of patient centered care in the ambulatory setting. The course focus will be on infection control fundamentals, vital patient measurements, assisting with the physical examination communication skills, electronic health records usage and application, and schedule management systems. 60 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MA 1210L

MA 1250
Intermediate Administrative Skills
5

Examines the administrative medical office concepts and communication expertise associated with the healthcare financial and third party payment structure. Students will engage in professional communication and investigatory skills as it relates to accounts payable, receivable and collections. The use of the EHR and Practice management software will be an integral part of this course. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MA 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
MA 1250L

MA 1310
Dosage Math and Pharmacology
3

Introduces the fundamental principles of pharmacological concepts and practice, medication delivery methods. Students will perfect the mathematical acumen needed to properly calculate medication doses accurately. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MA 1210

Corequisite(s):
MA 1410

MA 1350
Legal Concepts
2

Focuses on the legal, ethical and bioethical aspects of medical practice, licensure, professional liability, quality assurance, and risk management along with the psychological aspects of human behaviors. Personal and professional development are integrated into the content of this course. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, HSC 1210, MA 1210

Corequisite(s):
MA 1250

MA 1410
Clinical Procedures I
5

Explores intermediate clinical practice skills expertise and techniques necessary to assist the physician with diagnostic studies, examinations, patient education, critical thinking and clinical reasoning. The medical specialties covered in this course include: female reproduction, pediatrics, male reproduction, gerontology, orthopedics, urology and minor office surgical procedures, cardiology, and pulmonology. All specialties will incorporate an anatomical and medical language review. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MA 1210

Corequisite(s):
MA 1310

Concurrent requisite(s):
MA 1410L

MA 1450
Clinical Procedures II
6

Explores advanced clinical practice skills expertise and techniques necessary to assist the physician with diagnostic studies, examinations, patient education, critical thinking and clinical reasoning. The medical specialties covered in this course include: Infectious disease processes, dermatology, gastroenterology, endocrinology, and hematology. Laboratory safety and emergency preparedness challenges will also be the focus of proficiency in this course. All specialties will incorporate an anatomical and medical language review. 60 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MA 1310, MA 1410

Concurrent requisite(s):
MA 1450L

MA 1590
Credential Review and Practicum
6

Focuses on a comprehensive review of the program content in preparation for taking the CMA (AAMA) National Certification Examination. Practice test taking techniques, professional accountability, and career readiness skills will be the focus. This is the capstone course for the Medical Assistant Program. The Practicum requires students to perform a minimum of 160 hours of unpaid work experience in a medical facility performing clinical and administrative duties. Students will engage in the Bb online format for instructive hours required during the practicum. 45 hours of lecture and 160 hours of clinical are required. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
MA 1450

Concurrent requisite(s):
MA 1590CL

MATT 1210
Integrated Systems
3

Provides entry-level students with an overview of the technology used in automated integrated systems found in manufacturing. Included is also an overview of the typical plant networks and their associated responsibility. Distributed and local control is examined. Analysis of sequencing machines is completed along with an introduction of how to troubleshoot these systems. Topics include: fluid power components, electrical components, conveyors, part sensing components and an overview of PLC control principles. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 1210L

MATT 1350
Electro-Hydraulics
3

Explains automatic control systems and electrical control concepts. It covers the principles of logic elements and functions and assembly of logic circuits. Maintenance techniques and troubleshooting components and systems will be stressed. The course is delivered using Internet accessed instructional resources and hands-on activities. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 1350L

MATT 1510
Mechanical Drives
3

Focuses on the fundamentals of Mechanical Transfer of Power. Basic concepts of mechanical power transmission by addressing the principles of power transmission, calculations of speed and force and how they affect a power transmission systems ability to perform work will be introduced. This course emphasizes the basics of mechanical drawing, safe work practices for working around machinery, common hand tools associated with maintenance work and some of the more common terms and definitions. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 1510L

MATT 1710
Industrial Safety Hoists and Cranes
2

Emphasizes educating the manufacturing industry workforce on MIOSHA and OSHA safety standards and practical safety applications. Students will review general industry and construction standards set forth by MIOSHA and OSHA with emphasis on how to administer safety standards to ensure a safe working environment for all involved. By the conclusion of the course students should be able to recognize potential hazards and identification of the permit required, confined spaces, lockout/tag out procedures, standard rigging applications, basic crane operation, and the ability to apply work-related safety and accident prevention methods. 60 hours of lab are required.

MATT 1910
Blueprint Reading
1

Introduces the fundamental drafting information necessary to retrieve, read, manipulate and understand a mechanical part print. This course requires student to be able to identify different types of prints as well as being able to analyze them. 30 hours of lab are required.

MATT 2110
Industrial Controls and Instrumentation
3

Emphasizes the controls and instrumentation and explores automation input and output devices including AC and DC motors, variable speed drives, relays, motor starters and sizing of components for various applications. Typical control circuits are examined along with component selection and control documentation. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 2110L

MATT 2210
Programmable Logic Controller Application
4

Introduces the fundamentals of Programmable Logic Controller (PLC) operations, including symbology and programming techniques. PLC hardware and data structures will be presented. Methods of using the programming interface to troubleshoot applications will be emphasized. Students will write, enter, and execute application programs using the programmable controllers and Human Machine Interface (HMI). The use of the Robotics Lab equipment will give students practical programming and troubleshooting skills used in the maintenance of automated systems. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 2110L

MATT 2220
Advanced Programmable Logic Controller Application
4

Provides students with an understanding of the relationship between real time control systems and industrial devices and machines. The advanced instruction set of programmable controllers will be studied relevant to concepts and structures of automated control systems. Various applications will be defined in which students will develop the written programs for each hardware and software specification of the process problems, including field devices, data networks, and Human Machine Interfaces (HMI). The use of the Robotics Lab equipment will give the student practical programming and troubleshooting skills used in the maintenance of automated systems. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 2220L

MATT 2350
Introduction to Gas/Arc/Mig/Tig Welding
3

Introduces students to the four basic welding processes: gas (oxyacetylene), arc (shielded metal arc welding), MIG (gas metal arc), and TIG (gas tungsten arc) welding. Students will learn proper set up and operating procedures through classroom demonstrations. Special emphasis is placed on safety principles. Theory and operations of shielded metal arc welding equipment will also be covered. Emphasis is on safety, machine settings, and filler metals. Students will also develop a proficiency in theory and operation of shielded metal arc welding in flat welding position, and horizontal welding position. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MATT 2350L

MATT 2510
General Preventative/Predictive Maintenance
2

Introduces students to various types of principles and practices used within industry for predictive and preventative maintenance of equipment. Topics will include: safety, housekeeping, filter replacement, oil analysis, lubricating, vibration analysis, shaft alignment, balancing, motor current analysis, infrared and ultrasonic analysis, and troubleshooting. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

MATT 2710
Shop Floor Networking
1

Explores the various types of communication systems used in industrial systems for the transportation and exchange of data. Network topologies and specifications, LAN and field bus technologies, used in manufacturing are presented. The data exchange techniques and formats between typical industrial equipment for information and control will be described. Configuration requirements examples of the industrial devices are also presented to show the use in manufacturing applications. 30 hours of lab are required.

MATT 2990
Capstone Project
6

Assesses the participant's ability to demonstrate hands-on proficiency, using the training gained in this course of study, to safely implement a typical automation application, described in this document, that the Mechatronic Technician would expect to encounter in nearly any manufacturing facility. 320 hours of lab are required.

ME 2110
Materials Science
4

Introduces the principles of engineering materials. This course covers the correlation of the internal structure and service conditions with the mechanical, thermal, and electrical properties of metals, polymers, and ceramics. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 2460

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2110L

ME 2210
Statics
3

Introduces the basic principles of mechanics with engineering applications. This course includes the concepts of vectors; moments and couples; equilibrium of particles and rigid bodies; free body diagrams; analysis of trusses, frames, machines, and beams; centroids and moments of inertia. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510, SCI 2510

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2210L

ME 2250
Dynamics
3

Introduces students to the kinematics and kinetics of particles, systems of particles, and rigid bodies. This course includes energy and momentum principles. 45 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2250L

ME 2410
Introduction to 3D Modeling
3

Introduces students to 3D computer aided design modeling techniques using industry typical software. Builds on connection between 2D drawings/sketches and 3D solid modeling. Introduces concepts of projects, parts, libraries, catalogs, and other topics related to industry application of CAD programs.

ME 2450
Introduction to Computer Aided Engineering (CAE)
2

Introduces students to the application of computer technology to the engineering design process. Explores new design methodologies and techniques used throughout the design process from a product's conceptual design and simulation through manufacturing. Using 3D solid model software taught in class, students will learn the benefits of solid modeling as it relates to engineering design and the role it plays in the product development process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2450L

ME 2710
Pneumatics and Hydraulics
3

Covers the basic components and functions of hydraulic and pneumatic circuits and systems, leading up to the design, application and troubleshooting of both types of systems. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

ME 3210
Solid Mechanics
3

Introduces students to the mechanics of deformable solids. This course includes the concepts of stress and strain; ductile and brittle material behaviors; and stress and strain constitutive laws. Axial, torsional, and bending deformations; and shear and moment diagrams in beams are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 3220, ME 3250

ME 3220
Solid Mechanics and Vibrations Lab
1

Focuses on verification of basic mechanical properties of materials, beam deflections, stresses, strains, natural frequencies, and modes of vibrations through physical experiments using strain gauges, tensile testing machine, and finite element simulations with ANSYS software. 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 3210

ME 3250
Vibrations
3

Focuses on oscillatory motion including free vibration, harmonically excited vibration, transient vibration, two degree of freedom systems, properties of vibrating systems, and normal mode vibration of continuous systems.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, MTH 3550

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 3210, ME 3220

ME 3270
Mechanical Design
4

Introduces students to machine design including materials and process considerations. Topics include load determination; stress, strain, and deflection; static, fatigue, and surface failure theories. A design project is required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, ME 3210

ME 3310
Thermodynamics
3

Covers classical thermodynamics. This course includes the properties of a pure substance; work, heat, energy, enthalpy, and entropy; first and second laws of thermodynamics; and power and refrigeration systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 3510, SCI 2510

ME 3410
Fluid Mechanics
3

Introduces students to the mechanics of fluids. This course includes fluid properties, kinematics, fluid statics, Bernoulli equation, control-volume and differential forms of the fundamental laws, dimensional analysis, similitude, and fluid/flow phenomena.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 2250, MTH 3550

ME 4310
Heat Transfer
3

Covers the mechanisms of heat transfer including conduction, convection, and radiation. This course also includes the design, analysis, and selection of heat exchangers.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 4350

ME 4350
Thermal Systems Lab
1

Explores thermal and fluid systems experiments, designs and applications. Design topics may include heat and mass transfer, fluid flow, thermodynamic systems and heat exchangers. 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 4310

ME 4410
Advanced Fluid Mechanics
3

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3410

ME 4610
Dynamic Systems and Control
3

Introduces mathematical modeling of mechanical, fluid, and electrical systems in graphical and state equation form. This course includes time and frequency response of linear systems and linear feedback control.

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110, ME 3250, MTH 3550 or EE 2120, MTH 3550

ME 4710
Introduction to Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
3

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3210, MTH 3550

ME 4730
Intermediate Finite Element Analysis (FEA)
3

Prerequisite(s):
ME 4710

ME 4750
Kinematics
3

ME 4770
Noise, Vibration, and Harshness
3

Prerequisite(s):
ME 3250

Concurrent requisite(s):
ME 2250

ME 4790
Biomechanics and Biomaterials
3

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 2150 or SCI 2510

ME 4810
Ergonomics for Engineers
3

Prerequisite(s):
EGR 1050, ME 2210

ME 4830
Alternative Energies
3

ME 4850
Computer Aided Engineering (CAE) with Solidworks
3

ME 4870
Mechatronics
3

Prerequisite(s):
EE 2110, EE 3610 or EE 2110, ME 4610

ME 4950
Engineering Topics
3

MGT 1010
Introduction to Business
3

Provides a basic understanding of many aspects of business through an overview of the changing business environment, the roles of small businesses, entrepreneurs, and the importance of customer relations, management, and marketing. Financial management, accounting and banking will also be discussed.

MGT 1110
Professional Management Behavior
3

Examines the role that professional management behavior plays in the success of any organization. Emphasis is on the importance of customer service, ethical behavior, and effective communication, building relationships and recognizing diversity. Students will participate in role plays, team projects, networking assignments, and case studies.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010

MGT 2110
Staffing and Performance Management
3

Explores a variety of human resources management issues. Students are introduced to the tactical and strategic role of the human resource function within an organization. Examines coaching, employee performance measurements, team-based/team development, accountability, employment procedures, and discipline.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010

MGT 2210
Management Seminar
3

Discusses a variety of significant issues related to business and organizational leadership in today's dynamic, customer-driven, global economy. This course focuses on the challenges of change and management's response to change, the diversity of management methods, and managing strategies for the future. As a seminar, this course uses peer teaching and learning approaches, involves group learning experiences in a team environment, requires practical application of concepts, and includes research and case studies. This course culminates the associate's degree of management.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010

MGT 3010
Principles of Management
3

Provides an understanding of leadership styles, the managerial process, organizational resources and how to use them, various motivation/behavior theories, conflict management, and implementing and supporting changes. Students will compare different leadership styles and apply them in case scenarios, role plays and other group/team activities involving topics such as: change, employee behavior, conflict, ethics, decision making and managing resources.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010

MGT 3110
Organizational Change
3

Examines the effects of environmental change on organizations and organizational systems. Emphasis is placed on sustaining change by building organizational capability involving human resources and organizational practices which have the potential to sustain the organization's ability to continually adapt in a dynamic environment. Topics include organizational behavior, groups and interpersonal influence, strategic interventions, approaches to systems, system analysis and design, implementation techniques, monitoring, complementary human assets, contextual relations, and linkages. Specific examples are drawn from industry experience and models.

MGT 3210
Management Information Systems
3

Explores the role of information systems in organizations. This course covers the major types of information systems and the impact that these systems have on organizations, including how information systems improve decision making and support the business strategy. Information system development and planning are covered, as well as information security and the challenges of future technology changes.

MGT 3310
Applied Leadership
3

Examines a variety of leadership and management styles and their application. Emphasis is on problem-solving, collaboration, managing resources, ethical behavior, using appropriate leadership style, team-building, and characteristics of effective leadership.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2210

MGT 3410
Globalization and Diversity
3

Examines factors that shape cultural diversity on a global basis. It develops the ability to analyze situations and develop appropriate management techniques to deal with a variety of business situations. It examines cultures and business practices among key global marketplaces.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 2210

MGT 3510
Applied Business Analytics
3

Applies mathematical and quantitative methods to managerial decision-making. Students will apply analytics in various decision making situations (certainty, risk and uncertainty) involved with operations, planning/control projects and quality management initiatives.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 2110

MGT 4220
Operations Management
3

Introduces students to a broad scope and major strategic, tactical, and operational decisions of operations management, as well as important interactions with other functional areas. Emphasis is on a conceptual understanding of the operations function and includes the following topics: product/process selection and design, facility location and layout, capacity, material management, inventory planning and control, quality management, and outsourcing.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 3010, MTH 1050 or MGT 3010, MTH 1110

MGT 4310
Strategic Management
3

Addresses the strategic function of an enterprise. By integrating functional courses into a balanced overall view, this course focuses upon the interaction and interrelationships of an organization with its environment. This is the capstone course in the Bachelor of Business Administration in Management program.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 3010, MGT 3210

Corequisite(s):
MGT 4220

MIS 5110
Management Information Systems
3

Provides an overview for students of Information System, and prepares them to be successful in their professional roles as well as for future academic studies in the field. An emphasis is placed on how management can use information and information technology to gain competitive advantage, increase productivity, and make better and timelier decisions particularly when formulating business strategy and policy.

Prerequisite(s):
CGS 5010

MIS 5210
Information Systems Project Management
3

Guides an IS project manager through the what, when, and how of the work necessary to take a project from its fledgling idea to successful deployment in an efficient and effective manner. This course will provide the tools, skills and knowledge for successful planning, organization, and implementation of information systems and emphasizes the use of real-world examples and applications. Common mistakes and pitfalls in project management when used in designing information systems will be discussed. Topics covered include project scoping, estimating, budgeting, scheduling, tracking and controlling.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6780 or CGS 5010

MIS 5260
Business Intelligence
3

Introduces business intelligence (BI) for supporting strategic planning and decision making in organizations. It helps students to get familiar with the concepts and methodologies of BI. It covers topics such as data warehousing, data mining, text mining, and performance dashboard design and usage.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 5110

MIS 5310
Database Design and Management
3

Prepares students to be able to manage, within organizational settings, the major concepts and frame work, design and implementation of databases. It examines the theories, concepts, and application issues associated with the design and implementation of database management systems. Topics include requirements analysis, user specifications, design strategies, implementation, testing, growth, maturity, and obsolescence. Other topics include relational and distributed databases, business implications of database design, data integrity, and security.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 5110

MIS 6010
Information Security
3

Focuses on tools necessary for quantifying risk as well as costs and benefits of mitigation methods and technologies. Topics covered include software, access control systems and methodology, business continuity and disaster recovery planning, legal issues in information system security, ethics, computer operations security, physical security and security architecture. The course seeks to provide a balance between the managerial role and the technical role.

Prerequisite(s):
CGS 5010

MIS 6110
System Analysis and Design
3

Helps students understand what constitutes a system, how to describe and analyze a system through requirement elicitation, and how to concretely analyze and design a system.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 5110

MIS 6210
Systems Architectures
3

Addresses the relationships and tradeoffs associated with computer hardware and software. Emphasis will be placed on system architecture including data and file structures, data storage, data communications, systems analysis and design, the operator-machine interface, input/output devices and operating systems. Other topics include system architectures for single-user, centralized, and networked computing systems and single-user and multi-user operating systems. Primarily, however, this course will focus on software system architectures.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 5210, MIS 5310, MIS 6110

MIS 6240
Data Warehousing
3

Addresses design issues related to data warehousing and techniques for using data warehouses for business intelligence. In this course, a variety of tools will be used to demonstrate design, implementation, and utilization (e.g., mining) of data warehouses. Students will learn how data warehouses are used to help managers successfully gather, analyze, understand and act on information that has been stored in data warehouses, and will gain hands-on experience in creating and querying a data warehouse.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 5310

MIS 6710
Information Systems Integration Project I
3

Helps students integrate the knowledge and skills acquired during class work in the MSIS program. MIS6710 is the first of two capstone courses (the other being MIS6720). For most students, these courses will be undertaken with industry sponsorship, often their own employers, which will involve the development of an information systems project of appropriate scope. MIS6710 focuses on project initiation, system analysis, and system design.

Prerequisite(s):
Business Intelligence and Information Systems majors: MIS 5210 and MIS 6110.
Cyber Security Risk Management major: MIS 5210

Concurrent requisite(s):
Corequisite(s): Business Intelligence major: BUS 6150, BUS 6300, BUS 6400, BUS 6780, MIS 5260, MIS 5310. Information Systems major: BUS 6150, BUS 6300, BUS 6400, BUS 6780, MIS 5310. Cyber Security Risk Management major: BUS 6210, BUS 6230, BUS 6150, BUS 6300, BUS 6400, BUS 6780.

MIS 6720
Information Systems Integration Project II
3

Focuses on finishing the design, implementation, and documentation of their system designed in MIS6710, followed by a presentation to their industry sponsor and the instructor. The project is considered to be successfully completed when the system meets the requirements as specified AND the project sponsor is satisfied with the results. MIS6720 can be repeated up to 3 times until project completion.

Prerequisite(s):
MIS 6710

MKT 1110
Principles of Marketing
3

Examines the essentials of an introductory course than can be either a survey course or a prerequisite to more advanced marketing studies. Study includes product identification, positioning and pricing strategies, consumer need identification and making the connection between consumer needs and product advertising, basic distribution strategies, and some of the decision-making tools at the disposal of the marketing manager. This course is recommended as a first course for marketing majors.

MKT 3110
Consumer Behavior
3

Studies consumer functions such as decision-making, attitude formation and change, cognition, perception, and learning. The marketing concepts of product positioning, segmentation, brand loyalty, shopping preference and diffusion of innovations are considered in context with the environmental, ethical, multicultural and social influences on an increasingly diverse American consumer.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 1110

MKT 3410
Digital Marketing I
3

Explores how digital advertising and social media fit into the marketing process. Introduces the concept of building brand communities by interactive, two-way communication through the objectives of theory, tactics, media, and planning. Topics include strategic communication planning, digital media, social media, customer relationship management, ethics, and digital marketing careers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MGT 1010, MKT 1110

MKT 3420
Digital Marketing II
3

Continues the exploration of how digital advertising and social media fit into the marketing process. Emphasis will be on social networking, crowd-sourcing, mobile computing, location marketing, and development of a digital marketing plan using social media integrated with the more traditional marketing tools to fulfill the organization's objectives of satisfying the customer. Students will develop a digital marketing campaign in the course.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 3410

MKT 3510
Marketing Analytics
3

Continues the exploration of data analysis related to marketing. Students will examine a systematic and objective approach to marketing research focusing on gathering and analyzing information to make better marketing decisions. Various research methodologies are reviewed and students will work on developing data gathering instruments, participate in collecting the data, analyzing the data and producing effective reports which can be used in decision making.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 2110, MKT 1110

MKT 4010
Marketing Research
3

Explores the concept that in order to satisfy a need and create customer satisfaction, a business must know about its customers. Students will examine a systematic and objective approach to marketing research focusing on gathering and analyzing information to make better marketing decisions. Research methods will focus on planning, problem solving, and controlling. Methodologies covered include correlation, experimentation, observation, survey, and case study research.

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 2110, MKT 1110

Corequisite(s):
MKT 3510

MKT 4110
International Marketing
3

Analyzes world markets, their respective consumers and environments, and the marketing management required to meet the demands of true global markets. Cultural environments, opportunity assessment, and global marketing strategies are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 1110

MKT 4310
Marketing Strategy and Design
3

Gives students the opportunity to participate in a course that integrates previous marketing content knowledge in a problem-based learning environment. Students will design an integrated marketing campaign including a detailed marketing plan which incorporates a marketing code of ethics, and effective communication plan for the presentation of this integrated marketing campaign to both internal and external stakeholders. This is the capstone course of the Bachelor in Business Administration in Marketing program.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 3110, MKT 3420, MKT 3510

MKT 4410
Sales Strategy
3

Familiarizes students with the steps of the selling process from beginning to end, with a focus on organization and a systematic approach. Topics include communication, the strategic selling process, sales careers, understanding your customer, distribution channels, and using technology.

Prerequisite(s):
MKT 3110, MKT 3420, MKT 3510

Corequisite(s):
MKT 4310

MLT 1010
Introduction to Medical Laboratory Technician
3

Introduces clinical laboratory procedures, instruments, and calculations used by laboratory personnel. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 1010L

MLT 2010
Hematology and Coagulation
5

Introduces basic theories and techniques in the study of blood and their application in a clinical laboratory. The laboratory component will emphasize differentials and other blood tests. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 2010L

MLT 2210
Immunology
2

Provides a solid understanding of the basic concepts of immunology including procedural theories and disease manifestations. Must complete with a B- or better.

MLT 2310
Laboratory Chemistry
3

Examines the clinical significance and methods of analysis for a variety of analytes found in components of the blood and other body fluids. Laboratory includes qualitative and quantitative measurements of several analytes. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

MLT 2410
Medical Microbiology
5

Studies medically significant bacteria. Methods of isolation, identification, and classification of various microorganisms found in clinical specimens. Virology and arasitology introduces students to medically significant viruses, parasites, and fungi. Emphasis will be on media selection and staining of organisms for identification purposes. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 2410L

MLT 2510
Immunohematology
4

Provides a guide to blood transfusion practices and blood banking, which includes antigen-antibody reactions, compatibility testing and blood group typing. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 2510L

MLT 2610
Urinalysis
2

Introduces basic theories and techniques in urinalysis, body fluids and clinical microscopy. Renal function and body fluid tests are explored and results are correlated to their clinical significance. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 2610L

MLT 2710
Clinical Experience
6

Provides a clinical laboratory experience in a qualified health facility and an opportunity for students to observe procedures and demonstrate competency in selected areas. A rotation through the clinical laboratory areas of hematology, coagulation, urinalysis, microbiology, chemistry, immunohematology, and serology is started. 30 hours of lab and 300 hours of clinical experiences are required. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MLT 2710L

MLT 2910
MLT Capstone Review
3

Provides a comprehensive review of previous coursework, professional accountability, preparation for the National Registry Exam, and job seeking skills. This is the capstone course. Must complete with a B- or better.

MNP 2010
Microsoft Windows Configuration
3

Provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to install, deploy, and upgrade to Microsoft Windows, including ensuring hardware and software compatibility. Additionally, this course covers the skills necessary to configure pre-installation and post-installation system settings, Windows security features, network connectivity applications included with Windows, and mobile computing. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examinations.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

MNP 2110
Microsoft Client
3

Provides students with the skills and knowledge necessary to install, deploy, and upgrade to Microsoft Windows 8, including ensuring hardware and software compatibility. Additionally, this course covers the skills necessary to configure pre-installation and post-installation system settings, Windows security features, network connectivity applications included with Windows 8, and mobile computing. This course also addresses the initial implementation and configuration of core services including Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), networking services, and Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012 configuration. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-687 and 70-410: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 2110L

MNP 2150
Microsoft Server
3

Addresses the initial implementation and configuration of core services including Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), networking services, and Microsoft Server configuration. This is a Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for a Microsoft Certification examination. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

MNP 2210
Server Administration I (Group D)
3

Addresses the initial implementation and configuration of core services including Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS), networking services, and Microsoft Hyper-V Server 2012 configuration. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-410: Installing and Configuring Windows Server 2012. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

MNP 2220
Server Administration II (Group D)
3

Focuses on the administration tasks necessary to maintain a Windows Server 2012 infrastructure such as implementing server images, user and group management with Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) and group policy, remote access and network policies, data security, monitoring and update management. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-411: Administering Windows Server 2012.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 2220L

MNP 3110
Advanced Server Administration I
3

Description not yet available.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 3110

MNP 3120
Advanced Server Administration II
3

Description not yet available.

Prerequisite(s):
MNP 3110

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 3120

MNP 4310
Advanced Server Administration III
3

Presents advanced topics to prepare aspiring IT professionals for planning, designing, and deploying a physical and a logical Windows Server 2012 enterprise Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) infrastructure including the network services necessary. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-413: Designing and Implementing a Server Infrastructure. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 4310

MNP 4320
Advanced Server Administration IV
3

Continues preparation for planning, designing and deploying a physical and logical Windows Server 2012 enterprise and Active Directory Domain Services (AD DS) infrastructures including the network services, virtualization, server monitoring, failover clustering, continuity strategies, public key infrastructure, and information rights management infrastructure. This Microsoft Official Academic Course helps to prepare the student for the Microsoft Certification examination, 70-414: Implementing an Advanced Server Infrastructure. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MNP 4320

MRS 1210
Introduction to Medical Reimbursement
3

Defines the role of the medical insurance specialist. Students will be introduced to reimbursement terminology, coding systems, major insurance programs, governmental agencies, and the role of the various members of the health care team as related to medical reimbursement. Students will study current events related to medical reimbursement. Must complete this course with a C or better.

MRS 1310
ICD/CPT/HCPCS Coding
8

Emphasizes the organization of diagnosis codes and the basic ICD-10-CM coding rules. Written descriptions of diseases, disorders, and injuries are translated into ICD-10 codes to their highest level of specificity and to match the procedure/service performed. Focuses on the organization of the procedural coding system developed throughout the United States and how they are used in Michigan. This course enables students to translate written descriptions of procedures/services performed to their highest level of specificity. Students will learn to use the ICD, CPC and HCPCS manuals for proper code selection as well as their rules and regulations. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, MRS 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1330, MRS 1350

MRS 1330
Reimbursement Ethics and Compliance
2

Emphasizes knowledge of legal, regulatory and ethical issues associated with the medical insurance profession. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, MRS 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1310, MRS 1350

MRS 1350
Revenue Cycle Management
4

Develops knowledge of medical office business operations to include all aspects of the revenue cycle process. Topics in this class include fee schedules, insurance verification, HIPAA, ethics, professionalism, clinician credentialing, patient scheduling, proficiency in practice management software, claim transaction capture and processing, accounts receivable reconciliation, and introduction to medical office management. Students’ will acquire knowledge in claims processing for the various payer groups through case studies, referral forms, and status inquiry. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, MRS 1210

Corequisite(s):
MRS 1330

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1310, MRS 1330

MRS 1410
Facility Billing
3

Focuses on the student's knowledge related to facility (hospital insurance) billing and provides students with expertise from the UB04 Hospital Billing Manual. Students will learn Michigan Insurance billing for Medicare, Medicaid, and Blue Cross related to the UB04 form using ICD-10-PCS diagnosis codes, CPT-4 procedure codes, Revenue codes, Conditions codes, et al, for inpatient and outpatient settings. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1450, MRS 1590

MRS 1450
Advanced Reimbursement Concepts
3

Demonstrate proficiency in data abstraction from medical records to support billing codes for CPT, ICD, and HCPCS. Must complete this course with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1410, MRS 1590

MRS 1590
Certification Review and Externship
5

Gives a comprehensive review of medical reimbursement focused on preparing students to take either or both of the medical insurance certification exams, Certified Medical Reimbursement Specialist (CMRS) and Certified Professional Coder (CPC). The course will emphasize test-taking strategies for each exam. 30 hours of lecture. Provides 160 hours of supervised work experience. This work experience will provide students with meaningful hands-on experience to reinforce their classroom instruction. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
MRS 1210, MRS 1310, MRS 1330, MRS 1350

Concurrent requisite(s):
MRS 1410, MRS 1450

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1310
Pre-Calculus
5

Examines functions, their inverses, graphs, and properties. Students solve equations and real-world problems involving polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics also addressed are: conic sections, complex numbers, vectors, sequences and series. Limits are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110 OR MTH 1210

MTH 1410
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
3

Focuses on the applications of discrete mathematics in computer science. This course includes set theory, propositional logic, relations, Boolean algebra, and minimization of equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310 or MTH 1210

MTH 1510
Calculus I
4

Examines the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems. Antiderivatives, and the process of integration are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 or MTH 1310

MTH 2710
Probability and Statistics for Educators
3

Introduces students to statistical methods common to educators. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, present, summarize, and interpret data using graphical and numerical methods; calculate probability, including binomial probability, and apply probability distributions; and utilize linear regression analysis to describe relationships in bivariate data. (Online only)

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120 or MTH 1310

MTH 3110
Algebraic Thinking and Proportional Reasoning
3

Builds algebraic thinking through examination of patterns and relationships, logic, and functions as well as developing appropriate symbolic forms to represent and analyze mathematical situations and structures. Multiple representations of situations are used and the interrelationships of these representations are stressed. Attention is given to developing proportional reasoning by investigating number theory, ratio and proportion, and decimals and percents as extensions of the whole number system.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2110

MTH 3610
College Geometry
3

Familiarizes students with Euclidean geometry through the analysis of two and three dimensional objects. Transformations and coordinate and non-Euclidean geometries are introduced. Geometric proofs are utilized. Application of geometric concepts to real-world situations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

MTH 4110
Reasoning and Proof for Elementary Educators
3

Introduces systematic thinking within an axiomatic system through formation and investigation of conjectures and development of formal proofs; precursors to higher mathematics. Develops and evaluates mathematical proofs, specifically direct and indirect proofs and proofs by mathematical induction.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310, MTH 1410 and MTH 3110

MTH 1050
Quantitative Reasoning I
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1060
Quantitative Reasoning II
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, regression, voting methods, and graph theory. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. The combination of MTH 1050 and MTH 1060 satisfy the Quantitative Reasoning Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

MTH 1110
College Algebra I
3

Introduces elements of algebra including graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, rational equations, and functions. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. The combination of MTH 1110 and MTH 1120 satisfy the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

MTH 1210
Trigonometry
3

Analyzes trigonometric functions, their properties, solution of right and oblique triangles, radian measure, graphs, vectors, trigonometric equations, and applications.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120

MTH 1310
Pre-Calculus
5

Examines functions, their inverses, graphs, and properties. Students solve equations and real-world problems involving polynomial, rational, exponential, logarithmic, and trigonometric functions. Topics also addressed are: conic sections, complex numbers, vectors, sequences and series. Limits are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110 or MTH 1210

MTH 1410
Introduction to Discrete Mathematics
3

Focuses on the applications of discrete mathematics in computer science. This course includes set theory, propositional logic, relations, Boolean algebra, and minimization of equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310 or MTH 1210

MTH 1510
Calculus I
4

Examines the topics of functions, limits, continuity, the process of taking derivatives, and the application of derivatives such as related rates, curve sketching, and optimization problems. Antiderivatives, and the process of integration are introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 or MTH 1310

MTH 2510
Calculus II
4

Explores integration of functions, ordinary differential equations, series and sequences, and their application. Techniques of integration, improper integrals, convergence and divergence of various types of series and sequences, and applications related to area, volume, conic sections, parametric equations, and polar equations are emphasized.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

MTH 2710
Probability and Statistics for Educators
3

Introduces students to statistical methods common to educators. Students will learn how to collect, analyze, present, summarize, and interpret data using graphical and numerical methods; calculate probability, including binomial probability, and apply probability distributions; and utilize linear regression analysis to describe relationships in bivariate data. (Online only)

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1120 or MTH 1310

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. The combination of MTH 1050 Quantitative Reasoning I or MTH 1110 College Algebra I with MTH 2750 Statistical Methods satisfies the Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 or MTH 1110

MTH 3110
Algebraic Thinking and Proportional Reasoning
3

Builds algebraic thinking through examination of patterns and relationships, logic, and functions as well as developing appropriate symbolic forms to represent and analyze mathematical situations and structures. Multiple representations of situations are used and the interrelationships of these representations are stressed. Attention is given to developing proportional reasoning by investigating number theory, ratio and proportion, and decimals and percents as extensions of the whole number system.

Prerequisite(s):
EDU 2110

MTH 3510
Multivariable Calculus
4

Examines functions of several variables, vector calculus, multiple integrals, and partial differentiation.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

MTH 3550
Differential Equations and Linear Algebra
4

Examines algebra of matrices, vectors in space, vector spaces and subspaces, eigenvalues, linear transformations, and the applications of matrix methods to find solutions to systems of linear equations and linear programming problems. Also examines the principles and methods for solving and applying first, second, and higher order differential equations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510

MTH 3610
College Geometry
3

Familiarizes students with Euclidean geometry through the analysis of two and three dimensional objects. Transformations and coordinate and non-Euclidean geometries are introduced. Geometric proofs are utilized. Application of geometric concepts to real-world situations.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310

MTH 4110
Reasoning and Proof for Elementary Educators
3

Introduces systematic thinking within an axiomatic system through formation and investigation of conjectures and development of formal proofs; precursors to higher mathematics. Develops and evaluates mathematical proofs, specifically direct and indirect proofs and proofs by mathematical induction.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310, MTH 1410, MTH 3110

MTH 4150
Modern Algebra
3

Explores the ideas, methods, applications, and questions of modern algebra. Students study the basic properties and theorems related to groups, rings, integral domains, and fields; the familiar number systems serve as models for the abstract systems. This course provides experience in abstract reasoning, making and testing conjectures, and proving theorems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1410, MTH 3550

MTH 4510
Introduction to Real Analysis
3

Introduces the fundamental mathematical theory underlying calculus; specifically convergence of sequences and series, limits, continuity, differentiation, and integration. Application of logic and construction of mathematical proofs are covered.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1410, MTH 3510

MTH 4910
Senior Seminar: Mathematics
3

Familiarizes students with the professional community of mathematics educators, state and national curricula, assessment standards in mathematics, and the use of electronic technologies to investigate and solve real-world problems. This capstone course for mathematics majors and minors explores the historical development of mathematics. Students are required to demonstrate subject matter knowledge and critical thinking in mathematics.

NET 1010
Networking Essentials
3

Introduces students to the field of computing. Focuses on the basic issues related to data communications and networking technologies. Topics include the OSI model, network topologies, protocols, and the fundamentals of internetworking. TCP/IP addressing is also covered. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
CIS 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
NET 1010L

NET 2110
Wireless Networking
3

Explores the planning, designing, installing and configuring of wireless LANs. Offers in-depth coverage of wireless networks with extensive coverage of IEEE 802.11 b/a/g/pre-n implementation, design, managing, security, and troubleshooting. Material is reinforced with hands-on projects. This course prepares students for the Certified Wireless Network Administrator (CWNA) certification.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

NET 2210
Routers and Routing
3

Provides an introduction to the concepts of routers, the OSI reference model, IP addressing, subnetting, data link and network addresses, and concepts of data encapsulation. Includes hands-on exercises. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
NET 2210L

NET 2250
Advanced Routers and Routing (Group D)
3

Examines router elements, RIP and IGRP routing protocols, router operating system software, configuration and installation, and LAN segmentation using bridges, routers, and switches. Covers the operation of the Spanning Tree protocol. Focus is on Cisco technology. Includes hands-on exercises.

Prerequisite(s):
NET 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
NET 2250L

NET 2310
Virtual Environment Install Configure and Manage
3

Explores the installation, configuration and management of VMware vSphere. The course is based on ESXi and vCenter Server and gives students practical lab experience in installing vSphere components; configuring and managing ESXi networking and storage using vCenter Server; deploying, managing and migrating virtual machines; monitoring ESXi resources; and using vCenter to manage high availability and data protection of virtual systems. Completion of this course satisfies the prerequisite for taking the VMware Certified Professional 5 certification examination. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
NET 2310L

NPMG 3010
Grant Writing
3

NPMG 3310
Fund Development
3

Emphasizes the history and trends of philanthropy and the laws that impact fund development. Policies for fund development will be constructed and the role of the Board of Directors vs. staff will be outlined. The opportunity for the use of technology used in the fund development will be discussed along with available resources. As operational tasks in fund development are carried out, ethical and professional standards will be discussed including transparency. The challenges to fund development will be addressed including the results vs. the effort in fund raising, strategies, employee burn out, the economy, skilled staff, etc.

NUR 2110
Fundamentals of Nursing for the ADN
7

Provides nursing students with the basic fundamental knowledge and skills necessary in the delivery of care to the adult patient with a focus on the nursing process. Critical thinking skills and the process of clinical reasoning will be stressed. A Caring philosophy as applied to the holistic care of the adult patient will permeate this course. Students are provided with practical experience in a laboratory setting that stresses the provision of basic nursing and health assessment skills necessary to give safe and competent patient-centered care through supervised practice of skills, assessment, and discussion of application to patient care situations. 45 hours of theory, 60 hours of lab and 90 hours of clinical experience are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance into the nursing program

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2110CL, NUR 2110L

NUR 2150
Fundamentals of Nursing for the BSN
7

Provides nursing students with the basic fundamental knowledge and skills necessary in the delivery of care to the adult patient with a focus on the nursing process, safety, and quality. Critical thinking skills and the process of clinical reasoning will be stressed. A Caring philosophy as applied to the holistic care of the adult patient will permeate this course. Students are provided with practical experience in a laboratory setting that stresses the provision of basic nursing and health assessment skills necessary to give safe and quality patient-centered care. Student will apply these concepts in the provision of patient care in the clinical setting. 45 hours of theory, 60 hours of lab and 90 hours of clinical experience is required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2150CL, NUR 2150L

NUR 2210
Health Assessment for the ADN
2

Focuses on a holistic approach to the physical examination and health assessment, an essential element of the nursing process. This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate elementary skills to accomplish the health history and physical examination of the adult client. Threads of caring for the biopsychosocial and spiritual well-being of the client will be emphasized in this learning experience. This course requires 30 theory hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

NUR 2250
Health Assessment for the BSN
3

This course will enable students to develop and demonstrate essential knowledge and skills to examine the health of the adult client, including a health history and physical examination. Threads of caring for the biopsychosocial and spiritual well-being of the client will be explored. Community health will be introduced. Health promotion, holistic concepts, and continuum of health and wellness will be emphasized. Students will integrate pre-requisite course knowledge as it applies to health assessment. 45 hours of theory are required. Must complete with a B- or better. This course requires 45 theory hours

NUR 2310
Nursing Pharmacology Overview for the ADN
2

Provides a theoretical foundation for the fundamental principles and concepts of pharmacotherapeutics, with a focus on classification, usage, dosage, calculation, and delivery methods. This course requires 30 theory hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2210

NUR 2350
Pharmacology and Medication Administration for the BSN
3

Provides a theoretical foundation for the fundamental principles and concepts of pharmacotherapeutics, with a focus on classification, usage, dosage, and delivery methods. Provides nursing students with the knowledge, skills, and attitudes (KSAs) necessary to safely administer medications. Included are essentials of safe medication administration such as systems of measurement, abbreviations, symbols, and dosage calculations. Prevention of medical errors is an essential component of this course. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2150, NUR 2250

NUR 2410
Mental Health Nursing for the ADN
3

Presents the essential concepts of mental health and mental illness within the context of relationship centered care. Emphasis will be on enhancing mental wellness of individuals, families, or groups through a transpersonal caring model as students apply the nursing process. Theoretical content will focus on therapeutic communication, exploration of therapeutic use of self, major psychiatric disorders, stress and crisis, legal and ethical aspects of practice, and culturally competent care. Students will have opportunities to practice nursing assessment and interventions based on the Standards of Psychiatric/Mental Health Clinical Nursing in a variety of clinical settings. This course runs the second 6 weeks of the semester. This course requires 30 theory and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2410CL

NUR 2510
Medical Surgical Nursing I for the ADN
10

Addresses the theoretical application of the nursing process to concepts of patient-centered care. Evidence-based practice, collaborative care, cultural and global awareness, and teamwork/collaboration are explored further. Concepts included in this course are: health promotion and maintenance, principles of pharmacology, correlation of medications to disease processes, nutrition, communication, pain, infection control, acute and chronic health conditions, death and dying, and hospice care. Case studies and simulation scenarios are utilized to promote learning. Administration of medication skills will be practiced in a lab setting. Quality and safety are underscored in the provision of care. Students, in the acute care clinical setting, under the supervision of a clinical instructor will practice nursing assessment and nursing management skills in the care of the adult client with altered health conditions. This course requires 90 theory hours, 30 lab hours, and 135 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2110, NUR 2210, NUR 2310, NUR 2410

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2510CL, NUR 2510L

NUR 2520
Medical/Surgical Nursing II for the ADN
3

Focuses on comprehensive knowledge and skills gained throughout the nursing program will be applied to medical-surgical, critical care, emergency, and perioperative phases as they occur across the lifespan. Understanding of the role of the professional nurse expands to include multidisciplinary teamwork and collaboration. This course runs the first 6 weeks of the semester and requires 45 hours of theory. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2510, NUR 3610, HSC 2210

NUR 2550
Medical/Surgical Nursing I for the BSN
7

Addresses the application of patient-centered care to the nursing process in the care of the medical surgical patient. Evidence-based practice, collaborative care, and cultural and global awareness are explored further. Concepts included in this course are: health promotion and maintenance, correlation of medications to disease processes, nutrition, communication, pain, infection control, and selected adult health conditions. Allows students to practice application of nursing process concepts of care in a supervised clinical setting. Case studies and simulation scenarios are utilized to promote learning. Administration of medication skills will be practiced in a lab setting. Quality and safety are underscored in the provision of care. This course requires 60 hours of theory, 30 hours of lab and 90 hours of clinical experience is required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2150, NUR 2250

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2550CL, NUR 2550L

NUR 2610
Child and Family Nursing for the ADN
3

Focuses on issues of children and their families with an emphasis on the application of the nursing process. Personal values, attitudes, and feelings about children and their families will be explored. Common disorders of body systems and the use of pharmacological agents in children are explored. Students will have the opportunity apply knowledge and skills to the care of children and families, through application of the nursing process to this patient population in a variety of settings. A multidisciplinary team approach and effective communication is emphasized. This course requires 30 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2110, NUR 2210, NUR 2310, NUR 2410

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2610CL

NUR 2710
Maternal Child Nursing for the ADN
3

Introduces students to the developing family during the childbearing time as a focus for nursing. The emphasis is placed on the care of the mother as well as the care of the fetus and newborn. The nursing process is utilized in assessment of all elements and phases of pregnancy, planning, providing and evaluating nursing interventions that promote optimal wellness. The effects of culture, ethnic, and economic influences as well as the interaction with the extended family and/or community will be discussed. In addition, the complications of pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes that threaten the childbearing family will be examined from both physiologic and psychosocial aspects. Assists students in applying theory and developing competence in utilizing the nursing process to provide care for families in the childbearing cycle. The effects of cultural, ethnic, spiritual, and psychosocial factors will be emphasized. This course runs the first 6 weeks of the semester and requires 30 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2510, NUR 3610, HSC 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2710CL

NUR 2910
Nursing Leadership Seminar for the ADN
6

Prepares students to make the transition from student to entry-level practitioner. Explores liability and malpractice issues related to nursing as well as the legal basis for the practice of nursing in Michigan. The social context of nursing is emphasized. An overview of nursing in community settings is provided. Personal qualities of leadership are emphasized. NCLEX review will be conducted. Provides nursing students with the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. Under the direction and supervision of course faculty and individual clinical preceptors, students begin the transition to independent practitioner. Emphasis is placed on self-directed learning and evaluation in selected clinical areas. This course runs the second 6 weeks of the semester. 30 hours of theory and 180 hours of clinical experience are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2710, NUR 2520

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 2910CL

NUR 3050
Evidence Based Practice for the BSN
3

Explores various nursing theorists and provides an overview of evidence-based practice with an emphasis on improved quality of care. Examines the role of research in the application of the nursing process and its contribution to the development of nursing as a science. The student will be challenged to critically evaluate research and how it applies to the nursing profession and explore ethical issues inherent in the research process. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2750, NUR 2250, NUR 2350

NUR 3150
Community Nursing for the BSN
4

Examines the core functions and current organization of community health nursing as part of the larger healthcare system. Concentration is placed on achievement of optimal health outcomes for target populations and selected vulnerable subgroups within the community. The role of nursing will be examined in relation to public policy and emergency response and management. The clinical experience focuses on the application of community health and nursing principles in the care of individuals, families, and selected vulnerable subgroups within a variety of community health settings. Nurses serve as advocates, caregivers, leaders, and teachers at they apply to nursing process to communities with a focus on epidemiology, environmental health, and emergency response and management. This course requires 45 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2250, NUR 2350, NUR 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 3150CL

NUR 3210
Fundamentals of Professional Nursing Practice
3

Focuses on the registered nurses role transition to a professional baccalaureate nurse with emphasis on leadership, management, and issues influencing nursing education and practice. Students will explore the history of nursing, and how society views the nursing profession including contemporary issues that affect the profession of nursing. Students will integrate prior learning experience and skills with the theory and practice focus of baccalaureate education. Must complete with a B- or better.

NUR 3250
Nursing Assessment for the Registered Nurse
3

Builds on the registered nurses knowledge and skills in health assessment. Emphasis is placed on review of body systems, physical examination techniques, and documentation of findings. Students are also expected to identify and apply pathophysiological principles to selected health issues across the lifespan. Must complete with a B- or better.

NUR 3310
Nursing Theory and Research
3

Explores various nursing theorists and provides an overview of evidence-based practice with an emphasis on improved quality of care. Examines the role of research in the application of the nursing process and its contribution to the development of nursing as a science. Students will be challenged to critically evaluate research and how it applies to the nursing profession and explore ethical issues inherent in the research process. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2750

NUR 3350
Health Promotion and Vulnerable Populations
3

Focuses on the role of the experienced professional nurse in promoting optimal health, with special emphasis on the rehabilitative populations. Risk factors for illness and injury will be explored and strategies for treatment, health promotion through physical, psychological and spiritual intervention, will be addressed. Must complete with a B- or better.

NUR 3450
Mental Health Nursing for the BSN
4

Presents the essential concepts of mental health and mental illness within the context of patient-centered care. Emphasis will be on enhancing mental wellness of individuals, families, or groups through a transpersonal caring model as students apply the nursing process. Theoretical content will focus on therapeutic communication, exploration of therapeutic use of self, major psychiatric disorders, stress and crisis, legal and ethical aspects of practice, and culturally competent care. Students will have opportunities to practice nursing assessment and interventions based on the Standards of Psychiatric/Mental Health Clinical Nursing Practice in a variety of clinical settings across the continuum of care. This course requires 45 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2250, NUR 2350, NUR 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 3450CL

NUR 3550
Medical/Surgical Nursing II for the BSN
5

Focuses on medical/surgical issues of the older adult population and support system with an emphasis on health promotion. Personal values, attitudes, and feelings about aging, transitions, and dying will be explored. Common disorders of body systems and the use of pharmacological agents in the aged are emphasized. Hospice care will be explored including history, philosophy, and services provided. Special needs of the care giver will be addressed. A clinical component will accompany this course in which students will have the opportunity to engage in caring relationships with older adult population. This course requires 45 theory hours and 90 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2250, NUR 2350, NUR 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 3550CL

NUR 3650
Child and Family Nursing for the BSN
4

Focuses on issues of children and their families with an emphasis on the application of the nursing process. Normal growth and development, common disorders of body systems and the use of pharmacological agents in children are explored. Students will have the opportunity to apply knowledge and skills to the care of children and families, through application of the nursing process to this patient population in a variety of settings. A multidisciplinary team approach and effective communication is emphasized. This course requires 45 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2250, NUR 2350, NUR 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 3650CL

NUR 3750
Maternal/Child Nursing for the BSN
4

Introduces students to the developing family during the childbearing time as a focus for nursing. The emphasis is placed on the care of the mother as well as the care of the fetus and newborn. The nursing process is utilized in assessment of all elements and phases of pregnancy, planning, providing and evaluating nursing interventions that promote optimal wellness. The effects of culture, ethnic, and economic influences as well as the interaction with the extended family and/or community will be discussed. In addition, the complications of pregnancy and pregnancy outcomes that threaten the childbearing family will be examined from both physiologic and psychosocial aspects. Assists students in applying theory and developing competence in utilizing the nursing process to provide care for families in the childbearing cycle. 45 hours of theory and 45 hours of clinical experience are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 2250, NUR 2350

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 3750CL

NUR 4150
Medical/Surgical Nursing III for the BSN
5

Applies comprehensive knowledge and skills gained through the nursing program to medical-surgical, critical care, emergency, and perioperative phases as they occur across the healthcare continuum. Understanding of the role of the professional nurse expands to include multidisciplinary teamwork and collaboration. Advanced assessment skills are used in the clinical setting to recognize the complex, changing needs of adult patients with multiple health issues. Students will apply leadership and management skills to delegate and facilitate safe quality care at a complex level. This course requires 45 theory hours and 90 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3450, NUR 3550, NUR 3050, NUR 3750, NUR 3650, NUR 3150

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 4150CL

NUR 4250
Nursing Leadership for the BSN
3

Emphasizes further development of the professional nursing role by exploring contemporary trends in leadership and management. Important concepts are covered such as quality and safety measures, financial factors, effective leadership concepts, and decision-making techniques. Personal leadership styles and values will be identified, and students will enhance leadership competencies by examining self in relation to professional standards, the nursing code of ethics, effective communications, and leadership theories and models. This course requires 30 theory hours and 45 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 4150, NUR 3450, NUR 3550, NUR 3050, NUR 3750, NUR 3650, NUR 3150

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 4250CL

NUR 4350
Nursing Synthesis for the BSN
4

Provides nursing students with the opportunity to demonstrate achievement of program outcomes. Under the direction and supervision of course faculty and individual clinical preceptor students begin the transition to independent practitioner. Emphasis is placed on self-directed learning and evaluation in selected clinical areas. This course requires 15 theory hours and 135 clinical hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 4250, Permission from Campus Program Director

Concurrent requisite(s):
NUR 4350CL

NUR 4450
Community Health Nursing
3

Examines the core functions and current organization of community health nursing as part of the larger healthcare system. Concentration is placed on achievement of optimal health outcomes for target populations and selected vulnerable subgroups within the community. The role of nursing will be examined in relation to public policy and emergency response and management. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350

NUR 4452
Community Health Nursing Practic m
3

Focuses on the application of community health and nursing principles in the care of individuals, families, and selected vulnerable subgroups within a variety of community health settings. Nurses serve as advocates, caregivers, leaders and teachers as they apply the nursing process to communities with a focus on epidemiology, environmental health, and emergency response and management. Must complete with a B- or better. Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350, NUR 4450

NUR 4550
Nursing Leadership and Management
3

Emphasizes further development of the professional nurse role by exploring contemporary trends in leadership and management of human and financial resources. Focus is on the importance of communication in the development of effective management and leadership skills. Personal leadership styles and values will be identified, and students will enhance leadership competencies by examining self in relation to professional standards, the nursing code of ethics, and leadership theories and models. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350

NUR 4552
Nursing Leadership and Managemen Practicum
3

Focuses on the development of the role of the professional nurse leader through the application of effective communication, leadership and management theory. Communication skills, various management and leadership theories, economic considerations, scope of practice standards and ethics will be integrated into leadership and management of others in the provision of health care. Must complete with a B- or better. Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350, NUR 4550

NUR 4650
Global Health
3

Introduces students to the main concepts of global health and the link between global health and socio-economic development. This course will focus on measurement of health status, burden of disease, risk factors, and vulnerable populations. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350 or NUR 3050. NUR 3150, NUR 3450, NUR 3550, NUR 3750, NUR 3650

NUR 4750
Pathophysiology for the Nurse
3

Examines alterations in functions affecting individuals across the lifespan. Students will examine pathophysiological concepts utilizing biology, microbiology, and physiological sciences as a basis for nursing practice. The scientific approach will be utilized to increase understanding of the disease process from the cellular to the multi-system level. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 3210, NUR 3250, NUR 3310, NUR 3350 or NUR 3050. NUR 3150, NUR 3450, NUR 3550, NUR 3750, NUR 3650

NUR 4850
Nursing Seminar
3

Allows students to synthesize information obtained in this program to explore how the professional nurse can impact healthcare policy as well as how healthcare policy impacts nursing science, practice and education. Students will analyze nursing policy and position statements; political, environmental, and cultural issues; changing nursing roles; and the delivery of quality nursing care in an evolving world. Students will need to identify a preceptor, who holds a minimum of a BSN degree, to assist with the course project. Must complete with a B- or better. Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 4450, NUR 4452, NUR 4550, NUR 4552, NUR 4650 or NUR 4750

NUR 5110
Leadership and Advanced Nursing Practice Roles
3

Provides an overview of advanced roles of graduate nursing practice, with a focus on specialty roles in nursing. Issues involving ethics, scope of practice and credentialing will be addressed as students transition into their selected specialty roles.

NUR 5210
Organization, Delivery and Policy in Healthcare
3

Focuses on health care organizations and delivery of care. Students will understand public policies on issues affecting nursing and healthcare. Content includes economic and organizational theory, current issues in nursing, trends in health care delivery, political, social, ethical and fiscal accountability from a global perspective.

NUR 5310
Nursing Theory and Research
3

Provides students with the knowledge to translate ethical evidence into practice and identify gaps where evidence is lacking. Students will focus on methodology, statistical analysis, and problem identification.

NUR 5410
Informatics and Healthcare Technologies
3

Provides an in-depth study of information technology as it is utilized in healthcare organizations. Students will compare and contrast the tools, processes, and strategies available to manage information, data, and software and hardware in healthcare organizations. Practical applications will be emphasized and students will analyze the impact of information systems and technology to work more efficiently, allocate resources and improve patient care.

NUR 5510
Quality Improvement, Outcomes Management, and Population Health
3

Requires students to be able to articulate the methods, tools, performance measures, and safety standards as they related to quality. Students will analyze their role as effective leaders and change agents based on quality principles. Focus is on measures to assure optimal patient outcomes in multiple environments, with emphasis on population health.

NUR 6110
Advanced Health Assessment and Pharmacology
3

Building on basic assessment skills, this course focuses on mastery of advanced health assessment skills, including history taking, interviewing, collection of data, and documentation of findings. Content provides a foundation for decision making and the management of care. This will be coupled with an understanding of the principles of pharmacodynamics and the pharmacodynamics management of common acute and chronic illness. Note: Students are responsible for identifying preceptors in consultation with course faculty. Credit Hours: 3 (2 hours didactic, 1 hour practicum = 45 practice hours) Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6150
Advanced Pathophysiology
3

Focuses on the study of cell structure as a foundation for understanding physiological and pathological processes. Normal human physiology will serve as the foundation to examine and understand the pathophysiology of common diseases, including incidence, etiology, manifestations, and prognosis.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6210
Instructional Strategies for Nursing Education
3

Focuses on instructional delivery, including simulation and advanced technology. A focus on teacher behaviors that promote student centered learning will be explored. Additionally, education of hospital staff and patients will be addressed.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6240
Curriculum Development for Nursing Education
3

Focuses on best practices for curriculum development, including pedagogy and andragogy, in nursing education. As an overview of nursing education, students will examine the current legal and ethical frameworks of nursing education, accreditation standards and processes.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6270
Evaluation Strategies for Nursing Education
3

Focuses on program evaluation utilizing advanced technologies. Students will explore the components of a systematic evaluation plan and identify evaluation tools for educational assessment, both in the classroom and clinical environment.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6410
Foundations of Nursing Administration
3

Focuses on the scope and standards of practice, study of the best practice in nursing administration. Emphasis is placed on planning, implementing and evaluating nursing service in acute, chronic and community-based healthcare facilities.

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 5110, NUR 5210, NUR 5310, NUR 5410, NUR 5510

NUR 6810
Practicum in Nursing Education
3

Students will work directly with a preceptor to examine and deepen knowledge and skills in nursing education. The class provides students with practical experience in academic nursing education in the classroom, in clinical and in the online environment. The major focus of the practicum experience is to synthesize knowledge and demonstrate skills to assure program outcomes. Note: Students are responsible for identifying preceptors in consultation with course faculty (3 credit hours practicum – 135 practice hours) Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
NUR 6110, NUR 6150, NUR 6210, NUR 6240, NUR 6270

NUR 6860
Practicum in Nursing Administrat ion
4

Students will work directly with a preceptor to examine and deepen knowledge and skills in nursing administration. The major focus of the practicum experience is to synthesize knowledge and demonstrate skills to assure program outcomes. Note: Students are responsible for identifying preceptors in consultation with course faculty (4 hours practicum = 180 hours) Professional Liability Insurance

Prerequisite(s):
BUS 6720, BUS 7530, BUS 7590, NUR 6410

OCC 1010
Foundations of Occupational Therapy
2

Introduces students to the concepts of the profession including the Practice Framework and the threads of the curriculum (client-centered, occupation-based intervention, and professional ethics). The various levels of the profession are explained as well as the credentialing process. The application for the program is distributed in this course and it is a prerequisite for acceptance. This is the first course in occupational therapy offered in the curriculum and is therefore a foundation course. Must complete with a B- or better.

OCC 2220
Therapeutic Use of Occupations
5

Provides students with an understanding of activities and their historical implications in the practice of occupational therapy. Activity analysis will be explored in detail. Analysis opportunities will occur in areas like activities of daily living/self-care and leisure skills. Crafts and the use of mediums will be presented to assist students with understanding the importance of being able to teach life tasks. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 2220L

OCC 2330
Occupational Centered Theory
5

Focuses on the application of the Occupational Therapy Practice Framework through advanced task analysis and adaptation. Students are instructed in current theories and frames of reference utilized in occupational therapy practice. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 2550
Assessment of Occupational Engagement
3

Introduces the concepts of occupational therapy assessment. This course includes a discussion of the processes involved for choosing assessment tools and types of assessments; the relation of the assessment process to the performance areas of self-care, work, play, and leisure skill areas; and a discussion of the assessment of physical function including range of motion and manual muscle testing, sensory, neuromotor, cognitive and psychosocial performance components. An overview of the physiologic dimensions of activity and assessment is provided. Students are required to use hands-on experience in using assessment in a simulated test situation. Recent literature on assessment is reviewed. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2220

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 2550L

OCC 3020
Mental Health Conditions and Occupational Dysfunction
3

Outlines conditions and disorders including etiology and clinical progression from adulthood to late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3060
Complementary Therapies, Wellness and Occupation
3

Focuses on the basic concepts, evolution, utilization, and legislative issues surrounding wellness, complementary, and integrative therapies used in treatment. Students will experience the use of complementary/integrative therapies to enhance personal wellness and clinical skills. Must complete with a B- or better.

OCC 3130
Professional Roles, Responsibilities and Practice Areas
3

Introduces the organization, administrative structure, and functions of occupational therapy service programs. Emphasis is on communication techniques, differentiating the levels of functions of staff and legal implications of service delivery. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 3130L

OCC 3140
Documentation in the Healthcare System
3

Provides students, in a laboratory-based setting, with a hands-on opportunity to develop documentation skills centered around a problem-based format. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

OCC 3210
Level I Fieldwork (Children)
2

Provides field observation of children of varying ages and needs. Students have the opportunity to observe and consider the implication a disability has on development. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie the observations to the occupational therapy process. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3310
Child Development and the Implications of Pathology/ Conditions
3

Examines child development from birth through 18. This course covers reflexes and motor and sensory development through age 5 in detail. Pathology/conditions and their implications to development are discussed thoroughly. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 3410
Disease/Injury and Occupational Dysfunction
3

Studies disease/injuries, including etiology and clinical progression from young through late adulthood. The impact on performance and implication to independent functioning will be discussed. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 3140

OCC 3510
The Aging Process and the Implications of Pathology/ Conditions
3

Completes the study of normal development and performance through adulthood and the older adult. Introduces specific diseases/conditions commonly experienced by the older adult. Current concepts addressing prevention and community resources are explored. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 4020
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies I
5

Emphasizes application of theory to practice with an adult population. Intervention strategies to assist people with regaining performance are covered. Consideration is also given to conditions seen frequently in practice settings. This course requires students to prioritize needs and demonstrate proficiency with common modalities. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4020L

OCC 4030
Program Planning/Intervention Strategies II
5

Emphasizes assessment, treatment planning, and development of intervention strategies with the older adult. Strategies designed to enhance/retain performance with emphasis on quality of life are presented. Performance areas including activities of daily living, work, and play or leisure are analyzed as applied to this population. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 4020

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4030L

OCC 4220
Occupational Therapy and Case Management
4

Students will investigate services that assist people in regaining performance/independence. A weekly seminar provides the instructor with the opportunity to tie community services to the occupational therapy process. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2330

OCC 4350
Personal and Environmental Adaptations
5

Includes designing and restructuring the physical environment to assist self-care, work, play, and leisure performance. Emphasis is on architectural barriers and utilization of wheelchairs and other equipment. Includes in-depth study of assistive technology, principles of wellness, ergonomics, work hardening, work site, and job analysis. 75 hours of lecture and 150 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4350L

OCC 4550
Community-Based Occupational Therapy
5

Focuses on the student's ability to understand and appreciate the role of occupational therapy in home and community settings utilizing evidence-based practice and current models of service delivery. This course explores a variety of roles for the occupational therapist in community-based settings. Students will learn to apply the philosophical roots of occupational therapy to contemporary practice. In addition, students will gain an overview of funding sources, governmental policies, and documentation needs relevant to community-based practice. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OCC 2550

Concurrent requisite(s):
OCC 4550L

OCC 5010
Program Planning/Intervention (Childhood)
4

Covers assessment and the development of treatment strategies using current frames of reference in detail. Students are prepared to apply theoretical concepts in practice settings serving children.

OCC 5050
Assessment and Treatment Interventions for Mental Health Practice
4

Covers mental health assessment and treatment strategies using psychosocial frames of reference and evidence based research. Therapeutic use of self, occupation, and group processes are emphasized.

OCC 5110
Occupational Therapy Research I
2

Provides students with skills in utilizing methodologies of research by applying them to occupational therapy practices. Students will analyze research literature and learn how to prepare research proposals.

OCC 5210
Upper Extremity Rehabilitation I
4

Builds on knowledge gained in clinical kinesiology. Students will learn upper extremity anatomy in detail through lecture and clinical application. Emphasis will be on using knowledge of the upper extremity to develop clinical reasoning skills for the rehabilitation of upper extremity dysfunction.

OCC 5220
Upper Extremity Rehabilitation I I
2

Focuses on the selection, fit, and fabrication of splints.  This course includes related topics of hand therapy assessment and treatment, modalities, and wound care.

OCC 5410
Leadership and Management Roles in Occupational Therapy Practice
2

Focuses on developing leadership and management skills necessary in occupational therapy service delivery. Students will learn how to facilitate high quality care for clients while being responsive to productivity and reimbursement standards. Topics include, but are not limited to, legislative advocacy, personnel management, consultation, new program marketing, professional competency, and ethics.

OCC 5610
Level I Fieldwork (Adults)
1

Provides field observation in settings that offer services for the older adult. Students consider implications of the aging process and the need to retain skills/performance. A weekly seminar provides the student with the opportunity to tie the observations to the occupational therapy process.

OCC 6120
Occupational Therapy Research II
3

Allows the students the opportunity to design, develop, and implement a research project utilizing skills from occupational therapy experiences and the statistical course sequence.

OCC 6310
Case Based Clinical Reasoning
4

Utilizing a problem-based approach, students are guided through the process of applying clinical reasoning principles to a variety of cases. Clinical observations and case assignments will be utilized to reflect on and process experiences. Ethical issues related to treatment and service provision will be discussed.

OCC 6610
Level I Fieldwork (Psychological and Social Factor(s)
2

Provides supervised opportunities in the community to design, deliver, and evaluate service programing in traditional and emerging areas of practice that has as its focus psychological and social factors. Emphasis will be on the application of knowledge in real world settings.

OCC 6710
Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork
5

Provides a full-time, three-month clinical affiliation in a setting which provides students with experience in an occupational therapy practice. Students must complete all OT major coursework and gain approval by the program director of the Occupational Therapy program before enrolling in this course.

OCC 6720
Occupational Therapy Level II Fieldwork
5

Provides a full-time, three-month clinical affiliation in a setting which provides students with experience in an occupational therapy practice. Students must complete all OT major coursework and gain approval by the program director of the Occupational Therapy program before enrolling in this course. Students must achieve 80% or better in all course work and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

OPT 1010
Introduction to Orthotic/ Prosthetic Technology
4

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of orthotics and prosthetics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the materials and equipment involved in the fabrication of orthotic and prosthetic devices. Fabrication of thermoplastic, thermoset resin, aluminum, and steel projects will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, HSC 1210, HSC 1211

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 1010L

OPT 2010
Foot and Ankle Orthotics and Prosthetics
5

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history, disorders, and information related to diabetic foot care, foot orthoses, shoe modifications, partial foot and Symes prosthetics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and bony landmarks of the foot and ankle. Fabrication of the UCBL, foot orthoses, shoe modifications, partial feet and Symes prostheses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2110, OPT 2110L, OPT 2210, OPT 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2010L

OPT 2050
Upper Extremity Orthotics and Prosthetics
5

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of upper extremity orthotics and prosthetics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal upper extremity anatomy and bony landmarks. They will acquire knowledge of pathologies and associated disorders of the upper extremity that are addressed with orthotic and prosthetic care. Fabrication of humeral fracture orthoses, hand and wrist orthoses, transradial prostheses, and transhumeral prostheses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2010L, OPT 2110, OPT 2110L, OPT 2210, OPT 2210L

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2250, OPT 2250L, OPT 2310, OPT 2310L

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2050L

OPT 2110
Lower Extremity Orthotic Systems
5

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of lower extremity orthotics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and bony landmarks of lower extremity biomechanics and pathologies for which orthotic intervention is indicated. Fabrication of various plastic, metal and hybrid lower extremity orthoses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2010L, OPT 2110, OPT 2110L

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2110L

OPT 2210
Transtibial Prosthetics
5

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of transtibial prosthetics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy, bony landmarks, biomechanics, and disorders of the transtibial amputee. Fabrication of exoskeletal and endoskeletal prostheses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2010L, OPT 2110, OPT 2110L

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2210L

OPT 2250
Transfemoral Prosthetics
4

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of transfemoral prosthetics. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy, bony landmarks, biomechanics, and disorders affecting the transfemoral amputee. Fabrication of transfemoral prostheses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2010L, OPT 2110, OPT 2110L, OPT 2210, OPT 2210L

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2010L, OPT 2050, OPT 2310, OPT 2310L

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2250L

OPT 2310
Spinal Orthotics
4

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the history of spinal orthoses. Students will acquire a working knowledge of musculoskeletal anatomy and bony landmarks of the spine and torso. They will also acquire knowledge of pathologies and disorders of the spine and torso. Fabrication of spinal orthoses will be completed by students in the lab portion of this course. 30 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2010L, OPT 2110, OPT 2110L, OPT 2210, OPT 2210L

Corequisite(s):
OPT 2050, OPT 2050L, OPT 2250, OPT 2250L

Concurrent requisite(s):
OPT 2310L

OPT 2510
Orthotics/Prosthetic Clinical Internship
4

Introduces orthotic/prosthetic technology students to the public and private practice. Students will acquire a working knowledge of the orthotic and prosthetic lab and participate in the fabrication of orthoses and prostheses devices for patients. This is the externship portion of the program. 240 hours are required by accreditations standards. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

OPT 2910
Orthotic/Prosthetic Technology Review (Capstone)
3

Focuses on the didactic lectures and lab learning exercises which review the subject matter needed to successfully complete the American Board For Certification Technician examinations. The course will consist of a review of already acquired knowledge and technical skills. Students’ areas of test weaknesses and strengths will be identified through practice exams with instructor feedback. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OPT 2010, OPT 2050, OPT 2110, OPT 2210, OPT 2250, OPT 2310

OTA 1110
Introduction to Occupational Therapy Assisting
1

Introduces students to the foundations, history, philosophy, and development of occupational therapy. The scope of occupational therapy practice and organizations will be defined. Delineation between the roles and functions of the registered occupational therapist and occupational therapy assistant will be emphasized. Initial observation experiences in at least two different occupational therapy settings are required. Must complete with a B - or better.

OTA 1210
Clinical Pathology and Occupations
3

Focuses on the impact upon occupations due to specific orthopedic, neurological, rheumatological, and medical conditions. Must complete with a B- or better.

OTA 2010
OTA Clinical Documentation and Health Records
2

Introduces Occupational Therapy Assistant students to clinical documentation and health records. Must complete with a C or better.

OTA 2050
OTA Principles and Applications Principles and Applications in Mental Health
3

Introduces OTA students to the role of occupational therapy in the mental health setting and discusses mental disorders commonly seen in occupational therapy. Provides the foundation for instruction in the therapeutic use of activities and treatment from acute to chronic care. The scope of the lecture primarily deals with adolescence through adult; however a section on childhood psychiatric disorders will be included. Must complete with a C or better.

OTA 2110
OTA Clinical Techniques in Mental Health
3

Emphasizes occupational therapy therapeutic skills and techniques such as patient observation, interview skills, group dynamics, process, and interaction skills/techniques. Students will participate in the selection, analysis and implementation of therapeutic activities for daily living and leisure/play tasks specific to the mental health setting. Content encompasses the role of group dynamics and process applications in mental health occupational therapy intervention. Must complete with a C or better.

OTA 2150
Fundamentals in OTA Practice
3

Focuses on fundamental practice issues in occupational therapy, including standards of practice, COTA supervision, the therapeutic intervention process, medical documentation, team interaction, and management of therapy service. Professional ethics, legal aspects, insurance reimbursement, and quality assurance are introduced. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
OTA 2150L

OTA 2210
OTA Principles and Applications of Physical Dysfunction
3

Focuses on the role of occupational therapy in the evaluation, assessment, and treatment intervention for physical dysfunction. The scope of the course ranges from acute care through long-term rehabilitation, with a primary emphasis from adolescence through adulthood. Therapeutic skills and techniques for program planning and implementation are heavily incorporated into the course. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2250

Corequisite(s):
OTA 2310

Concurrent requisite(s):
OTA 2210L

OTA 2250
Neurological Foundations of Motor Control
2

Focuses on the neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems as it relates to normal motor control and sensory integration. The neurological foundations of therapeutic exercise principles are introduced. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
OTA 2310

OTA 2310
OTA Clinical Techniques in Physical Dysfunction
3

Provides OTA students with an opportunity to study, integrate, apply, and practice therapeutic skills and activities utilized in the area of physical dysfunction throughout the lifespan. Must complete with a C or better.

Corequisite(s):
OTA 2210

OTA 2350
Geriatric Patient Care
2

Explores the psychosocial and physical aspects of aging and the role of occupational therapy with the older adult. Treatment planning, application, and preventative strategies are explored in the performance areas of activities of daily living, leisure, and work. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2150

OTA 2410
Elements of Therapeutic Media
3

Introduces OTA students to therapeutic activity and various forms of media utilized in occupational therapy treatment settings. Students develop and apply critical thinking and problem-solving skills to identify, analyze, and adapt purposeful activities in the areas of self-care, work, and leisure. Extensive activity analysis and application to various patient care areas are emphasized. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2150

Concurrent requisite(s):
OTA 2410L

OTA 2510
OTA Principles and Applications in Pediatrics
2

Introduces students to the implementation of occupational therapy in the developmental disability setting with a primary emphasis on ages birth through 26 years. Students will review the following aspects of childhood developmental disabilities: etiology, symptomatology, prognosis, and deviations from normal development. This course discusses the basic objectives of occupational therapy treatment procedures, medical, and safety precautions. A section of this course focuses on the developmentally disabled adult as well. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2150

OTA 2610
Fieldwork Fundamentals
2

Provides Occupational Therapy Assistant students with the preparation for their fieldwork experience. The areas reviewed are: ethical and professional behavior, liability, communication skills, reinforcement of academic knowledge, and treatment selection/application. This course provides OTA students with case study applications, in-servicing, and clinical preparation. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2720

OTA 2710
Level I Fieldwork A
1

Provides clinical observation of client services in various community and clinical settings. Observation skills, individual and group interaction, and documentation are emphasized and integrated into the occupational therapy process with concurrent OTA coursework. 15 hours of lecture and 40 clinical hours are required. Must complete with a C or better.

OTA 2720
Level I Fieldwork B
1

Provides clinical observation of client services in the area of physical dysfunction. Observation skills, treatment implementation, and documentation are emphasized and integrated into the occupational therapy process with concurrent OTA coursework. 15 hours of lecture and 40 clinical hours are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2710

OTA 3710
Level II Fieldwork A
3

Provides an unpaid affiliation in the clinical setting, performing the delivery of occupational therapy services under the supervision of an occupational therapy practitioner. Students must complete a minimum of 320 hours (or the equivalent of eight weeks, full-time) for this fieldwork experience. The clinical site will assess clinical competency including clinical decision-making skills and professionalism.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2210

OTA 3720
Level II Fieldwork B
3

Provides an unpaid affiliation in the clinical setting, performing the delivery of occupational therapy services under the supervision of an occupational therapy practitioner. Students must complete a minimum of 320 hours (or the equivalent of eight weeks, full-time) for this fieldwork experience. The clinical site will assess clinical competency including decision-making skills and professionalism. This is a capstone course. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
OTA 2210

OTA 3750
OTA Board Review

Provides the OTA student with a comprehensive review in preparation for the National Board Certification in Occupational Therapy (NBCOT) examination. This review will include all domain areas of the examination. Students will be required to satisfactorily complete a mock certification examination. Must complete with a C or better.

PAR 1010
Law, Legal Profession, and Terminology
3

Provides a basic understanding of the procedural and practical aspects of being a paralegal. Emphasis is on legal terminology, legal concepts, skills needed to perform paralegal tasks, and the ethical considerations involved. Must complete with a C or better.

PAR 1150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis I
3

Provides students with a general understanding of the nature of legal research including book research, online legal research tools, and legal citation forms using specific techniques and methodologies. Students will develop research strategies that will enable them to begin drafting documents. The mechanics of the construction of documents will be examined. Students will learn how to review and analyze case law and legal materials in the preparation of writing case briefs, pleadings, and motions. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

PAR 1410
Law Office Technology, Management, and Ethics
3

Introduces basic legal software and computer technology utilized in an office. Topics include billing, time slips, electronic filing, docketing and calendaring, hiring and supervision of personnel, delegation of work to associates and legal assistants, and the ethical implications of each. Must complete with a C or better.

PAR 2010
Torts
3

Introduces students to tort law, including intentional torts such as assault and battery; torts based on the failure to use reasonable care such as negligence; and strict liability torts, which make the actor liable without any fault for dangerous activities such as mining and blasting operations. In the introduction of negligence, students will become familiar with the four elements of all negligence lawsuits, which include duty, breach of duty, proximate causation, and damages. Major areas of tort litigation will be examined including products liability. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2110
Criminal Law and Procedures
3

Introduces students to the various offenses that constitute a crime as well as the general principles of culpability and justification. Constitutional safeguards and procedures necessary from arrest through the trial, sentencing, and punishment will be examined. The First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments will be examined. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis II
3

Provides a capstone experience in legal research and writing for the paralegal program. This course will reinforce and continue to develop the high level research skills necessary for today's paralegals. Manual and CALR methods will be expounded upon for further skill refinement. Written and oral communications will continue to be a focus as students demonstrate their proficiency in this area through an extensive legal research project that requires them to produce the applicable legal documentation and then present their findings as they would in the legal setting. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1150

PAR 2310
Wills, Trusts, and Probate Administration
3

Familiarizes students with the basic elements of a will, types of wills as well as the responsibilities of a personal representative. Classes of trusts and rules governing trusts will be examined. Discussion will include the purposes of estate planning, probate forms and procedures, and guardianships. Students will assess and analyze tax ramifications of estate plans as well as the different classifications of property. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2410
Contract Law
3

Introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices associated with contract law. Topics include the elements of a binding legal contract, such as the offer, acceptance, and consideration, the distinction between the common law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) treatment of contracts, the study of sales transactions and commercial contracts, an analysis of the concept of performance and the legal remedies available for breach of contract, and the preparation of valid contractual agreements. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2710
Family Law
3

Introduces students to the areas of law related to marriage, divorce, separation, annulment, guardianship, and adoption. Topics discussed may include custody, child support, alimony, property distribution, and domestic partnerships, as well as the role of the attorney and paralegal in interviewing, determining jurisdiction, counseling, investigating, drafting, serving and filing of legal papers. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 2910
Civil Litigation
3

Introduces students to the stages of a lawsuit, including pretrial, trial, and post-trial procedures. Preparation of pleadings, motions, and subpoenas will be examined. This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of discovery including interviewing techniques and case investigations. The Michigan Court Rules will also be examined. This course provides a capstone experience for the paralegal student, taking a case from its inception to conclusion. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2150

PAR 3150
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis III
3

Teaches advanced legal drafting and writing. Students will not only use manual legal materials and online legal databases, but will be exposed to other research sources as well. Students will continue to review and analyze case law and legal materials in the preparation of writing pleadings, motions and memoranda, trial and/or appellate briefs, and research summaries. Unique problems of legal research will be explored. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2150

PAR 3350
Healthcare and Insurance Law
3

Provides an overview of the current issues in healthcare and insurance law. Topics may include malpractice by physicians and hospitals, tort reform and its impact on the health system, a discussion of insurance coverage, including private health insurance policies, Medicare, Medicaid, disability, long-term care and no-fault insurance, issues relating to access to healthcare as well as access to records, HIPAA and confidentiality of patient information, and advance directives. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3410
Elder Law
3

Provides an overview of the legal issues facing our aging population. Topics covered may include estate planning, health and personal care planning, advance directives, financial powers of attorney, availability of benefits including Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans, Medicare and Medicaid, alternative housing arrangements such as assisted living facilities and nursing homes, elder abuse and neglect, and ethical issues inherent in the area of elder law.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010, PAR 2310

PAR 3450
Alternative Dispute Resolution
3

Provides an overview of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) as an alternative to traditional litigation. The basic methods of ADR, including binding as well as non-binding arbitration, mediation and negotiation, will be discussed. Students will learn the main areas where disputes often arise, how one or more methods of ADR apply, and how to determine the most appropriate method for resolving a matter. Topics covered may include the various forms of ADR, the application of ADR to specific disputes in various areas of the law, sources of ADR services, and the role of the paralegal in ADR. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3510
Property and Real Estate Law
3

Exposes students to the practical side of real property transactions, emphasizing the residential process. Students will learn about preparing and recording documents for transfer of title, including purchase and sale agreements, mortgages and deeds, financing, the closing process, and landlord-tenant relationships. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3610
Employment and Labor Law
3

Provides an overview of the laws that deal with the employment relationship, such as hiring and firing, wages and benefits, hours and overtime, and working conditions. Topics covered may include the various types of discrimination, federal wage and hour regulation, the concept of at-will employment, labor law, privacy laws, harassment in the workplace, workplace injuries and remedies, and employee handbooks. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 3710
Debtor/Creditor Law (Bankruptcy)
3

Introduces and familiarizes students with the legal issues, rights and remedies involving debtors and creditors. Topics covered may include Chapter 7 bankruptcy liquidation, Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization, and Chapter 13 wage-earner plans, as well as the areas of receivership, garnishments, secured creditors, and liens. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4210
Administrative Law
3

Provides an overview of administrative law, namely those rules and regulations set forth by agencies of government whether at the state, local or federal level. We will address the function of administrative agencies, as well as how these agencies operate. Topics may include rule-making, constitutional and statutory limitations on agency operation, and specific administrative policies. The course will also discuss the role of the paralegal and the possibility of paralegal representation during administrative hearings. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4310
Advanced Legal Technology and Software
3

Provides students with hands-on practical application of specialized legal software and computer technology in the legal setting. Topics may include a more advanced discussion of technology and software options introduced in introductor/previous courses and may include time management, billing, calendaring and docketing, document management, word processing, legal research, litigation support and trial presentation software, and specialty areas of law. Electronic filing and discovery, as well as the paperless office, will also be examined. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4350
Immigration Law
3

Provides an overview of the structure of immigration law, practice and procedure. Students will learn how to recognize the legal issues, prepare petitions and applications, and learn when, why, and where filings should be made. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of immigration law, as well as the general procedures, terminology, and agencies that are involved in this area of law. Topics may include completing standard immigration forms, researching immigration law, and accessing government and other online materials relating to this field. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4410
Business Organizations
3

Examines the different forms of business organizations, including sole proprietorships, partnerships, corporations, and limited liability companies. Students will learn the distinguishing characteristics of different business entities, the benefits and limitations of each of them, and the legal processes necessary for their formation. The respective rights, duties, and liabilities of businesses' officers, directors and shareholders, business disputes, and corporate dissolutions are studied. Students will learn to draft appropriate documents for the formation of Michigan business organizations and will apply legal reasoning and legal analysis to particular fact patterns to assess legal issues and reach conclusions about the legality, validity, appropriateness, or resolution of particular issues involving business organizations. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4450
Intellectual Property Law
3

Covers the field of intellectual property law, including the areas of copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets and patents. Students will gain a basic background in intellectual property law and will be introduced to the skills that are required of an intellectual property paralegal. Topics may include ownership of works, the fair use doctrine, registration of copyrights, trademarks and patents, infringement of rights, trade secrets, and use of online research tools in the area of intellectual property. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 1010

PAR 4910
Evidence (Litigation II)
3

Provides a capstone experience for the legal studies students and covers an overview of general evidentiary principles and application in the trial process. Topics may include relevancy of evidence, judicial notice, weight and sufficiency of evidence, burden of proof, competency of witnesses, objections to evidence, admissibility, and rules relating to examination and cross-examination of witnesses, including the concept of hearsay and its exceptions. This course will also discuss the role of the paralegal in the litigation process and emphasize the skills necessary for a litigation paralegal. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 2910

PLT 1210
Introduction to Photonics and Lasers
4

Introduces the fundamentals of light, optics, and lasers. Covers the nature and properties of light (such as energy, amplitude, wavelength, frequency, period, phase, propagation). Addresses geometrical optics (reflection, diffraction, imaging, thin lens formula, lens maker's equation), wave optics (interference, diffraction, polarization), and the basic principles and practical applications of lasers. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
PLT 1210L

PLT 2310
Optical Components, Systems and Metrology
3

Introduces students to fiber optics system components including optical fibers, optical sources, amplifiers, couplers, light detectors, and the principles of optical fiber communication systems. Hands-on experiments will provide students experience with fiber splicing, coupling, termination, and loss testing. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310, PLT 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
PLT 2310L

PLT 2350
Fiber Optics and Data Communications
3

Introduces students to fiber optics system components including optical fibers, optical sources, amplifiers, couplers, light detectors, and the principles of optical fiber communication systems. Hands-on experiments will provide students experience with fiber splicing, coupling, termination, and loss testing. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
EET 1150, MTH 1310, PLT 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
PLT 2350L

PLT 2410
Laser Systems
4

Addresses the operating principles and output characteristics of lasers. Introduces Q-switching, mode locking, and frequency doubling. Describes laser types and their applications. Lasers covered include gas, solid-state, semiconductor, diode and fiber lasers. Introduces holography. Students will learn to align and operate a variety of lasers, and use test equipment including power meters, spectrum analyzers, beam profilers and others. Laser safety is emphasized throughout the entire course and program. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1310, PLT 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
PLT 2410L

PLT 2510
Photonics Applications
3

Surveys a variety of photonics and laser applications such as materials processing, laser based non-destructive testing, medical and surgical laser applications, spectroscopy, remote sensing, alternative energy, forensics and others.

Prerequisite(s):
PLT 2410

PLT 2710
Capstone Project
3

Presents students with the opportunity to design, build, test, and demonstrate an electro-optical system based on the knowledge of optical principles and hands-on skills acquired throughout their program. Students will demonstrate communications skills by writing a final project report and giving an oral presentation of their project.

Prerequisite(s):
PLT 2310, PLT 2410

POL 3010
American Political Systems
3

Provides a brief introduction to the political science discipline, and then examines United States government and politics at the national, state, and local levels. Areas of study include the United States Constitution, federalism, representation and participation, the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and civil liberties, domestic and foreign policies, and government and politics in Michigan.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

POL 3010
American Political Systems
3

Provides a brief introduction to the political science discipline, and then examines United States government and politics at the national, state, and local levels. Areas of study include the United States Constitution, federalism, representation and participation, the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and civil liberties, domestic and foreign policies, and government and politics in Michigan.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

POL 3110
International Relations
3

Includes the study of the evolution of the modern international system, International Relations theories, state sovereignty and state power, foreign policy analysis, contemporary conflict and conflict resolution, global terrorism, global economic governance, poverty aid and development globalization, human rights and humanitarian intervention.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

PPM 3010
Project Management
3

Introduces students to the five processes of project management: initiating, planning, executing, controlling, and closing. Topics include an overview of the evolution of project management, tools and techniques, and the project life cycle. Students will gain experience with the basic techniques of project planning, scheduling, execution, and closure.

PPM 3110
Project Planning
3

Expands on student's knowledge of project planning. Topics include project and scope definition, feasibility studies, activity sequencing, and identification of measures of success. Students will learn how to create, plan and effectively use planning tools, including project management software to work with subtasks, assign resources, and resolve time and resource conflicts.

PPM 3210
Negotiation Strategies
3

Provides students with complete coverage of the knowledge, attitude, and skills necessary for success in negotiation. Topics include strategies and techniques for negotiation, different forms of negotiation, ethical and unethical behavior, conflict resolution, and mediation. Students will practice these principles to increase their negotiating ability.

PPM 4010
Project Cost and Budget Management
3

Introduces students to accounting concepts and principles necessary for developing project budgets and monitoring budget costs. This course also covers cost estimation techniques. Students will practice developing a project budget, tracking costs, and reporting financial cost information. Also addresses issues related to risk analysis, risk minimization, risk control, and risk management.

PPM 4110
Leading Project Teams
3

Addresses effective utilization of human resources in project management. Provides an understanding of project leadership techniques, authority and power, motivation, team development, as well as problem solving, decision making, and interpersonal skills. Students will develop an understanding of effective communication techniques for communicating project status as well as recruitment of project team members.

PPM 4210
Contracting and Procurement for Project Managers
3

Explains the contracting and procurement process and the roles and responsibilities of the project manager in successful contracting to meet a project's objectives. Topics include procurement planning and management, preparing statements of work, proposal requests, contractor selection, and types of contracts. Introduces principles of contract and subcontract administration and reviews the differences between government and private purchasing processes.

PPM 4990
Senior Design Project in Project Management
3

Provides students with an opportunity to demonstrate mastery of the nine areas of the project management body of knowledge: scope, quality, time, cost, risk, human resources, procurement, communications, and integration management. This is a capstone course that integrates the content of the other project management and planning courses. Taught in a guided self-study format, students will complete a comprehensive project and prepare for certification tests by taking a practice test.

PSY 1010
Human Relations
3

Provides a psychological foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional settings. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective strategies to improve human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

PSY 1110
General Psychology
3

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

PSY 2010
Cognitive Behavioral Therapy
3

Examines the background, theory, and process of cognitive behavioral therapy. Topics include maladaptive thought patterns and cognitive behavioral therapy solutions, several expressions of cognitive behavior therapy, and cognitive behavior therapy applications to common problems such as fear, anger, addiction, anxiety, and depression.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2110
Psychology of Death and Dying
3

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theories related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 2150
Psychology as a Science and Profession
3

Reviews professions within psychology and application of psychology to other professions. Examines the major historical events and figures relevant to the development of psychology. Students will work to refine and develop their APA writing skills, as well as build on their understanding of research methods and ethics critical to the advancement of psychology. Career options for undergraduate psychology majors will be explored. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, PSY 1010

PSY 2210
Developmental Psychology
3

Examines changes that occur across the human lifespan, from conception to end of life. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2250
Psychology of Drug Use and Addiction
3

Reviews primary categories of legal and illegal drugs and substances. Examines the behavior and mental processes associated with drug use and addiction. Explores environmental, biological, and psychological factors that influence drug use, addiction, and recovery. Various treatment options are discussed. Careers related to substance abuse treatment will be discussed. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150, PSY 2210

PSY 2310
Industrial Organizational Psychology
3

Explores psychological foundations, theories, models, and applications related to selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, organizational culture, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 2410
Theories of Counseling
3

Provides a foundation for understanding the field of counseling. This course examines what counselors do; the qualities of effective counseling; and basic concepts of the most influential theories of modern counseling, considering the strengths and weaknesses of each. It also examines legal, ethical, and cross-cultural issues.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 2510
Cognitive Psychology
3

Explores the psychology of thought, including reception of information, short- and long-term storage, perception, memory, concept formation, language acquisition, problem solving, imagination, and creativity. How people acquire, process, store, and use information will also be explored. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150, PSY 2210

PSY 3010
Forensic Psychology
3

Explores the application of psychology to legal issues and the justice system. Examines major areas of forensic psychology research with focus on police, court, and community settings. Some topics include interrogation, criminal investigation, eyewitness testimony, jury selection, determining competency in court settings, custody and guardianship issues, and risk assessment. Careers related to forensic psychology will be explored. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150

PSY 3050
Health Psychology
3

Explores human health and illness from a biopsychosocial framework. Applies psychological concepts, models, and theories to examine illness prevention and recovery, as well as explore perceptions of illness. Some topics include stress, coping, pain, and behaviors that contribute to wellbeing or illness. Students will discuss strategies to improve healthy habits and wellness. Careers related to health psychology will be explored. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150

PSY 3110
Abnormal Psychology
3

Examines the symptomatology, diagnosis, and causes of various forms of psychopathology. Topics include current theory and research; ethical and social issues; and historical and current approaches to treatment of mental illness.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3150
Community Psychology
3

Examines the historical background, research basis, and guiding principles related to the practice of community psychology. Topics include social change and justice, stress and resilience, professional judgment, and ethics. Addresses systems issues and professional applications to social services, mental health, healthcare, schools, and law enforcement. Future implications for the practice of community psychology are considered. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150

PSY 3210
Psychology of Disability
3

Explores types of disabilities from the individual, family, and caregiver perspectives. Topics include stereotypes and myths, legal issues/laws, coping with disability, and models of practice. Common challenges and solutions associated with disability across various social contexts are discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3350
Human Sexuality
3

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and awareness of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1010 or PSY 1110

PSY 3410
Child Psychology
3

Explores human development from conception through late childhood, with an emphasis on physical, mental, social, and emotional growth. Developmental processes of socialization, cognition, emotional growth, and personality development are examined. Theories about child development are assessed. Research findings on issues and disorders common to children are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210

PSY 3510
Adolescent Psychology
3

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. The emphasis is on establishing skills necessary to work with this group. Areas of focus include physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents. Research findings on issues and disorders common to adolescents are considered.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 3550
Personality Psychology
3

Surveys major studies of personality and theories related to personality development. Discusses how interpersonal behavior is influenced by individual differences and various personality characteristics. Students will be provided opportunities to analyze the results of personality indicators. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150, PSY 2210

PSY 3610
Psychology of Gender
3

Explores the bio/psycho/social influences that contribute to gender similarities and differences. Historical and current theories, myths, and stereotypes will be reviewed. Additional gender related topics include stereotypical roles, identity, cultural influences, attitudes, communication, education, emotions, friendships/relationships, health, sexuality, and work. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2150, PSY 2210

PSY 3660
Research Methods I
3

Provides a foundation for understanding research in the field of psychology. Significant focus on understanding the use and application of quantitative research methods, with a brief introduction to qualitative methods. Students will implement strategies to critically read and evaluate research. Students will explore common research designs, methods, quantitative data analysis, APA standards, and ethical considerations relevant to psychological research. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010, MTH 2750, PSY 2150

PSY 3670
Research Methods II
3

Students continue to gain knowledge and demonstrate appropriate use of research tools, research planning and design, methodologies, and communication of the results using APA standards. Focuses on common qualitative methods, an introduction of mixed methodology, and writing a research proposal. Basic qualitative data analysis methods are explored and practiced. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 3660

PSY 3810
Cross Cultural Psychology
3

Examines how cultural and social structures influence thoughts, attitudes, and behaviors. Some topics include cultural identity development, group values, social and cultural aspects of various groups, and barriers to effective communication and collaboration. Different ethnic groups within Eastern and Western cultures will be explored. Recent psychological research relevant to cultural psychology will be explored. Strategies for improved understanding and productivity in our increasingly diverse world will be discussed. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210, PSY 3670

PSY 3910
Biological Psychology
3

Studies of human brain structure and activity, biochemical and electrical processes, neural patterns, and hormones that underlie human thoughts and behavior. Development of the nervous system, sensory processing of touch and pain, as well as motor control and plasticity will be explored. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210, PSY 3670

PSY 4010
Social Psychology
3

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 1110

PSY 4050
Psychopharmacology
3

Studies the history and development of psychopharmacological agents, their effects on the biochemistry of the human being, the legitimate use of medications, and their importance for treatment. Topics include a review of the classes of psychotropic drugs, drug overdose, the side effects and interactions of psychotropic drugs, and drug tolerance.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 3110

PSY 4110
Clinical Methods in Mental Healt h
3

Examines the multiple careers and settings associated with mental health treatment. Topics include assessment, interviewing, types of counseling, treatment of different populations, legal issues, and ethical considerations within the mental health treatment setting. Treatment interventions, least restrictive options, and prevention will also be discussed.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2410, PSY 3110

PSY 4150
Gerontology
3

Explores aging from the individual, family, and caregiver perspectives. Focuses on physical, cognitive, personality, and social development in late adulthood. Topics include stereotypes and myths, legal issues/laws, common psychological and physical disorders, end of life decisions, relationships, and careers, as well as the dying process, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2210

PSY 4310
Physiological Psychology
3

Studies how brain function and physiological processes influence thoughts and behavior. Primary topics include sensation and perception, regulation processes, emotions, psychopathology, learning and memory, attention, and language. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 3910

PSY 4450
Motivation and Emotion
3

Explores biological, physiological, and psychological processes related to emotion and motivation. Students will examine various types of motivation as well as theories of emotion and motivation. Some additional topics include autonomy, goal setting, beliefs, needs, and social regulation. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 4310

PSY 4610
Learning and Memory
3

Surveys the basic concepts of learning and memory. Topics include brain function and structures related to learning and memory, types of memory, executive control, classical conditioning, operant conditioning, and social learning theory. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 2510, PSY 4310

PSY 4910
Senior Seminar: Psychology
3

Represents the capstone experience for senior psychology majors. The course integrates knowledge, foundational concepts, and skills used in psychological research. Students will have the opportunity to demonstrate the competencies gained from courses taken throughout the undergraduate program, as well as explore their post-graduation goals. This course is exclusive to the Bachelor of Science in Psychology Program (Online only).

PSY 5210
Industrial/Organizational Psychology
3

Provides a generalized overview of the history and development of the I/O psychology specialization. The theoretical underpinnings, research, models, and current applications of I/O psychology will be explored. Applications to the field, at the individual, group, and organizational level will be considered. Behaviors in the workplace and other organizational settings will also be examined. Major topics in I/O psychology will be introduced including: personnel psychology, testing and assessment, organizational behavior and development, training, performance management, motivation, communication, leadership, and group/team dynamics.

PSY 5410
Statistics and Data Analysis
3

Emphasizes the use of statistics and data analysis to facilitate decision making. Explores how research questions and hypotheses influence statistical selection. Students will learn how to select, use, and interpret basic descriptive and inferential statistics, as well as how to read and interpret results in scholarly research articles. Foundations of psychological testing, psychometrics, reliability, and validity will be explored.

PSY 5610
Research Methods
3

Examines common quantitative, qualitative, and mixed methods in psychology. Provides students with the tools to design, conduct, and assess research.  Students develop an understanding of the scientific method of inquiry and the standards associated with conducting systematic empirical research. An examination of the procedures and principles involved with research, including problem formulation, literature review, measurement issues, sampling, research design, data analysis, and report writing, is provided.

PSY 5710
Psychology of Leadership
3

Provides a comprehensive overview of psychological principles of leadership and leader development. Leadership theories, approaches, and models are evaluated and applied. Various assessments, interventions, and strategies related to leadership development will be examined. This course also allows students to apply leadership theories and leader development processes to their professional practices.

PSY 5810
Psychology of Performance and Motivation
3

Examines psychological theories, concepts, and principles related to performance and motivation in the workplace. Current theory in motivation and emotion as it relates to the workplace will be covered.  Emphasis will be placed on measurement, and evaluation of motivation and performance.

PSY 6110
Tests, Measurements, and Assessment in the Workplace
3

Analyzes the theory and practice of psychological measurement and assessment. Psychological testing and psychometrics, reliability, and validity indices, professional standards of test development and use, and the ethical/social/cultural issues of psychological testing and assessment will be explored. Examines the psychometric properties of different types of tests used in organizational settings. Administering, recording, scoring, analyzing, and summarizing test data will be examined and/or practiced.

PSY 6310
Psychology of Training and Learning
3

Provides an overview of the major theories of learning. The implications of learning theories as they relate to workplace settings and needs will be explored. Emphasis will be given to the application of these theories to training and development in the workplace. Topics will include training needs analysis, training design, and program evaluation.

PSY 6410
Psychology of Personnel Management and Human Resources
3

Examines psychological theories, methods, and approaches related to personnel and human resource management, and application to professional practice. Students will explore and apply evidence based practices in regard to personnel selection and placement, affirmative action and equal opportunity, appraisal, attitude measurement, job analysis, motivation of employees, organizational effectiveness, and change management within organizations. Ethical, legal, cultural, and global factors related to HR and personnel management will be explored.

PSY 6510
Individual and Group Factors in the Workplace
3

Provides an overview of social, group, and multicultural factors affecting individual and group behavior. Topics include the development of attitudes, leadership roles, social perception/cognition, social influence, group dynamics, sources of conflict, emotion, and personality. Emphasis will be on how concepts, models, and theories help I/O psychology practitioners understand, assess, and improve the workplace.

PSY 6610
Evidence Based Coaching
3

Examines psychological theories, methods, and approaches that create the framework for evidence based executive coaching. Various coaching applications, models and techniques are examined and practiced. Executive coaching will be explored as a significant strategy for accelerating individual, team and organizational performance. Topics include applying principles of group process and personality theory, leadership development, planning and goal setting and addressing factors that may interfere with effective performance.

PSY 6710
Industrial/Organizational Psychology Residency
3

Provides students the opportunity to attend a residency in order to build knowledge and skills that will enhance their readiness to practice in the field of I/O psychology.  The experience will take place in a learning-centered environment, with ongoing collaboration and interaction among all participants.  A primary element of this course will be attendance and participation in a professional conference.

PSY 6810
Organizational Development, Change, and Consultation
3

Provides an examination of the consultation process as it applies to organizations in stages of development and change. Topics will include major consultation theories, ethics, roles, models, and the dynamics of the consultation relationship when working with organizations, groups, and individuals.  Students will explore organizational development/change strategies and approaches, assessment of needs, evaluation of change development/interventions, and the effects of change on employees and the organization.

PSY 6990
Integrative Capstone in Psychology
3

Integrates theories, skills, and knowledge gained from previous courses. Students will be required to demonstrate their ability to analyze and apply psychological theory, models, research, and best practices to a comprehensive series of cases and tasks related to I/O psychology. This is the capstone course for the Master of I/O Psychology.

PTA 1110
Introduction to PTA
1

Introduces the physical therapist assistant student to the foundations and principles of the profession and the American Physical Therapy Association. Basic theory and practice of physical therapy are emphasized, with a detailed analysis of the boundaries between the physical therapist and the assistant. Ethical standards in practice and legislation governing the utilization of the PTA will also be covered in detail. Scientific research design, psychological reactions to disability, and other issues relating to the profession and patient care are also discussed. 15 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010

PTA 2010
Acute and Long Term Care
2

Provides an in-depth study to analyze the unique physical therapy challenges of the geriatric and acute care patient populations. Topics covered in detail include infection control, burn and open wound management, pharmacological effects on mobility, multiple trauma, circulatory assistive devices, postsurgical management, and orthopedic and neurological conditions common to the acute care environment. 30 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2050
Clinical Documentation for the PTA
1

Explores the utilization of problem-oriented medical records in the rehabilitation setting. Introduces medical documentation for rehabilitation professionals. Examines EHR systems and their role in health care. Includes electronic medical records, SOAP note writing, and chart reviews. 15 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2110
Functional Mobility
2

Examines the levels of independence along the mobility spectrum addressing safety, positioning, and guarding techniques for each level. Bed mobility, wheelchair utilization, assistive device training, and transfers, using proper body mechanics are learned. Normal gait patterns are studied and deviations are reviewed. The primary objective of this course is to familiarize students with methods to optimize patient mobility. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2150
Neurological Foundations of Motor Control
2

Focuses on the neuroanatomy of the central and peripheral nervous systems as it relates to normal motor control and sensory integration. The neurological foundations of therapeutic exercise principles are introduced. Explores the clinical manifestations of lesions to the central nervous system. 30 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2210
Functional Movement Development
2

Focuses on pediatric motor development and infant reflexes as they relate to therapeutic interventions. Human development is covered from birth to death in all domains. Emphasis is placed on gross motor and neuromuscular developmental milestones and physical changes across lifespan. 30 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2250
Clinical Pathology
2

Focuses on an advanced investigation of specific orthopedic, neurological, rheumatological, and medical conditions. Emphasis on therapeutic management of common conditions encountered in a therapy setting. 30 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2310
Patient Assessment
3

Begins the student's experience with patient assessment and data collection. Assessment techniques of goniometry, muscle strength and muscle length testing using standardized methods are learned in lecture and laboratory experiences. Advanced patient assessment of the neurological system including pain assessment, sensory and reflex testing, assessment of dermatomes/myotomes and neural tension testing techniques. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
PTA 2410

PTA 2350
Cardiopulmonary Rehabilitation
2

Examines the management of patient in cardiopulmonary rehabilitation setting. Includes aerobic conditioning, bronchial hygiene and chest physical therapy interventions, and selected cardiopulmonary interventions. 30 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2410
Therapeutic Exercise
3

Covers biomechanical principles as applied to the human body. Exercise physiology in rehabilitation, tissue regeneration, and basic isotonic, isometric, and isokinetic exercise are learned. Students will also be instructed in methodology of basic fitness testing and basic terminology and techniques of extremity manual therapy. Joint assessment and a problem-solving approach to therapeutic exercise prescription are utilized. Joints of the extremities and the truck are systematically reviewed by analyzing pathological conditions and orthopedic management. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
PTA 2310

PTA 2450
Orthopedic Interventions
2

Focus on advanced therapeutic exercise and manual interventions for orthopedic conditions. Reviews basic terminology and techniques of extremity manual therapy. Joint assessment and a problem-solving approach to therapeutic exercise prescription are utilized. Emphasizes muscle stretching, joint mobilizations and other manual therapy techniques. Management of common spinal conditions including assessment, treatment interventions, specialty approaches and manual therapy techniques. Mechanical spinal traction and advanced exercise selection and progression for spinal care will be covered. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2510
Professional Preparation
1

Focuses on professionalism, the role of the interdisciplinary health-care team, effective communication skills, and patient interviewing techniques. Also described in detail are the critical nature of self-assessment, recognition of stressors, and utilization of appropriate coping mechanisms. Presents an overview of the organizational structure in a physical therapy department and orientation to management/supervisory styles. Also described in detail are operational issues impacting the PTA in today's healthcare arena, including documentation guidelines, billing and insurance issues, and total quality improvement. This course will also orient students to the clinical experience process. 15 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2550
Neurological Management
3

Explores pathological conditions and neurological management interventions encountered in physical therapy. Review of clinical neuroanatomy and developmental sequencing as it relates to treatment of patients with neurological impairments at various stages of healing. Common neurological pathologies and their clinical manifestations are discussed. Laboratory participation and the case study approach to patient care decision making is emphasized. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2610
Pediatric Management
2

Explores pathological conditions and neurological management interventions encountered in pediatric physical therapy. Review of clinical neuroanatomy and developmental sequencing as it relates to treatment of pediatric patients with neurological impairments at various stages of healing. Common pediatric neurological pathologies and their clinical manifestations are discussed. Laboratory participation and the case study approach to patient care decision making is emphasized. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2650
Orthotics and Prosthetics for the PTA
1

Focuses on basic orthotics and prosthetics principles are presented including components, upper and lower extremity devices, common gait deviations and interventions, assessment and management of the amputee. 15 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2710
Clinical Education I
2

Provides a two-week full-time, unpaid, practical, work experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. Clinical experience time is integrated with ongoing academic coursework to facilitate the transition from classroom to clinic. Clinical competencies, as expected of a developing clinician, will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. Students are expected to complete assignments as outlined in syllabus. 10 hours of direct instruction/student work and 80 clinical contact hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2720
Clinical Education II
6

Provides an eight-week full-time, unpaid, practical, learning experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. In-services may be required by the clinical site. Clinical competencies will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. 15 hours of direct instruction/ student work and 320 clinical contact hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PTA 2710

PTA 2730
Clinical Education III
6

Provides an eight-week full-time, unpaid, practical, work experience at a clinical setting, performing under the supervision of a licensed physical therapist. In-services may be required by the clinical site. Clinical competencies will be assessed by the student's clinical instructor. A greater emphasis on independence, professional confidence, and competent decision making will be expected in this final clinical experience. 15 hours of direct instruction/student work and 320 clinical contact hours are required. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
PTA 2720

PTA 2750
Physical Agents
2

Explores basic mechanical and electromagnetic physical principles as they relate to physical therapy interventions, including fluid mechanics and particle dynamics, thermodynamics, electricity, magnetism, radiation, Ohm’s Law and the Law of Conservation of Energy. Includes theory, principles of application, and development of technical skills with a variety of physical agent interventions. Thermal agents, sound agents, circulatory assistive devices, and electrotherapy agents are presented with basic competencies evaluated in laboratory experiences. Functional anatomy and basic patient handling skills are reviewed. 15 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2810
PTA Seminar in Specialty Practice
1

Physical therapy advanced specialty seminar. Topics may include aquatic rehabilitation, women’s health, vestibular rehabilitation, oncology rehabilitation, lymphedema management. Assessment and treatment of common diagnoses in these groups are addressed. Other topics may be presented based on community resources and guest presenters. 15 hours of direct instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

PTA 2910
PTA Capstone
1

Provides PTA students with a capstone experience to assimilate previous didactic and clinical material in preparation for sitting for the licensure examination including academic review and application process. Requirements of this course include submission of written case study, submission of portfolio, and sitting for a timed practice licensure examination. 15 hours of blended instruction are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

RAD 1010
Introduction to Radiography
2

Presents an overview of radiographic concepts and skills, including the history of the profession, appropriate use of radiography, basic clinical skills, equipment orientation, and the role of the radiographer within the healthcare team. Specialized imaging terminology, professional ethics, and the guiding principles of the profession are introduced. 30 hours of traditional and hands-on learning are required in a non-energized x-ray facility. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 1210

RAD 1110
Radiologic Procedures I
4

Extends anatomical knowledge and introduces procedures and positioning for exams of the chest, abdomen, upper extremities, and pelvic girdle to the production of diagnostic x-ray images using appropriate projections and positions. Pediatric and mobile imaging are discussed. Image evaluation is introduced. Relevant radiographic pathology are also be discussed. 60 hours of didactic time are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
RAD 1150

RAD 1150
Simulation Lab
1

Radiographic skills are practiced and critiqued. Equipment operation, patient care, and radiologic examination are emphasized. Venipuncture skills are also performed. 45 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
RAD 1110, RAD 2410

RAD 1210
Radiologic Science I
4

Explores the diverse range of diagnostic imaging equipment used in radiographic/fluoroscopic Imaging procedures including machines and generators. Equipment operation and basic concepts of film imaging are discussed. Computed radiography, and digital image production will be investigated. Emphasizes the concepts and tools used to generate x-rays and create images using safe and effective technical factors. 45 hours of didactic time and 30 hours of lab participation are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
RAD 1210L

RAD 1250
Radiation Safety
1

Explores precautionary measures for minimizing patient exposure, protection of personnel, and exposure monitoring methods during diagnostic imaging procedures. 15 didactic hours required. Must complete with a B- or better.

RAD 2120
Radiologic Procedures II
6

Extends anatomical knowledge of the lower extremities, head, spine, and bony thorax to the production of diagnostic x-ray images using appropriate procedure, position, and projection. Specialized exams of organ systems and structures along with the use of contrast material are discussed. Other imaging modalities are introduced. Relevant pathology will be examined. Images will be evaluated for diagnostic quality. 75 didactic hours and 30 lab hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RAD 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
RAD 2120L

RAD 2220
Radiologic Science II
6

Explains concepts in basic and radiation related physics. Equipment components and functions are analyzed. Biological effects of radiation are examined. Quality assurance of the imaging process will be investigated. 75 hours of lecture didactic time and 30 hours of lab participation are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RAD 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
RAD 2220L

RAD 2310
Clinical Applications I
6

Focuses on simple to complex clinical radiologic procedures that are observed and analyzed. The application of student knowledge will be applied to simple examinations. Individual competencies will compare and contrast existing knowledge of variable clinical situations. Critical thinking, professionalism and communication skills are applied to clinical practice. 480 hours of clinical participation is required along with weekly contributions to online discussions and review activities. Must complete with a B- or better.

RAD 2320
Clinical Applications II
6

Focuses on simple to complex radiologic procedures being observed. The application of proper communication, professionalism and student knowledge will be assessed and evaluated. This will include simple and moderately complex examinations which require critical thinking and good judgement. Individual competencies will be enhanced and evaluated. 600 hours of clinical participation is required along with weekly contributions to online discussions and review activities. There will be professional growth and development opportunities with advanced imaging technologies. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
RAD 2310

RAD 2410
Patient Care and Assessment
2

Reinforces and advances aspects of patient care encountered in radiology. Theory and practice will include such areas as infection control, history taking, vital signs, dealing with emergencies, and patient transfer methods. Emphasis on the total patient is presented with regards to the patient’s physical, psychological, social and spiritual needs. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
RAD 1150

RAD 2450
Radiologic Capstone
3

Prepares students to pass the national certification exam and mentor subsequent students in the practice of radiography. A simulated certification exam is administered as a primary candidate test for graduation. Final preparation will occur on campus during the last week of the semester. A passing score must be achieved on this test for successful completion of the course. Professional development and lifelong learning will be emphasized. 45 didactic hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RAD 2320

RAD 2510
CT Basics and Related Anatomy
3

Focuses on the introductory concepts of Computed Tomography (CT) are analyzed including functional principles, technical factors for image acquisition, and patient positioning. Sectional anatomy as observed on CT images will be identified. Must complete with a B- or better.

RAD 2610
Radiologic Pharmacology
2

Basic concepts of pharmacology are discussed. Commonly prescribed drugs are classified and examined. Drug administration with an emphasis on diagnostic contrast agents and venipuncture is explained. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RAD 2220

RDT 1010
Introduction to Radiation Therapy
3

Provides students with an overview of the foundations in radiation therapy and the practitioner's role in the health care delivery system. Principles, practices and policies of the educational program, health care organizations, radiation and health safety and professional responsibilities of the radiation therapist will be discussed and examined. This course description is from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 2110
Radiobiology
2

Presents basic concepts and principles of radiation biology. The interactions of radiation with cells, tissues and the body as a whole and resultant biophysical events will be presented. Discussion of the theories and principles of tolerance dose, time-dose relationships, fractionation schemes and the relationship to the clinical practice of radiation therapy will be discussed, examined and evaluated. This course description is derived from the ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 2210
Patient Care Management
2

Provides radiation therapy students with foundation concepts of patient care, chemotherapy protocols, agents and side effects, routine and emergency care as well as psychological aspects of the cancer patient that will confront students in the medical setting. Emphasis on the total patient is presented with regard to the patient's physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 2310
Imaging and Processing in Radiation Oncology
4

Establishes a knowledge base in factors that govern and influence the production and recording of radiographic images for patient simulation, treatment planning, and treatment verification in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology imaging equipment and related devices will be emphasized. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
RDT 2310L

RDT 2410
Sectional Anatomy
3

Introduces students to medical imaging methods currently used in the field of radiation therapy including principles related to Computed Tomography (CT). Students will identify normal anatomical structures via a variety of imaging formats. Basic anatomical relationships will be compared using topographical and cross-sectional images. This course description is derived from the ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 3110
Radiation Therapy Physics I
3

Establishes a basic knowledge of physics pertinent to developing an understanding of radiations used in the clinical setting. Fundamental physical units, measurements, principles, atomic structure and types of radiation are emphasized. Also presented are the fundamentals of x-ray generating equipment, x-ray production and its interaction with matter. This course description is derived from ASTR Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 3120
Radiation Therapy Physics II
3

Reviews and expands concepts and theories presented in Radiation Therapy Physics I. Detailed analysis of the structure of matter, properties of radiation, nuclear transformations, x-ray production and interactions of ionizing radiation are emphasized. Also presented are treatment units used in external radiation therapy, measurement and quality of ionizing radiation produced, absorbed dose measurement, dose distribution and scatter analysis. Additionally the basic principles of radiation protection and safety for the radiation therapist are reviewed along with the radiation health and safety requirements of federal and state regulatory agencies, accreditation agencies and healthcare organizations are incorporated. Specific responsibilities of the radiation therapist are discussed, examined, performed and evaluated. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 3110

RDT 3210
Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy I
4

Provides an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy. The historic and current aspects of cancer treatment will be covered. The roles and responsibilities of the radiation therapist will be discussed. In addition, treatment prescription, techniques and delivery will be covered. Examines and evaluate the management of neoplastic disease using knowledge in arts and sciences, while promoting critical thinking and the basis of ethical clinical decision making. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed and evaluated in relation to histology, anatomical site and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist’s responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the scope of the profession. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
RDT 3210L

RDT 3220
Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy II
4

Provides an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy as the second of two courses. The historic and current aspects of cancer treatment will be covered. The roles and responsibilities of the radiation therapist will be discussed. In addition, treatment prescription, techniques and delivery will be covered. Examines and evaluates the management of neoplastic disease using knowledge in arts and sciences, while promoting critical thinking and the basis of ethical clinical decision making. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed and evaluated in relation to histology, anatomical site and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist's responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the scope of the profession. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 3210

Concurrent requisite(s):
RDT 3220L

RDT 3310
Introduction to Clinical Practicum I
5

Introduces students to the various treatment machines, recordkeeping mechanisms, treatment planning processes, etc., in the clinical education center. This course is a hands-on laboratory conducted at the clinical education center(s) for 256 hours Some early morning and evening sessions may be required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 2110, RDT 2210, RDT 2310, RDT 2410

RDT 3320
Introduction to Clinical Practicum II
5

Continues students experience with the various treatment machines, recordkeeping mechanisms, treatment planning processes, etc., in the clinical education center. This course is a hands-on laboratory conducted at the clinical education center(s) for 256 hours. Some early morning or evening sessions may be required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 3310

RDT 4110
Clinical Practicum I
6

Provides hands-on opportunities at clinical education centers. This is the first in a series of three courses Students actively participate/observe simulation, treatment planning, custom block making, treatments, and patient care procedures. Students will also attend tumor and other relevant conferences to enhance their knowledge of cancer and its processes, which in turn allows them to procure the skills/competencies necessary to become a radiation therapist. All objectives are competency based. This is a 12 week course. 384 clinical experience hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 3320

RDT 4120
Clinical Practicum II
6

Provides hands-on opportunities at clinical education centers. This is the second in a series of three courses. Students actively participate/observe simulation, treatment planning, treatments, and patient care procedures. Students will also attend tumor and other relevant conferences to enhance their knowledge of cancer and its processes, which in turn allows them to procure the skills/competencies necessary to become a radiation therapist. Some early morning and evening sessions may be required. This is a 16 week course. 384 clinical experience hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 4110

RDT 4130
Clinical Practicum III
6

Provides hands-on opportunities at clinical education centers. This is the third in a series of three courses. Students actively participate/observe simulation, treatment planning, treatments, and patient care procedures. Students will also attend tumor and other relevant conferences to enhance their knowledge of cancer and its processes, which in turn allows them to procure the skills/competencies necessary to become a radiation therapist. Some early morning and evening sessions may be required. 384 clinical experience hours are required. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 4120

RDT 4210
Dosimetry
5

Provides the content designed to establish factors that influence and govern clinical planning of patient treatment. This encompasses isodose descriptions, patient contouring, radiobiologic considerations, dosimetric calculations, compensation and clinical application of treatment beams. Optimal treatment planning is emphasized along with particle beams. Stereotactic and emerging technologies are presented. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. 60 hours lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 3120

Concurrent requisite(s):
RDT 4210L

RDT 4310
Senior Seminar I
3

Provides students, in this first of two courses, with the chance to express his/her knowledge of the principles of oncology management, normal/abnormal cytology, pathology, radiation reactions, and patient care, for specific anatomical sites. Students will state the multidisciplinary modality treatments and rationale for these treatments based on the anatomical site of interest. All objectives are based on knowledge previously acquired in the radiation therapy didactic courses and clinical practicums. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009/2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

RDT 4320
Senior Seminar II
3

Provides students, in this second of two courses, the chance to express his/her knowledge of oncology management. The emphasis continues on specific case histories for which students will be required to analyze the contents of the history and define the expected treatment/outcome. As the program didactic capstone course—the second focus of this course is to demonstrate a cumulative knowledge of program content. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009/2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 4310

RDT 4410
Quality Management and Operational Issues in Radiation Therapy
3

Focuses on the components of quality improvement (QI) programs in radiation oncology. Topics will include developing a culture of safety through quality control and assurance checks for the clinical aspects of patient care, medical records, treatment delivery and localization equipment and treatment planning equipment. The role of the various radiation therapy team members in continuous quality improvement will be discussed as well as the legal and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate quality care. Additionally will cover various radiation therapy operational issues. Continuous quality improvement (CQI) project development and evaluation and assessment techniques will be emphasized. Human resource concepts and regulations impacting the radiation therapist will be examined. Accreditation agencies and the radiation therapist's role in the accreditation process will be emphasized. Billing and reimbursement issues pertinent to the radiation therapy department will be presented. The students will develop and use problem solving and critical thinking skills in discussion of the sources of law, causes of action and litigation processes related to the professional practice of radiation therapy. The inter-relatedness of standards of care, law, ethical standards and competence will be examined. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2014. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RDT 4210

RSC 2010
Equipment and Procedures I
4

Provides an introduction to respiratory care as a health care profession. Provides orientation and lecture to basic practices of respiratory care including gas laws, administration of medical gases, infection control, and essentials of equipment maintenance and sterilization; aerosol and humidity therapies included. Lab includes development of pre-clinical skills in storage and administration of medical gases, infection control, essentials of equipment maintenance and sterilization, and aerosol and humidity therapies. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2110, RSC 2210, RSC 2310

Concurrent requisite(s):
RSC 2010L

RSC 2020
Equipment and Procedures II
4

Provides continuation of lecture for procedures, techniques and equipment used in respiratory care. Topics include use of volume expansion therapy, bronchopulmonary hygiene therapy, airway care/management, and resuscitation. Protocols and documentation used in the practices of respiratory care will be emphasized. Lab includes to continue development of pre-clinical skills in basic respiratory care procedures, including volume expansion therapies, chest physiotherapy, humidity and aerosol treatments, and airway care/ management and resuscitation. ABG puncture and technique also will be emphasized. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2010

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2220, RSC 2610, RSC 2620

Concurrent requisite(s):
RSC 2020L

RSC 2030
Equipment and Procedures III
4

Introduces the study of ventilation drive mechanisms, ventilator support devices, and related physical principles. Factors leading to ventilator initiation, dependence, directed weaning protocol, assessment, monitoring and maintenance; discontinuation and documentation for adult care will be discussed. Lab includes introduction to development of pre-clinical skills, assembly, operation, clinical application, monitoring systems, and maintenance of mechanical ventilation on adults, pediatrics and infants. Clinical documentation will be practiced. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2020

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2410

Concurrent requisite(s):
RSC 2030L

RSC 2050
Pulmonary Rehabilitation and Home Care
3

Studies pulmonary rehabilitation strategies and smoking cessation and covers homecare equipment, maintenance, procedures, patient assessment, protocols, and documentation. Student will develop project pertinent to smoking cessation education for specific target groups. Research topic and presentation required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2030

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2150, RSC 2640, RSC 2790

RSC 2110
Cardiopulmonary Anatomy and Physiology
3

Applies an overview of cardiopulmonary anatomy and physiology with emphasis on fundamental concepts of the cardiopulmonary, neurological, and cardiovascular systems as related to respiratory care essentials. Acid base balance is emphasized. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2010, RSC 2210, RSC 2310

RSC 2150
Advanced Procedures
3

Focuses on advanced applications in clinical practice. Covers testing and values related to spirometry, pulmonary function, chest radiography, EKGs, chest tube drainage, hemodynamic monitoring, and bronchoscopy. Student will give an oral presentation. Computer assisted instruction included. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2410

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2050, RSC 2640, RSC 2790

RSC 2210
Acid-Base Regulation
2

Emphasized are acid-base balance and fluid and electrolytes related to renal, pulmonary, metabolic, and neurological functions. Analyze, interpret, and evaluate arterial and venous blood gases. Coverage includes ventilation, clinical oxygenation, blood gas analysis and non-invasive techniques, capnometry, ABG puncture and A-line draws are emphasized. Must complete with a B- or better.

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2010, RSC 2110, RSC 2310

RSC 2250
Cardiopulmonary Pathophysiology
3

Explores the fundamentals of respiratory care patient assessment relating to cardiopulmonary diseases. Laboratory values, radiologic assessment, pulmonary function values as related to cardiopulmonary disorders and diseases. The anatomic alteration, etiology, clinical manifestations, and patient care plan will be correlated for each disease process. Development of therapist-driven protocols is emphasized. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2110, RSC 2210

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2020

RSC 2310
Respiratory Care Pharmacology
2

Provides an emphasis of pharmacological agents and their effects on the respiratory, circulatory, and nervous systems. Pharmacological therapeutics focusing on dosage, solutions, classifications, indications, mechanism of action, side effects, hazards, and routes of administration are discussed. Must complete with a B- or better.

RSC 2410
Neonatal/Pediatric Respiratory Care
2

Introduces students to neonatal and pediatric respiratory care, fetal lung development, anatomy and physiology, neonatal development, supplemental oxygenation, pathology, CPR, and acid-base monitoring. Must complete with a B- or better.

RSC 2610
Clinical Care I
4

Provides students a supervised opportunity to work with a preceptor or clinical instructor, applying the concepts learned in the laboratory and lecture formats. Beginning therapy skills, including oxygen, aerosol and drug delivery, lung expansion therapies and other modalities, will be developed in the patient care setting. 16 contact hours per week for 8 weeks. 192 hours of clinical experience is required. Must complete with a B- or better.

RSC 2620
Clinical Care II
4

Expands on a clinical experience in mechanical ventilatory support, airway management, interpretation of laboratory and diagnostic testing, gathering data, and decision making in the critical care environment. 16 contact hours per week for 8 weeks. 192 hours of clinical experience is required. Must complete with a B- or better.

RSC 2630
Clinical Care III
5

Provides a continued clinical experience using advanced respiratory care equipment in the clinical setting with an emphasis on critical thinking skills, gathering data, and decision making relative to adult critical care, ventilatory mechanics, and airway management. 24 contact hours per week. Experience consists of 288 actual contact hours. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2620

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2030, RSC 2410

RSC 2640
Clinical Care IV
4

Provides a continued clinical experience using advanced respiratory care equipment in the clinical setting with an emphasis on critical thinking skills, gathering data, and decision making relative to adult critical care, ventilatory mechanics, and airway management. This clinical also provides students with specialty rotations, which may include PFT lab, neonatal/pediatric care, homecare, sleep studies, out-patient clinic, sub-acute care and skilled nursing facilities. 16 contact hours per week. Experience consists of 240 actual contact hours. Students must achieve 80% or better in all coursework and 80% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
RSC 2630

Corequisite(s):
RSC 2050, RSC 2150, RSC 2790

RSC 2790
Registry Review Seminar
3

Reviews public research topics on ethical and choice of life or death issues related to respiratory care. Review for the NBRC examination preparation and clinical proficiency using computer-assisted-instruction and other modalities. Resume and cover letter preparation are prepared. Students will take the NBRC self-assessment examinations, TMC and CSE (SAEs). Attendance to credentialing exam preparation seminar is required. Must complete with a B- or better.

SCI 1210
Physics Concepts
1

Introduces various topics in physics. Motion, energy, and the dynamics of particles are investigated. The physical concepts of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave motion are explored as well as selected topics in atomic and nuclear physics.

SCI 2150
Integrated Physics
3

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110, MTH 1120, MTH 1210

SCI 2460
General Chemistry
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1060 or MTH 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2460L

SCI 2510
General Physics I
4

Includes Newton’s laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1510

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2510L

SCI 2520
General Physics II
4

Includes electricity and magnetism, oscillations and waves, optics, and foundations of modern physics. This is the second calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 2510, SCI 2510, SCI 2510L

Concurrent requisite(s):
SCI 2520L

SCI 3210
Principles of Astronomy
3

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

SCI 4510
Environmental Science
3

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

SCM 3010
Procurement and Supply Chain Management
3

Reviews procurement strategies and supply chain management from many different aspects including the firm's stakeholders and the impact of procurement and supply chain management on the competitive success of the organization. The major areas covered are ethical, contractual and legal issues faced by procurement; introduction to techniques and tools for managing the procurement and sourcing process; supplier selection and relationship management, and special purchasing applications and research. Course also introduces student to simulation utilizing software currently prevalent within the industry.

Prerequisite(s):
SCM 3010, SCM 3210

SCM 3210
Manufacturing, Planning, and Control
3

Explores forecasting, production planning, master scheduling, computer-integrated manufacturing, capacity planning and demand management. Reviews past and current management styles as related to manufacturing and efficient/lien operations. Course also continues the student's use of simulation software and pertinent applications to the value chain of industry.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 2410

Corequisite(s):
MTH 2750

SCM 4010
Decision Modeling in Supply Chains
3

Reviews standard techniques commonly used within the industry in the development and use of classical inventory models. Advanced techniques utilizing optimization modeling will also be introduced. Students will use modeling to examine supply chain scenarios drawn from case studies to assist them in their ability to make better decision about sourcing, manufacturing, transportation, warehousing, customer service and inventory management. Modeling includes the use of simulation software introduced in previous courses.

Prerequisite(s):
SCM 3010, SCM 3210

SCM 4210
Advanced Topics in Supply Chain Management
3

Presents, as a capstone course, a current and future view of industry trends and direction of integrated logistics and supply chain management Oral and written discussions based on student assessment of the industry in areas such as procurement strategies, strategic outsourcing, mitigation of supply chain risks, strategic allocation of inventories, transportation and distribution issues, scheduling and sequencing issues, and customer service issues will be complemented by guest lectures, webinars etc. in order to address a wide array of current, trending and advanced topics. Simulation software combined with SCM models will be used by students to demonstrate the ability to critically evaluate a company's current value chain and through the use of experimentation prepare and present recommendations to improve the value chain. (Final assessment)

SLI 1110
American Sign Language I
3

Provides foundational knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax while introducing the student to Deaf cultural aspects. Emphasis is on comprehension. Must complete with a B- or better.

SLI 1110
American Sign Language I
3

Provides foundational knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax while introducing the student to Deaf cultural aspects. Emphasis is on comprehension. Must complete with a B- or better.

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SOC 2010
Sociology
3

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

SOC 3010
Social Problems
3

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 2010

SOC 3210
Cultural Diversity
3

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

SPK 2010
Oral Communication
3

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using organization, research, and technology to deliver effective oral presentation.

SPK 2050
Oral Interpretation of Literature
3

Analyzes works of prose, poetry, drama, and children's literature for the purpose of oral performance. Along with developing skills in the use of voice and bodily movement to expressively interpret literature, students will examine literary structures, meaning, mood, and rhythm with the purpose of adapting works for individual and collaborative performance, and students will engage in practice and peer feedback in the process of preparing for performances.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 2010

SPK 2110
Group Dynamics
3

Prepares students to work effectively in groups. Students will collaborate to complete a group project and multiple presentations. Course content covers key concepts of group dynamics such as diversity, group roles, ethical issues, and conflict resolution. Students will hone group communication skills and effectively use technology to communicate with group members.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 2010

SPK 4010
Professional Speaking
3

Prepares students to compose professional presentations using current technologies. Addresses theory and practice of communication, including research-based content development, organization of a message to achieve a desired outcome, audience and context analysis, presentation tools, and delivery methods. Consideration of diversity, ethics, and relevance to future careers are key components.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 2010

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

SPN 1020
Spanish II
3

Continues beginning Spanish designed for students who have successfully completed the introductory/previous course. This course continues to develop the student's ability to speak, read, write and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 1010

SPT 1010
Introduction to Central Services
3

Explores the job roles and responsibility of a sterile processing technician. Students will demonstrate basic job knowledge to include; medical terminology, microbiology, anatomy, principles of asepsis , infection control, departmental organization, workflow and communication essentials. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1010, SPT 1050, SPT 1110, SPT 1110L

SPT 1050
Regulations, Standards and Quality Assurance of Central Service Operation
2

Focuses on regulatory agencies and analyzing their impact on quality assurance and infection control. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1010, SPT 1010, SPT 1110, SPT 1110L

SPT 1110
Principles of Cleaning, Decontam ination, Disinfection and Surgic al Instrumentation
3

Emphasizes the identification of surgical instruments. Student will learn to determine risk levels of equipment and instruments and apply appropriate levels of disinfection/sterilization. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a C or better.

Concurrent requisite(s):
HSC 1010, SPT 1010, SPT 1050, SPT 1110L

SPT 1150
Sterile Processing, Storage and Distribution
3

Emphasizes techniques of packaging, identify appropriate mode of sterilization and principles of regulatory tracking and storage. Students will demonstrate these techniques as well. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, SPT 1010, SPT 1050, SPT 1110, SPT 1110L

Concurrent requisite(s):
SPT 1210, WRK 2270

SPT 1210
Professional Career Preparation
2

Address the written and verbal professional skills needed in the career of sterile processing. Students will demonstrate these skills. Students will prepare for International or National certification. Must complete with a C or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1010, SPT 1010, SPT 1050, SPT 1110, SPT 1110L

SUR 2010
Surgical Fundamentals
2

Defines and describe the role of the surgical technologist, surgical attire, OR environment equipment, job description, furniture of the operating room, role of team members, healthcare organization, safety, and exposure risks. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1210

SUR 2110
Surgical Asepsis I
4

Emphasizes the application of knowledge by demonstrating the principles of asepsis and sterile technique. Students will begin to identify and interpret sources of contamination. Students will identify the basic laparotomy instrumentation. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2210

SUR 2120
Surgical Asepsis II
2

Explores hemostasis, catheters, drains, dressings, and the concepts of surgical wounds, suture material, the wound healing process, tissue replacement options and how to handle surgical specimen. Students will discover and discuss technological science which includes information about technology, robotics, and electrical concepts. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010, SUR 2110, SUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

SUR 2210
Surgical Technology Lab I
2

Allows students the opportunites to apply knowledge of the principles of asepsis to lab skills. Students will learn the sterilization process and recognize breaks in both sterilization and sterile technique. Students will also begin to recognize and classify instrumentation including basic laparotomy and plastic sets. This course contains a pass/fail element that is required to move forward in the surgical technology program. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010

SUR 2220
Surgical Technology Lab II
4

Focuses on students demonstrating the principals of sterile techniques learned in SUR 2210 and building upon those skills. Students will organize surgical instrumentation, supplies, and sharps on the back table and mayo stand, with additional associated tasks while performing mock surgical procedures in the roles of the ST; Scrub role, Assistant Role, and Circulator Role. This course contains a pass/fail element that is required to move forward in the surgical technology program. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010, SUR 2110, SUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2310, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

SUR 2310
Surgical Patient
2

Explores and investigate legal ramifications, ethics, documentation, risk management, informed consent, charting and special populations. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010, SUR 2110, SUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

SUR 2350
Surgical Pharmacology and Anesthesia
2

Analyze and compare anesthesia administration/ techniques and demonstrate the components of surgical patient preparation. Students will apply medication classifications, actions, indication as well as calculate, prepare and manage medications and solutions in the sterile field. Students will also explain anesthesia complications and interventions based on patient scenarios. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010, SUR 2110, SUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2410

SUR 2410
Surgical Procedures I
4

Assesses the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and diagnostic indications while exploring surgical procedures in the following specialties; general, OB/GYN, GU, ENT, and orthopedics. Students will learn to plan for intraoperative procedures and analyze patient considerations. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2010, SUR 2110, SUR 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2350

SUR 2420
Surgical Procedures II
2

Assesses the anatomy, physiology, pathophysiology, and diagnostic indications while exploring surgical procedures in the following specialties; plastics and reconstructive, maxillofacial, PV, cardio, thoracic, ophthalmology, and neuro. Students will learn to plan for intraoperative procedures and analyze patient considerations. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2410, SUR 2350

Corequisite(s):
SUR 2420

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2510, SUR 2590

SUR 2510
Clinical I
5

Participates in a clinical externship to gain hands-on patient experience in the first scrub role as in accordance with professional accreditation requirements. Students will also be accountable for the verification and documentation associated with adequate procedural recording and hospital compliance. 256 clinical hours are required. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

Corequisite(s):
SUR 2420

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2590

SUR 2520
Clinical II
5

Participates in a clinical externship to gain hands-on patient experience in the first scrub role as in accordance with professional accreditation requirements. Students will also be accountable for the verification and documentation associated with adequate procedural recording and hospital compliance. 256 clinical hours are required. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2510, SUR 2310, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

Corequisite(s):
SUR 2420

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2590

SUR 2590
Professional Preparation
3

Evaluates all knowledge gained throughout the program to prepare and sit for the national certification exam. Upon completion of all required courses and material students should be able to have the skills and professional practices necessary to seek an entry level position as a certified surgical technologist. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
SUR 2120, SUR 2220, SUR 2310, SUR 2350, SUR 2410

Corequisite(s):
SUR 2420

Concurrent requisite(s):
SUR 2510, SUR 2520

VAS 2220
Non-Invasive Vascular I
3

Presents sonography anatomy of the normal and abnormal cerebrovascular, and peripheral venous system. Normal variants, signs, symptoms, risk factors, pathology, and treatments of these areas are also covered. Emphasis will be on the basic understanding of various testing modalities, techniques, limitations, and interpretative guidelines used in noninvasive peripheral vascular evaluations. Presents basic principles of ultrasound physics, analyzing diagnostic criteria in flow dynamics. Must complete with a B- or better.

VAS 2320
Non-invasive Vascular II
3

Presents sonography anatomy of the normal and abnormal peripheral arterial, and visceral vascular anatomy. Normal variants, signs, symptoms, risk factors, pathology and treatments of these areas are also covered. Discover physiologic testing, and the importance of proper techniques used, the limitations, and interpretative guidelines used in these vascular evaluations. Covers advanced diagnostic testing, and the techniques utilized in the evaluation of the vascular system. A mock registry for vascular technology will be presented, incorporating major concepts. Must complete with a B- or better.

Prerequisite(s):
VAS 2220

VET 1010
Anatomy and Physiology for Veterinary Technology
5

Provides an overview of the anatomy and physiology of domestic animals commonly encountered in veterinary medicine. Emphasis will be placed on the parts and function of the systems of the animal body and associated medical terminology. Must complete with a B- or better to be eligible for acceptance in the Professional Track. 60 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 1010L

VET 1050
Fundamentals of Veterinary Technology
4

Introduces students to the veterinary technology profession. Emphasis is placed on regulatory and ethical issues, handling, restraint, and behavior of animals, sanitation, husbandry, and nutrition. This course will also encompass medical terminology, pharmacology, and breed identification. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
HSC 2410, VET 1110, VET 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 1050L

VET 1110
Laboratory and Exotic Animal Procedures and Nursing
2

Provides an overview of the study of exotic animals and animals used in research. Emphasis is placed on the selection and procurement of animals, safety and health considerations, legal regulations, and policies on the care and use of laboratory animals, husbandry, care, and importance of environment. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 22.5 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
HSC 2410, VET 1050, VET 1210

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 1110L

VET 1210
Large Animal Procedures and Nursing
2

Presents nursing procedures on large animals to be performed in clinical, laboratory, or farm settings. Emphasis is placed on preparation and assisting of the physical exam, administering medications including injections, venipuncture, catheterization, collection of laboratory specimens, bandaging techniques, and care of the critical patient. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 22.5 hours of lecture and 15 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
HSC 2410, VET 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 1210L

VET 2010
Veterinary Diagnostic Imaging
3

Prepares students to safely and effectively produce diagnostic radiographic and non-radiographic images. Emphasis will be placed on decision-making abilities such as determining diagnostic quality, exercising professional judgment to minimize personnel radiation exposure, understanding the proper anatomical landmarks for positioning patients for diagnostic images, and equipment maintenance. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 30 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 2410, VET 1050, VET 1110, VET 1210

Corequisite(s):
VET 2050

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 2010L

VET 2050
Veterinary Pathology
4

Presents a study of veterinary diseases and zoonoses. Emphasis is placed on identification and classification of diseases, diagnosis, methods of transmission, prevention of disease, and treatment modalities. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 60 hours of lecture are required.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 2410, VET 1050, VET 1110, VET 1210

Corequisite(s):
VET 2010

VET 2110
Veterinary Diagnostic Laboratory Procedures
5

Provides a comprehensive study in the principles and procedures for the veterinary practice laboratory. Emphasis is placed on microscopy, interpretation of microscopic observations, laboratory safety, quality control principles and practices, and technical skills in hematology, cytology, clinical chemistry, serology, parasitology, urinalysis, microbiology, and prosection. 52.5 hours of lecture and 45 hours of lab are required. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2010, VET 2050

Corequisite(s):
VET 2150, VET 2210

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 2110L

VET 2150
Veterinary Pharmacology
5

Provides further study in the area of veterinary drugs and medicines. Emphasis is placed on classification of drugs and medicines, calculating dosages, administering and dispensing drugs and medicines, legal issues, and recordkeeping. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 75 hours of lecture are required.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2010, VET 2050

Corequisite(s):
VET 2110, VET 2210

VET 2210
Introduction to Veterinary Surgical Procedures and Nursing
5

Provides an orientation to nursing care and surgical procedures in the veterinary practice. Emphasis is placed on the care of the patient and equipment, preparation and assisting of the physical exam, and examination room procedures. Students will also be introduced to concepts including pharmacology for animals, venipuncture, catheterization, collection of laboratory specimens, bandaging techniques, care of the critical patient and surgical procedures including anesthesia. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 45 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2010, VET 2050

Corequisite(s):
VET 2110, VET 2150

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 2210L

VET 2310
Advanced Veterinary Surgical Procedures and Nursing
6

Provides advanced study and practice in surgical assisting, postoperative care, anesthesiology, and dentistry. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. 45 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2110, VET 2150, VET 2210

Corequisite(s):
VET 2410, VET 2510

Concurrent requisite(s):
VET 2310L

VET 2410
Veterinary Technology Capstone/Board Review
2

Emphasizes the preparation of students for the licensing exam. This class is taken along with the Veterinary Technician Externship course. Must complete with a B- or better to satisfactorily complete this course. This is a capstone course.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2110, VET 2150, VET 2210

VET 2510
Veterinary Technology Internship
4

Requires students to complete a minimum of 240 hours of unpaid work experience in a veterinary facility under the supervision of a veterinarian. Students will perform administrative and clinical duties that may include but are not limited to: admission and preparation of animals for a veterinary examination, record keeping, administration of medications, performance of routine laboratory procedures, performance of radiologic testing, assisting in surgery, and the maintenance of anesthesia. This occupation-based instruction will be implemented through the use of written individualized training plans, written performance evaluations, and required on-the-job training. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
VET 2110, VET 2150, VET 2210

Corequisite(s):
VET 2310, VET 2410

WEB 1110
Introduction to HTML
3

Introduces concepts in website development using Hypertext Mark-up Language (HTML) and other components such as Cascading Style Sheets (CSS) and Javascript. Topics will include: evolution of web development, website design concepts, standard HTML techniques, and trends in the field of web Development.

WEB 1210
World Wide Web Design
3

Instructs students in the creation of a website and in the use of web page development tools. Students apply their skills in the creation of web pages using text, graphics, tables, and frames. This course will enable students to create their own web pages and websites for publishing information on the Internet. Emphasis on effective design and layout of web pages and sites is provided.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1010 or WEB 1110

WEB 1310
Web Development I
3

Provides a foundation in website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare Web-based solutions through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current methodology including CSS and HTML5.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 1110

WEB 1320
Web Development II
3

Provides professional level website development through practice and hands-on activities. Students prepare professional level Web-based solutions for multiple Internet capable devices through thoughtful, structured design with a focus on content structure as well as presentation. Web pages are developed using current enhanced methodology including JavaScript and jQuery.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 1310

WEB 2110
Web Scripting
3

Focuses on the skills in utilizing Java-script and HTML. Enables students to integrate Java-script and HTML to create interactive websites that include pop-up windows, pop-up menus, and image rollovers. This course includes working with forms, images, frames, windows and cookies.

Prerequisite(s):
CIS 1110, WEB 1110

WEB 2210
Interactive Web Design
3

Enables students to develop interactive web applications. Students will install and modify scripts as part of site development projects. The course also includes web-database integration.

Prerequisite(s):
WEB 2110

WELD 1010
Welding Principles
3

Presents an overview of the welding profession with a focus on basic blueprint reading, basic electrical principles, safety procedures, equipment, and applied mathematics used in welding applications. Provides students with the ability to identify various testing techniques for spotting weld defects, explains destructive testing, nondestructive testing, explains the positions needed for various pipe cutting and welding situations. 45 hours of lecture.

WELD 1110
Cutting and Oxy-fuel Welding
4

Provides students with the opportunity to safely use equipment to perform Oxy-Acetylene Welding and Cutting (OAW) (OFC-A), and Plasma Arc Cutting (PAC) to cut metal and produce quality welds. Identify various joint fit-ups used in welding pipe and demonstrate various uses of pipe welding/cutting with PAC, OFC-A, with 1G, 2G, 5G, 6G positions. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 1110L

WELD 1160
Gas Metal Arc Welding
4

Provides students with the opportunity to safely use equipment to perform Gas Metal Arc Welding (GMAW/MIG), and Flux Cored Arc Welding (FCAW) to produce quality welds. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 1160L

WELD 1210
Gas Tungsten Arc Welding
4

Provides students with the opportunity to safely use equipment to perform Gas Tungsten Arc Welding (GTAW) to produce quality welds. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 1210L

WELD 1260
Shielded Metal Arc Welding
4

Provides students with the opportunity to safely use equipment to perform Shielded Metal Arc Welding (SMAW) to produce quality welds. Demonstrate various uses of structural steel and pipe welding in 1G, 2G, 5G, and 6G positions. 15 hours of lecture and 90 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 1260

WELD 1310
Metallurgy
3

Provides students with a better understanding of the effects of alloying elements on the welding process. Students will gain knowledge of the physical and chemical behavior of metal under various welding conditions. Weld testing methods will be studied as well as specialty welding processes that are used within the welding industry today. Demonstrate lab techniques for mechanical properties understanding with various destructive testing with material science harness testing styles. 30 hours lecture and 15 hours of lab are required.

WELD 2110
Advanced Welding and Cutting Processes
3

Examines specialty welding processes and techniques including pipe welding and thermal cutting as well as issues of sustainability and other environmental aspects. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 2110L

WELD 2210
Welding Fabrication Practicum I
3

Introduces techniques in welding fabrication presenting an opportunity for students to create metal structures from design documents and specifications along with jigs, fixtures, rigging techniques that will be covered. 15 hours of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

WELD 2220
Welding Fabrication Practicum II
3

Continues the practical approach to fabrication in the introductory/previous course. Students will fabricate increasingly complex structures while considering costs, materials, and labor in the overall process. Final evaluation project (30 hours) will be listed as the capstone project. 15 of lecture and 60 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
WELD 1010, WELD 1110, WELD 1160, WELD 1210, WELD 1260

Concurrent requisite(s):
WELD 2220L

WELD 2960
Welding Certification I and II SMAW and GMAW Processes
2

Provides, within the first 30 hours of the 60 hour lab, students the opportunity to pass a Welder Qualification test in accordance to the AWS standards for SMAW (Shielded Metal Arc Welding) D1.1 structural welding code with 3/8 plate mild steel in a 3-G 22.5 degree beveled material to conformed criteria to a bend test pass or fail outcome. The second 15 hours of the 30 hour lab will be to comply to the same parameters but with the GMAW (Gas metal Arc Welding) process. 60 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

WELD 2970
Welding Certification III and IV FCAW and GTAW Processes
1

Provides, within the first 15 hours of the 30 hour lab, students the opportunity to pass a Welder Qualification test in accordance to the AWS standards for FCAW (Flux Core Arc Welding) D1.1 structural welding code with 3/8 plate mild steel in a 3-G 22.5 degree beveled material to conformed criteria to a bend test pass or fail outcome. The second 15 hours of the 30 hour lab will be to comply to the D1.2 Structural welding code / Aluminum parameters but with the GTAW (Gas Tungsten Arc Welding) process. 30 hours of lab are required.

Corequisite(s):
WELD 1010

WRI 1150
Workplace Communication
3

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

WRI 3010
Report Writing
3

Addresses the ability to write professionally and ethically for business and technical purposes relevant to a student's major field or career aspirations. Emphasis is on learning and applying rhetorical principles for writing formal reports including researching published technical information. Less formal aspects of business and technical communication are also studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1010

WRK 2150
Paralegal Work Experience
3

Requires students, in this capstone field experience, to perform 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experiences in a legal setting. General paralegal duties will be performed.

WRK 2270
Sterile Processing Technician Externship
2

Provides supervised work experience to enable students to apply the skills acquired in the program in a clinical setting. Students will actively participate in the process of decontamination, sterilization, and distribution of sterile instruments and supplies. Requires students to perform 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experience. Students must achieve 73% or better in all coursework and 73% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

Prerequisite(s):
SPT 1010, SPT 1050, SPT 1110

Concurrent requisite(s):
SPT 1150, SPT 1210

WRK 3010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 160-hour bachelor's level, learning experience in a technical environment structured to allow students to further develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students must achieve 70% or better in all coursework and 70% or better on all evaluations to receive credit for this course.

WRK 4410
Healthcare Administration Externship
3

Provides a minimum of 121 hours to a maximum of 180 hours of paid/unpaid experience in a health or health related setting. The primary focus is to provide an opportunity for students to develop/experience activities of planning, directing, coordinating, budget related activities. Students may be required to undergo a criminal background check, drug screening, and provide proof of current immunizations, dependent on the requirements of the externship placement facility.

Prerequisite(s):
HSC 1110, HSC 3110, HSC 3150, HSC 4010, HSC 4210, HSC 4310

Corequisite(s):
HSC 4110

WRK 4950
Accounting Work Experience
3

Requires students to perform a minimum of 120 hours of paid/unpaid, hands-on and supervised work experience in the accounting field. Students may secure work experiences with a CPA firm, within the accounting department of various local businesses (private or public sector), or with accounting services or tax preparation organizations as well as with other approved sites.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 3010

WRKAT2010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 120-hour minimum, paid/unpaid, learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students pursuing an Associates Degree or Certificate to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students can begin work experience with 80% of coursework completed or administrative approval.

WRKAT2050
Work Experience
2

Provides students with a 60-hour minimum up to a 120-hour maximum, paid/unpaid, learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students persuing a Certificate or an Associates Degree to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Students can begine work experience with 80% of coursework completed or administrative approval.

WRKBS2010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 120-hour learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Program completion based on Associate or Bachelor requirements may vary between programs. There may be certain course requirements that require completion prior to enrolling in the work experience course. *Note: Students in the BBA would take this as their first required work experience.

Prerequisite(s):
MGT 1010

WRKBS4010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 120-hour learning experience in an appropriate work environment structured to allow students to develop skills and gain training in their major field. Program completion based on Associate or Bachelor requirements may vary between programs. There may be certain course requirements that require completion prior to enrolling in the work experience course. *Note: Students in the BBA would take this course as their 2nd required work experience.

Prerequisite(s):
WRKBS2010

WRKCM2010
Work Experience
3

Requires students to perform 200 hours (25 hours per week over 8 weeks) of supervised work experience in an approved facility. Students will participate in weekly seminars through Blackboard.

Prerequisite(s):
CUL 1310

WRKIT2010
Work Experience
3

Provides a 150-hour minimum learning experience over a minimum of 10 week in an