The Michigan Transfer Agreement (MTA) is designed to facilitate the transfer of general education requirements. Students can view a list of participating institutions at macrao.org.

The MTA requirements should fulfill all or the majority of the student’s lower-level general education credits, depending on the requirements of the student’s major. A transfer students must be admissible to a receiving institution in order to benefit from the MTA. Students may meet requirements of the MTA as a stand-alone package.

To fulfill the Michigan Transfer Agreement, students must successfully complete at least 30 semester hours (or 46 quarter credit hours) with at least a 2.0 GPA in each course. These credits, which will be certified by a Michigan college, should be met according to the following distribution.

Semester Credit Requirements

  • One course in English Composition
  • A second course in English Composition OR one course in Communication
  • One course in Mathematics from one of three pathways: College Algebra, Statistics, or Quantitative Reasoning
  • Two courses in Social Science (from two disciplines)
  • Two courses in Humanities and Fine Arts (from two disciplines, excluding studio and performance classes)
  • Two courses in Natural Sciences, including one with laboratory experience (from two disciplines)

Select 1 Course from the Following:

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
MTH 1060
Quantitative Reasoning II
3

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, regression, voting methods, and graph theory. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines. MTH 1060 – Quantitative Reasoning II satisfies the MTA Quantitative Reasoning Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050

MTH 1120
College Algebra II
3

Examines more advanced elements of algebra emphasizing the use of algebra and functions in problem solving and modeling. Key topics include functions, inverse functions, complex numbers, rational functions, logarithms, exponential functions, conic sections, sequences and series. Graphing is by recognition and transformation rather than by plotting points. MTH 1120 – College Algebra II satisfies the MTA College Algebra Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1110

MTH 2750
Statistical Methods
3

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics (bivariate), and regression analysis. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results. MTH 2750 - Statistical Methods satisfies the MTA Statistics Pathway.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1050 OR MTH 1110

Select 2 Social Science Courses (from two different disciplines - only one ECN allowed):

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ECN 2010
Principles of Macroeconomics
3

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

ECN 2110
Principles of Microeconomics
3

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

POL 3010
American Political Systems
3

Provides a brief introduction to the political science discipline, and then examines United States government and politics at the national, state, and local levels. Areas of study include the United States Constitution, federalism, representation and participation, the executive, the legislature, the judiciary and civil liberties, domestic and foreign policies, and government and politics in Michigan.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

PSY 1110
General Psychology
3

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

SOC 2010
Sociology
3

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Select 2 Humanities and Fine Arts Courses (from two different disciplines):

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
ENG 2310
Language and Culture
3

Analyzes the English language through history, considering regional variations and dialect acquisition. Students learn to appreciate language by studying language in everyday social interactions in their own lives and communities. The relationship of linguistic variation to social and cultural identity is discussed, along with multilingualism, expressive speech, sociopolitical uses of language, censorship, and language learning and preservation.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

HUM 1010
Art and Architecture I (Antiquity to Renaissance)
3

Enhances the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and the artists from each movement from the prehistoric period through the Renaissance are studied.

HUM 1020
Art and Architecture II (Renaissance to Modern)
3

Cultivates the student's appreciation and enjoyment of art. Time periods, geographical centers, cultural and societal influences, stylistic characteristics of major art movements, and artists from each movement from the Renaissance period to the present are studied.

HUM 3610
Art Appreciation
3

Fosters an appreciation of the visual arts by learning about basic art concepts, styles, vocabulary, and art-making techniques and materials (media). Students study and analyze works of art, major artists, artistic meanings, and the cultural and global communities in which the art is created.

HUM 3650
Music Appreciation
3

Provides students with a greater understanding of the role music plays in human life. Students gain general knowledge of the history of music. Students are provided with opportunities to develop an appreciation of music of various genres.

HUM 4010
Philosophy of Ethics
3

Identifies and analyzes ethical situations in modern society. Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 1020

SPN 1010
Spanish I
3

Introduces the beginning study of Spanish designed for students with minimal or no experience in Spanish. The main goal of this course is to begin to learn to speak, read, write, and comprehend Spanish. Special emphasis is placed on developing communication skills and on increasing awareness of cultures in the Spanish-speaking world.

Select 2 Natural Science Courses (from two different disciplines):

COURSE NUMBER
COURSE TITLE
CREDIT HOURS
HSC 1210/1211
Human Anatomy and Physiology/Lab
4

Focuses on the essential study of the body and associated terminology with a view toward the structure and function of the body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

HSC 2410/2411
Microbiology/Lab
4

Explores basic concepts of prokaryotic and eukaryotic microorganisms including the basic composition, metabolism, genetics, immunology, and epidemiology of microorganisms. The human diseases caused by these microorganisms in addition to their treatments will be presented. A laboratory may be taken concurrently with the lecture course; students will perform several experiments to reinforce the material presented in lecture. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab if required.

SCI 2150
Integrated Physics
3

Introduces the principles of physics. Concepts explored include mechanical, fluid, electromagnetic, and thermal systems.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 1210 OR MTH 1310

SCI 2460/L
General Chemistry/Lab
4

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Also introduced are molecular structures, chemical equilibrium, the chemistry of solutions and solubility, reduction and oxidation reactions, as well as, acids and bases. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

SCI 2510/L
General Physics I/Lab
4

Includes Newton’s laws, conservation laws, applications of Newtonian mechanics, and thermodynamics. This is the first calculus-based general physics course for science and engineering majors. 45 hours of lecture and 30 hours of lab are required.

SCI 3210
Principles of Astronomy
3

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

If these courses do not add up to 30 hours then the student must take an additional course from one of these groups.

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