Learn from the experts.

Prepare to begin a rewarding career.

Paralegals assist lawyers in their casework by doing many of the tasks that lawyers typically perform. Paralegals conduct research, draft legal documents, meet with clients, prepare for trials, assist in court, and stay on top of changing laws and trends—all under the direction of a lawyer.  It’s intellectually challenging work that demands high-level skills and innovative thinking.

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New Career

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

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Michele Favoretto
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Right after graduation I had a ton of confidence because I had this degree behind me.

Michele Favoretto
Legal Studies Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Legal StudiesBachelor of Science

Learn from the experts.

Prepare to begin a rewarding career.

Paralegals assist lawyers in their casework by doing many of the tasks that lawyers typically perform. Paralegals conduct research, draft legal documents, meet with clients, prepare for trials, assist in court, and stay on top of changing laws and trends—all under the direction of a lawyer.  It’s intellectually challenging work that demands high-level skills and innovative thinking.

Discover Your Future Legal Studies Career

Career Facts

$46,990

Median salary for Paralegals and Legal Assistants

17%

Estimated increase by 2022 for Paralegals and Legal Assistants

$70,606

Median salary for Paralegal Supervisors

View citations
Overview

The Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies program at Baker College prepares you with a well-rounded education and the practical skills required to assist a lawyer. In a curriculum developed and taught by lawyers and paralegals, you learn all the essentials—how to draft legal documents, work with clients, assist in court, research and prepare memoranda, respond to interrogatories, interview witnesses, and more.

When you graduate, you’ll be thoroughly trained in everything that’s required for employment in a legal office, whether you choose to work for a private law firm, corporation, government agency, or other organization.

As a paralegal, you are qualified by education, training, or work experience to be employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency, or other entity. You carry out specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible. You cannot provide legal services directly to the public except as permitted by law.

Course Information
Legal Studies Major109 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ACC 121
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of financial accounting, including the completion of the accounting cycle, preparation of the financial statements, and detailed coverage of cash, receivables, inventory, fixed assets and liabilities.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 091 or satisfies developmental math or placement exam.
Corequisite(s):
INF 113.
Fundamentals of Accounting I4
MGT 141
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an understanding of leadership styles, the management process, organizational resources and how to use them, various motivation/behavior theories, conflict management, and implementing and supporting change. Students will compare different leadership styles and apply them in case scenarios, role plays and other group/team activities involving topics such as: change, employee behavior, conflict, ethics, decision-making, and managing resources.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101, MGT 101.
Principles of Management4
PAR 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a basic understanding of the procedural and practical aspects of being a paralegal. Emphasis is on legal terminology, legal concepts, skills needed to perform paralegal tasks, and the ethical considerations involved.

Law, Legal Profession, and Terminology4
PAR 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with a general understanding of the nature of legal research including book research and legal citation forms using specific techniques and methodologies. Students will develop research strategies that will enable them to begin drafting and analyzing a variety of legal documents. The mechanics of the construction of documents will be examined. Must complete this course with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101 or acceptable English essay or placement exam.
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis I4
PAR 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Consists of advanced legal drafting and writing. Students will continue to review and analyze case law and legal materials in the preparation of writing court briefs, pleadings, and memorandums. Unique problems of legal research will be explored. Students will be introduced to online legal research tools. Must complete this course with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 111.
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis II4
PAR 113A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a capstone experience for the legal research and writing series in the paralegal program. This course will reinforce and continue to develop the high level research skills necessary for today's paralegals. Manual and CALR methods will be expounded upon for further skill refinement, written and oral communications will continue to be a focus as students demonstrate their proficiency in this area through an extensive legal research project that requires them to produce the applicable legal documentation and then present their findings as they would in the legal setting. Must complete this course with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 112.
Legal Writing, Research, and Analysis III4
PAR 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces basic legal software and computer technology utilized in an office. Topics include billing, time slips, electronic filing, calendaring and the ethical implications of each.

Prerequisite(s):
INF 112.
Law Office Technology and Ethics4
PAR 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to tort law, including intentional torts such as assault and battery; torts based on the failure to use reasonable care such as negligence; and strict liability torts, which make the actor liable without any fault for dangerous activities such as mining and blasting operations. In the introduction of negligence, students will become familiar with the four elements of all negligence lawsuits, duty, breach of duty, proximate causation, and damages. Major areas of tort litigation will be examined including products liability.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Torts4
PAR 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the various offenses that constitute a crime as well as the general principles of culpability and justification. Constitutional safeguards and procedures necessary from arrest through the trial, sentencing, and punishment will be examined. The First, Fourth, Fifth, Sixth, and Eighth Amendments will be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Criminal Law and Procedures4
PAR 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the different forms of business organizations, including the advantages and disadvantages of doing business as a sole proprietorship, partnership, corporation or limited liability corporation. The rights, duties, and powers of partners will be explored and how a partnership can be terminated will be examined. Students will learn the basic characteristics of a corporate entity, the processes to form a corporation, the effects of improper incorporation, dissolution of a corporation, and the differences between stocks and bonds. The duties of corporate directors and officers, and the rights and liabilities of shareholders are explained. Students will become familiar with limited liability companies and how they operate.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Business Organizations4
PAR 231A
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4 Quarter Hours

Familiarizes students with the basic elements of a will, types of wills as well as the responsibilities of a personal representative. Classes of trusts and rules governing trusts will be examined. Discussion will include the purposes of estate planning, probate forms and procedures, and guardianships. Students will assess and analyze tax ramifications of estate plans as well as the different classifications of property.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Wills, Trust, and Probate Administration4
PAR 241
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the fundamental principles and practices associated with contract law. Topics include the elements of a binding legal contract, such as the offer, acceptance, and consideration, the distinction between the common law of contracts and the Uniform Commercial Code (UCC) treatment of contracts, the study of sales transactions and commercial contracts, an analysis of the concept of performance and the legal remedies available for breach of contract, and the preparation of valid contractual agreements.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Contract Law4
PAR 291
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the stages of a lawsuit, including pretrial, trial, and post-trial procedures. Preparation of pleadings, motions, and subpoenas will be examined. This course will familiarize students with the fundamentals of discovery including interviewing techniques and case investigations. The Michigan Court Rules will also be examined. Must complete this course with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101, PAR 113A, PAR 201.
Civil Litigation4
PAR 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the areas of law related to marriage, divorce, separation, annulment, guardianship, and adoption. Topics discussed may include custody, child support, alimony, property distribution, and domestic partnerships, as well as the role of the attorney and paralegal in interviewing, determining jurisdiction, counseling, investigating, drafting, serving and filing of legal papers.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Family Law4
PAR 341
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the legal issues facing our aging population. Topics covered may include estate planning, health and personal care planning, advance directives, financial powers of attorney, availability of benefits including Social Security, Supplemental Security Income, Veterans, Medicare and Medicaid, alternative housing arrangements such as assisted living facilities and nursing homes, elder abuse and neglect, and ethical issues inherent in the area of elder law.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101, PAR 231A.
Elder Law4
PAR 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Exposes students to the practical side of real property transactions, emphasizing the residential process. Students will learn about preparing and recording documents for transfer of title, including purchase and sale agreements, mortgages and deeds, financing, the closing process, and landlord-tenant relationships.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Property and Real Estate Law4
PAR 361
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the laws that deal with the employment relationship, such as hiring and firing, wages and benefits, hours and overtime, and working conditions. Topics covered may include the various types of discrimination, federal wage and hours regulation, the concept of at-will employment, labor law, privacy laws, harassment in the workplace, workplace injuries and remedies, and employee handbooks.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Employment and Labor Law4
PAR 371
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces and familiarizes students with the legal issues, rights and remedies involving debtors and creditors. Topics covered may include Chapter 7 bankruptcy liquidation, Chapter 11 bankruptcy reorganization, and Chapter 13 wage-earner plans, as well as the areas of receivership, garnishments, secured creditors, and liens.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Debtor/Creditor Law (Bankruptcy)4
PAR 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of administrative law, namely those rules and regulations set forth by agencies of government whether at the state, local or federal level. We will address the function of administrative agencies, as well as how these agencies operate. Topics may include rule-making, constitutional and statutory limitations on agency operation, and specific administrative policies. The course will also discuss the role of the paralegal and the possibility of paralegal representation during administrative hearings.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Administrative Law4
PAR 431
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with practical application of specialized legal software and computer technology in the legal setting. Topics may include a discussion of technology and software options for time management, billing, calendaring and docketing, document management, word processing, legal research, litigation support, and specialty areas of law. Electronic filing and discovery, as well as the paperless office, will also be examined.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101, PAR 113A, PAR 131A.
Legal Technology and Software4
PAR 491
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of general evidentiary principles and application in the trial process. Topics may include relevancy of evidence, judicial notice, presumptions, weight and sufficiency of evidence, burden of proof, competency of witnesses, objections to evidence, admissibility, and rules relating to examination and cross-examination of witnesses, including the concept of hearsay and its exceptions. This course will also discuss the role of the paralegal in the litigation process and emphasize the skills necessary for a litigation paralegal. Must complete this course with a C (73%) or better.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 291.
Evidence (Litigation II)4
POL 201A
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the functions of government at the national, state, and local levels. Particular emphasis is placed on the effects of government policies on individuals and businesses. The areas of study include the Constitution, federalism, interest groups, courts, the bureaucracy, the economy, congress, the Presidency, and political parties.

American Political Systems4
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
WRK 215
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4 Quarter Hours

Requires students to perform 120 hours of paid/unpaid work experience in a legal setting. General paralegal duties will be performed.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, PAR 101, PAR 113A, PAR 131A, minimum GPA 2.00, Sophomore status, Program Director/Dean approval.
Paralegal Work Experience4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
Select 2 Courses from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
PAR 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the current issues in healthcare and insurance law. Topics may include malpractice by physicians and hospitals, tort reform and its impact on the health system, a discussion of insurance coverage, including private health insurance policies, Medicare, Medicaid, disability, long-term care and no-fault insurance, issues relating to access to healthcare as well as access to records, HIPAA and confidentiality of patient information, and advance directives.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101, PAR 201.
Healthcare and Insurance Law4
PAR 345
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of Alternative Dispute Resolution (ADR) as an alternative to traditional litigation. The basic methods of ADR, including binding as well as non-binding arbitration, mediation and negotiation, will be discussed. Students will learn the main areas where disputes often arise, how one or more methods of ADR apply, and how to determine the most appropriate method for resolving a matter. Topics covered may include the various forms of ADR, the application of ADR to specific disputes in various areas of the law, sources of ADR services, and the role of the paralegal in ADR.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Alternative Dispute Resolution4
PAR 435
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of the structure of immigration law, practice and procedure. Students will learn how to recognize the legal issues, prepare petitions and applications, and learn when, why, and where filings should be made. Students will gain a basic understanding of the history of immigration law, as well as the general procedures, terminology, and agencies that are involved in this area of law. Topics may include completing standard immigration forms, researching immigration law, and accessing government and other online materials relating to this field.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101, PAR 113A.
Immigration Law4
PAR 445
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4 Quarter Hours

Covers the field of intellectual property law, including the areas of copyrights, trademarks, trade secrets and patents. Students will gain a basic background in intellectual property law and will be introduced to the skills that are required of an intellectual property paralegal. Topics may include ownership of works, the fair use doctrine, registration of copyrights, trademarks and patents, infringement of rights, trade secrets, and use of online research tools in the area of intellectual property.

Prerequisite(s):
PAR 101.
Intellectual Property Law4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ACC 122
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of managerial accounting, including financial statement analysis, job order costing, budgeting, cost-volume-profit analysis, and use of other managerial decision-making tools.

Prerequisite(s):
ACC 121, INF 113.
Fundamentals of Accounting II4
ECN 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics4
ECN 202
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Microeconomics4
ITP 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides basic knowledge of American Sign Language (ASL) vocabulary, grammar, and syntax. Begins the exploration of Deaf culture and the language of that culture. Emphasis is on comprehension and production skills. Must complete with a C (73%) or higher.

American Sign Language I4
MED 103
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology4
General Education Requirements72 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Philosophy of Ethics4
INF 112
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Word Processing2
INF 113
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 114A
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Introduction to Database Applications2
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
Select 2 Courses from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis4
ENG 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Language and Culture4
ENG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands students' writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Creative Writing4
ENG 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies theory of behavior in communication in general and in mass media in particular. This course also focuses on the design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communication with an emphasis on the effects that various media have on consumers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Foundations of Mass Communication4
LIT 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies contemporary authors who may be classified as modern or postmodern; figures include principal ethnic and minority writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Contemporary Literature4
LIT 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from colonial times (1600) through the Civil War (1865). American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature I4
LIT 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from Reconstruction (1865) to the present. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature II4
LIT 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces selections from major English authors. Emphasis is on the writers' ideas, relationship to culture, and forms of expression.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, ENG 221.
Survey of English Literature4
LIT 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the advanced study of world literature. Topics covered vary and include all types of literature such as poetry, novels, and short stories.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102, ENG 221.
Studies in Literature4
Select 2 Courses from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
GEO 101B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Europe, Russia, and the Americas. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and national environment are studied, along with historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography I4
GEO 102B
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines world regional geography, with special attention given to Africa, the Middle East, and Asia. The concepts of regionalism, culture, and natural environment are studied, along with the historical, political, and economic forces that shape people's lives.

World Geography II4
GER 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Course Description Not Available

Conversational German I4
HIS 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the experiences of women in America and provides an overview of the present and historic influences on contemporary women in social, political, and economic roles.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Women's Studies4
HIS 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates ancient times, including Eastern, Near Eastern, Western (Greece and the Roman Republic and Empire), and African Civilizations.

Ancient World4
HIS 331A
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4 Quarter Hours

Investigates European politics, religion, and ideas from the Fall of Rome to the Napoleonic Wars, with emphasis on the barbarian kingdoms, the Reformation, religious and dynastic wars, scientific revolution, absolute monarchies, the Enlightenment, and the French Revolution.

European History I4
HIS 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the development of modern Europe from the Age of Reaction through World War II. A major focus is on the ascendancy of Europe to its dominant stance on the world stage and the effects of European political, economic, and societal impulses on other regions of the world.

European History II4
HIS 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the patterns of political, social, religious, and economic development of emerging nations in Asia, Africa, and Latin America with reference to theoretical perspectives such as globalization.

Emerging Nations4
HIS 421
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the relationship of world powers with developing nations of the world from 1945 to the present. A major focus is on development of global awareness and understanding of economic policies, political development, and social issues in the world.

World History Since 19454
POL 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Includes the study of international relations theory, development, and communications as well as American and comparative foreign policy analysis, international law, comparative politics, and peace studies, including conflict resolution and arms control.

International Relations4
SPN 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the basics of Spanish grammar, syntax, and communication. This course focuses on written and oral comprehension, spoken communication, and cultural understanding. Students are encouraged to communicate through a variety of practices with frequently used structures in everyday situations. Grammatical structures addressed include conjugation of regular and irregular verbs; basics of correct pronunciation, agreement and placement of adjectives, nouns, and articles; and the formation of questions. Primary vocabulary areas covered include numbers, colors, classes, greetings, weather, and dates.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam.
Spanish I4
SPN 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines major grammatical topics including noun-adjective agreement, reflexive and stem-changing verbs, the present progressive construction, and the past tense. Vocabulary topics include personal care, health, clothing, the home, and travel. Cultural reading is presented to increase comprehension, and class participation is expected.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 101 or 1 year high school Spanish.
Spanish II4
SPN 103
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on helping students become proficient in the Spanish commonly used in the workplace and in the community. Students learn job-specific vocabulary and grammar concepts useful to their careers. Students complete projects in Spanish such as conducting interviews, writing professional correspondence, navigating the Internet, and making presentations. Students learn to narrate using present, past, imperfect, future, and conditional verb tenses.

Prerequisite(s):
SPN 102 or 2 years high school Spanish.
Spanish III4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
Select 2 Courses from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
PSY 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
PSY 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines changes that occur across the human life span, from conception to old age and death. Topics include physical, perceptual, cognitive, personality, social, and emotional changes.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Developmental Psychology4
PSY 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores selection, placement, and evaluation of personnel, work motivation, leadership, worker well-being, group organization, and processes in the workplace.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Organizational Psychology4
PSY 335
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes the anatomical, psychological, cultural, and social aspects of a wide range of topics in the area of human sexuality. Course emphasis is on developing understanding and appreciation of variations of sexual expression and the role of sexuality throughout the various phases of the life cycle.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Human Sexuality4
PSY 351
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies the nature of adolescent behavior and its underlying dynamics. This course focuses on the understanding adolescents in our society. The emphasis is on behavior development in establishing skills necessary to work with this group. This includes physical, emotional, social, and intellectual growth of adolescents.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 111.
Adolescent Psychology4
PSY 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents a study of individuals in the social context in which they live. Topics such as attitudes and attitude change, altruism, effects of being in a group, conformity, obedience, persuasion, and interpersonal attraction are studied.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Social Psychology4
SOC 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Analyzes social problems of contemporary society: drugs; poverty; environment; delinquency; and gender, race, and ethnic relationships, among others.

Prerequisite(s):
SOC 201.
Social Problems4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SCI 246
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to general chemical principles, particularly emphasizing periodic properties, fundamental chemical calculations, formulas, equations, bonding, and nomenclature. Students develop selected chemistry lab skills through the practical application of techniques and procedures. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in MTH 108 or B- or better in MTH 111.
Chemistry I4
SCI 247
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands the principles of Chemistry I to include an in-depth investigation of quantum numbers and the study of precipitation, neutralization, and redox reactions. Also included is the investigation of molecular structures and the concept of chemical equilibrium. Students are also introduced to electrochemical principles and nuclear chemistry. 30 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
SCI 246.
Chemistry II4
SCI 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a comprehensive introduction to astronomy. Topics include the solar system, stars, galaxies, cosmology, and history of astronomy. Astronomical laboratory investigations are part of the course.

Principles of Astronomy4
SCI 451
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4 Quarter Hours

Explores the relationship between man and the environment. Students examine the balance between natural resources including wildlife, their habitats, and the needs of man in the twenty-first century.

Environmental Science4
Select 1 Course from the Following
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
SPK 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Practices individual formal presentations in a business context. The format includes a variety of speaking situations such as parliamentary procedure, briefings, sales, formal and informal discussions, and formal report presentations.

Prerequisite(s):
SPK 201.
Presentational Speaking4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 181

Program Description

This program offers students the opportunity to obtain a Bachelor of Science in Legal Studies and receive a quality higher education and appropriate training to enable them to be successful in their careers as paralegals. This program provides students with practical paralegal skills in conjunction with a well-rounded education in anticipation of their service in a modern, multicultural society. Highly competent graduates will be able to assist attorneys in various areas of law and in diverse legal settings. These objectives are met through carefully designed, application-driven academic requirements; practical internship experience; and academic advising throughout the program. A paralegal is qualified by education, training, or work experience who is employed or retained by a lawyer, law office, corporation, governmental agency, or other entity and who performs specifically delegated substantive legal work for which a lawyer is responsible. Paralegals may not provide legal services directly to the public except as permitted by law. This program has been approved by the American Bar Association at the Auburn Hills campus only.

Accreditation

External peer review is the primary means of assuring and improving the quality of higher education institutions and programs in the United States. This recognition is accomplished through program accreditation, approval or certification.

The Legal Studies Program has been approved by the American Bar Association at the Auburn Hills campus only.

Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Student Learning Outcomes
  • Upon graduation, the graduate of this degree program will find employment applicable to this course of study.
  • Conduct, organize, and evaluate legal research, as well as assemble necessary legal documents in order to adequately assist in the litigation process.
  • Evaluate and apply appropriate court rules, including rules of civil procedure and rules of evidence.
  • Examine and develop an understanding of legal processes as they relate to various substantive areas of law.
  • Develop and apply a command of the ethical guidelines and rules of professional responsibility necessary to demonstrate competence as a paralegal.
  • Obtain, analyze, synthesize, evaluate, and incorporate info into oral and written present. both in the class and the workplace.
  • Analyze the impact which differing political systems, cultural backgrounds, ethics, and values have on individuals in their personal, social, and work lives.
  • Synthesize and evaluate info and data using quantitative problem-solving processes.
  • Identify ethical principles and their application in the classroom and workplace.
  • Demonstrate the ability to apply the principles of scientific investigation to model and interpret scientific situations and to predict outcomes based on the analysis.

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Michele Favoretto
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Right after graduation I had a ton of confidence because I had this degree behind me.

Michele Favoretto