General education requirements must be met for all certificates of substantial length (68 or more quarter hours), as well as for associate and bachelor degree programs. Some degree programs may have general education requirements specific to the program that go beyond the basic requirements. Pre-requisites must be met, as required, for each general education course. In most degree programs, the general education requirements are met through general education curriculum. In some programs, however, general education outcomes are met through cognitive experiences, competencies, or application by courses in the major. All graduates must meet the general education outcome requirements established by each academic program.

FAQ'S

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

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General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

Request Information
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Baker totally prepared me to do my job. 

Marge Stoika

General Education RequirementsAssociate

General education requirements must be met for all certificates of substantial length (68 or more quarter hours), as well as for associate and bachelor degree programs. Some degree programs may have general education requirements specific to the program that go beyond the basic requirements. Pre-requisites must be met, as required, for each general education course. In most degree programs, the general education requirements are met through general education curriculum. In some programs, however, general education outcomes are met through cognitive experiences, competencies, or application by courses in the major. All graduates must meet the general education outcome requirements established by each academic program.

Course Information
Communication16 Hours

All of the following.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
Select 1 Course from the Following

ELECT 120A Communication Elective.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ENG 221
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies literary analysis and provides practice of methods used to analyze the contents of literary works; includes a review of major themes and schools of literary criticism.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Critical Writing and Literary Analysis4
ENG 231
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies how and why people communicate the way they do. Habitual talking, listening, and writing behaviors of individuals and groups are examined as well as the influences of the history of the English language, home, community, and culture on the language structures and language uses of individuals. Culture, as it influences linguistic preference, is studied.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Language and Culture4
ENG 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Expands students' writing skills beyond the expository style studied in Composition I and II and in the Workplace Communication course. This course studies poetry forms and fiction writing techniques. It is not necessary that a student be an experienced creative writer, only that he or she be committed to the writing process.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Creative Writing4
ENG 411
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies theory of behavior in communication in general and in mass media in particular. This course also focuses on the design and evaluation of public opinion studies and research topics in communication with an emphasis on the effects that various media have on consumers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Foundations of Mass Communication4
LIT 301
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4 Quarter Hours

Studies contemporary authors who may be classified as modern or postmodern; figures include principal ethnic and minority writers.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Contemporary Literature4
LIT 331
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from colonial times (1600) through the Civil War (1865). American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature I4
LIT 332
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4 Quarter Hours

Surveys American literature of various genres from Reconstruction (1865) to the present. American literary movements and their historical contexts are revealed through works representing a full range of American ethnicities. Students learn to critically analyze many types of literature through class discussion, activities, and writing.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
American Literature II4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
Mathematical Reasoning4 Hours

Select one of the following or a higher level math course.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
MTH 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Presents the application of mathematical skills to business functions to provide students with the basics needed to compute problems in the areas of simple interest, ratios, percentages, compound interest, annuities, and present values.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Mathematics for Business4
MTH 108
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, finance, and statistics. Key topics include personal finance, mathematical models, functions and relations, dimensional analysis, statistical reasoning, and Euclidean geometry. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
College Mathematics I: Reasoning and Application4
MTH 109
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4 Quarter Hours

Solves contemporary, real-world problems by mathematical reasoning utilizing concepts from algebra, right-triangle trigonometry, probability, and statistics. Key topics include equations, inequalities, graphs and functions; exponential, logarithmic, and quadratic models; counting methods, probability theory, normal distribution, correlation, and regression. This class focuses on quantitative literacy and the application of the above concepts in a variety of professional disciplines.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 108.
College Mathematics II4
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
MTH 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on data interpretation and practical application of introductory level statistics. Emphasizes a conceptual understanding of the use of statistics in various fields, including the ability to interpret results. Topics include development and analysis of descriptive statistics, inferential statistics, bivariate statistics, and multivariate statistics. Students determine appropriate statistical methods, calculate basic statistical values, and analyze/interpret data sets including statistical software study results.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Applied Statistics4
Personal and Social Environments4 Hours

Select one of the following.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ECN 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides an introduction to aggregate economic issues to include inflation, unemployment, and Gross Domestic Product (GDP); economic theories; market system; and the role of government.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Macroeconomics4
ECN 202
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the functions of individual business decision making, market structures, market failures, and the role of government within the economy.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 108 or MTH 111.
Principles of Microeconomics4
PSY 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation for understanding human relations with applications to both personal and professional growth. Focus is on examining the basic dynamics of human relations, how social influences shape thought and behavior, effective ways to develop skills of human relations, and the importance of multicultural competency within human relations.

Human Relations4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
Computer Literacy8 Hours

Three of the following.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
Select 3 Courses from the Following

ELECT 161A, ELECT 161B, and ELECT 161C Computer Literacy Electives.

Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
INF 112
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to word processing software and applications. This will include demonstrating the ability to perform basic Windows operations commands and word processing commands, which include creating, saving, printing, formatting, editing, and retrieving documents.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Word Processing2
INF 113
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to beginning electronic spreadsheet terminology, concepts, and applications. Students will gain the ability to enter/edit, save/retrieve files, format, and print spreadsheets and reports. Students are also introduced to basic formula development.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Electronic Spreadsheets2
INF 114A
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces beginning database terminology, concepts, and applications using a file management software program. Students will demonstrate an understanding of data hierarchy; the ability to design simple files, edit file content, print file content, and simple reports; and the ability to search and sort files and use pre-existing formulas.

Prerequisite(s):
WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Introduction to Database Applications2
INF 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the basics of using the Microsoft Windows environment. The areas of exploration will include the Start Button, Task Bar, My Computer, Windows Explorer, Customizing Displays, Paint, and the use of shortcuts.

Introduction to Windows2
INF 141A
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in the use of Microsoft PowerPoint to develop computer-based presentations. Topics include creating slides, handouts, speaker's notes, and outlines as well as the use of PowerPoint Wizards and Templates.

Microsoft PowerPoint2
Mission & Goals

The mission of Baker College is to provide quality higher education and training which enable graduates to be successful throughout challenging and rewarding careers. Required courses in the major field of study are complemented and enhanced by required general education courses. General education provides a foundation of knowledge and skills that every educated person should possess. Its purpose is to stimulate curiosity and promote intellectual inquiry and lifelong learning.

General Education Mission Statement
General education provides students with an array of critical skills and knowledge essential to the college-educated person in any career path and builds a foundation for more specialized learning.

General Education Goals

  1. To provide students with opportunities to develop and refine essential skills in written and oral communication, mathematical reasoning, scientific inquiry, global and cultural awareness, personal and social relations, and information literacy
  2. To teach a body of common knowledge necessary for students to be successful in professional, intellectual, and social contexts
  3. To assist students in developing a breadth of knowledge, curiosity, and critical thinking skills
  4. To promote informed citizenship in an increasingly diverse world
  5. To advocate lifelong learning
Institutional Student Learning Outcomes

Baker College Institutional Student Learning Outcomes are the General Education Outcomes:

  1. Career-ready knowledge and skills
  2. Attitudes and behaviors that promote success in the workplace and effective social interaction with diverse people
  3. Information literacy which includes recognizing the need for information and identifying, locating, evaluating, and effectively using that information 
  4. Effective communication in various academic and career settings using technology as appropriate
  5. Critical thinking including analysis, synthesis, and problem solving which are applicable to the field of study, the workplace, and other life situations
  6. Broad-based knowledge which includes an understanding of cultural, ethical, social, political, and global issues

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FAQ's

  • How can I send a copy of my official transcripts to another organization?

    To access your transcripts, log into the SOLAR System, select the Star System and select the Academic Office. Once there, click on the transcripts link.

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org.

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by The Higher Learning Commission / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

    Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • Load More FAQ'S
Testimonial Image
Testimonial quote

Baker totally prepared me to do my job. 

Marge Stoika