Your skill and accuracy counts every day.

Prepare for a career where you truly make a difference.

Radiation therapists are critical members of the medical team that treats patients with cancer and other diseases. They work closely with patients over a period of several months, providing radiation therapy prescribed by a radiologist, according to established practices and standards. Radiation therapists are also responsible for preparing equipment and protection devices, and maintaining patient records and files.

Discover Your
New Career

FAQ'S

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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Program Availability

Program availability varies by campus. Please contact the Admissions Department on your campus to learn more.

General Requirements

A general education core is required for all Associate and Bachelor degrees. All graduates must meet the general education requirements established by each academic program.

College Success Strategies (COL111A) or College Success Online (COL112) is required for all first-time freshmen and all online students enrolled in a certificate or degree program. This course will inform students of campus services, policies and procedures, and address learning styles and study strategies.

Many of the courses and programs at Baker College are offered in an online delivery format. See Online Programs. Contact your campus Academic / Administrative Office for details about online courses.

Getting Started

There's a lot you can learn about Baker College here on the Web, but talking with an admissions advisor will help you get a better understanding of everything we offer. Contact us to request more information, schedule a visit to the campus nearest you, or get started by applying online.

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Testimonial quote

I feel that the instructors really work with you; they are really helpful. It’s changed my life.

Shawna Vanderhoef
Radiation Therapy Bachelor Degree from Baker College

Radiation TherapyBachelor of Radiation Therapy

Your skill and accuracy counts every day.

Prepare for a career where you truly make a difference.

Radiation therapists are critical members of the medical team that treats patients with cancer and other diseases. They work closely with patients over a period of several months, providing radiation therapy prescribed by a radiologist, according to established practices and standards. Radiation therapists are also responsible for preparing equipment and protection devices, and maintaining patient records and files.

Discover Your Future Radiation Therapy Career

Career Facts

$77,560

Median salary for Radiation Therapists

24%

Estimated employment increase by 2022

$103,220

Median salary for Radiation Therapy Dosimetrist

View citations
Overview

Baker’s Radiation Therapy bachelor degree program provides the in-depth knowledge and skills you need to succeed as a radiation therapist. 

Our curriculum—developed through the input of Advisory Boards in the field and taught by experienced radiation therapists—blends studies in mathematics, medical science, and psychology with lab work and actual clinical experience.

You gain all the knowledge, insights, and full range of skills essential to the practice of radiation therapy, and graduate fully prepared to begin your career.

Course Information
Radiation Therapy Major Requirements123 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
HSC 151
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to health informatics, with primary focus on the function of electronic health records (EHR) systems in health care delivery. Emphasis will be directed toward interdisciplinary use of an EHR to enhance quality and safety in patient care. Students will learn to use EHR software, access a patient account, create a patient file, and to enter and retrieve data. Compliance with HIPAA and confidentiality will be introduced.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 101, WPG 098 or high school typing/proficiency.
Introduction to Electronic Health Records2
MED 103
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the fundamentals of word analysis by body system and emphasizes the spelling, pronunciation, and definitions of medical terms.

Medical Terminology4
MTH 401
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to data analysis, data-driven decision making, and various statistical methods including their applications. Methods covered include measures of central tendency, probability distributions, sampling, and regression analysis.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 109 or MTH 112.
Statistical Methods4
RDT 171
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4 Quarter Hours

Gives students an overview of radiation therapy and its contribution to the health care team. This course addresses such topics as professional standards of competencies, accreditation, credentialing, professional organizations, and career mobility. Additionally, students will explore current oncology problems, theories of cancer development, cancer prevention, cancer management, treatment techniques, and protocols used in providing optimal cancer management. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Introduction to Radiation Therapy4
RDT 221
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5 Quarter Hours

Establishes a knowledge base in factors that govern and influence the production and recording of radiographic images for patient simulation, treatment planning, and treatment verification in radiation oncology. Radiation oncology imaging equipment and related devices will be emphasized. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Imaging and Processing in Radiation Oncology5
RDT 231
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2 Quarter Hours

Exposes the radiation therapy student to basic concepts of patient care, chemotherapy protocols, agents and side effects, oncologic problems, and emergencies as well as psychological aspects of the cancer patient that will confront students in the medical setting. Emphasis on the total patient is presented with regard to the patient s physical, psychological, social, and spiritual needs. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Patient Care Management2
RDT 261
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides an in-depth presentation of cell response to radiation. Factors which influence the effects of radiation, tissue sensitivity, and environmental responses are discussed. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Radiobiology2
RDT 311
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces basic physics concepts and their relationship to radiation and protection. This course covers forces, matter and energy, heat and heat transfer, waves, light, electricity and magnetism, atomic physics, and radioactivity. Properties and production of x-rays, radiation, interactions with matter, radiation exposure, x-ray tubes, and circuitry are included. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Radiation Therapy Physics I4
RDT 312
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4 Quarter Hours

Focuses on the principles of radiation therapy physics and protection and how they relate to the operation of radiation therapy equipment, fundamental procedures in dose measurement and certification, and machine calibration as well as radioactive materials. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 311.
Radiation Therapy Physics II4
RDT 321A
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides students with an understanding of 3-D medical imaging and its value to radiation therapy in relationship to tumor localization, volume visualization, treatment planning, visualization of normal and abnormal anatomy, and 3-D patient geometry as well as the machinery used to produce the images. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 341.
Sectional Anatomy4
RDT 331
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5 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the various treatment machines, recordkeeping mechanisms, treatment planning processes, etc., in the clinical education center. This course is a hands-on laboratory conducted at the clinical education center(s) for 160 hours. Some evening labs may be required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 231 and student background check.
Introduction to Clinical Practicum I5
RDT 332
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5 Quarter Hours

Continues the student's experience with the various treatment machines, recordkeeping mechanisms, treatment planning processes, etc., in the clinical education center. This course is a hands-on laboratory conducted at the clinical education center(s) for 160 hours. Some early morning or evening labs may be required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 331.
Introduction to Clinical Practicum II5
RDT 341
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5 Quarter Hours

Provides an overview of cancer and the specialty of radiation therapy. The historic and current aspects of cancer treatment will be covered. The roles and responsibilities of the radiation therapist will be discussed. In addition, treatment prescription, techniques, and delivery will be covered. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Acceptance in the program.
Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy I5
RDT 342
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5 Quarter Hours

Examines and evaluates the management of neoplastic disease using knowledge in arts and sciences, while promoting critical thinking and the basis of ethical clinical decision making. The epidemiology, etiology, detection, diagnosis, patient condition, treatment, and prognosis of neoplastic disease will be presented, discussed, and evaluated in relation to histology, anatomical site, and patterns of spread. The radiation therapist's responsibility in the management of neoplastic disease will be examined and linked to the skills required to analyze complex issues and make informed decisions while appreciating the scope of the profession. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 341.
Principles and Practice of Radiation Therapy II5
RDT 421
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5 Quarter Hours

Introduces students to the concepts of treatment planning, i.e., external beam (photon and electron) techniques, depth dose, isodose curves, summation of plans, and manual and computer calculations. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 312.
Dosimetry I5
RDT 422
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5 Quarter Hours

Continues the concepts of treatment planning, including but not limited to, irregular field techniques, moving beam therapy, and brachytherapy with manual and computer calculations. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 421.
Dosimetry II5
RDT 451
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1 Quarter Hours

Provides students with the chance to express his/her knowledge of the principles of oncology management, normal/abnormal cytology, pathology, radiation reactions, and patient care, for specific anatomical sites. This is the first course in a series of independent study courses. Students will state the multidisciplinary modality treatments and rationale for these treatments based on the anatomical site of interest. All objectives are based on knowledge previously acquired in the radiation therapy didactic courses and clinical practicums. This is a 9 week course. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Senior Seminar I1
RDT 452
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students the chance to express his/her knowledge of principles of oncology management, normal/abnormal cytology, pathology, radiation reactions, and patient care for specific anatomical sites. This is the second in a series of four independent study courses. Students will state the multidisciplinary modality treatments and rationale for these treatments based on the anatomical site of interest. All objectives are based on knowledge previously acquired in the radiation therapy technology didactic courses and clinical practicums. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 451.
Senior Seminar II2
RDT 453
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students the chance to express his/her knowledge of oncology management. This is the third in a series of four independent study courses. The emphasis shifts to specific case histories for which students will be required to analyze the contents of the history and define the expected treatment/outcome. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 452.
Senior Seminar III2
RDT 454
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2 Quarter Hours

Provides students the chance to express his/her knowledge of oncology management. This is the fourth and final course in a series of four independent studies. The emphasis continues on specific case histories for which students will be required to analyze the contents of the history and define the expected treatment/outcome. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 453.
Senior Seminar IV2
RDT 461
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides the principles and concepts of quality management/assurance as they relate to radiation therapy and regulatory bodies. Topics will include quality improvement programs (QI) in radiation oncology, continuous quality improvement (CQI) project: quality control and assurance checks for patient care, medical records, treatment delivery, localization, and treatment planning equipment. Human resource concepts and regulations impacting the radiation therapist will be examined. Accreditation agencies and the radiation therapist's role in the accreditation process will be emphasized. Billing and reimbursement issues pertinent to the radiation therapy department will be presented. The legal and regulatory implications for maintaining appropriate quality care will be discussed. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 422.
Quality Management and Operational Issues in Radiation Therapy4
RDT 471
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8 Quarter Hours

Provides hands-on opportunities at clinical education centers. This is the first in a series of four courses. Students actively participate/observe simulation, treatment planning, custom block making, treatments, and patient care procedures. Students will also attend tumor and other relevant conferences to enhance their knowledge of cancer and its processes, which in turn allows them to procure the skills/competencies necessary to become a radiation therapist. All objectives are competency based. This is a 9 week course. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
Program Director/Dean approval.
Clinical Practicum I8
RDT 472
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8 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in a radiation oncology center. This is the second in a series of four courses. Students will continue to actively participate in all aspects of radiation therapy with an emphasis on competency-based objectives. 240 clinical hours are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 471.
Clinical Practicum II8
RDT 473
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8 Quarter Hours

Provides students with hands-on experience in a radiation oncology center. This course is the third in a series of four courses. Students will continue to actively participate in all aspects of radiation therapy with an emphasis on competency-based objectives. 240 clinical hours are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 472.
Clinical Practicum III8
RDT 474
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8 Quarter Hours

Provides students the opportunity to actively participate in all aspects of radiation therapy with an emphasis on competency-based objectives. This is the fourth and final course. Students are expected to perform all assignments at the level of an entry-level radiation therapist. 240 clinical hours are required. This course description is derived from ASRT Radiation Therapy Professional Curriculum 2009.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in RDT 473.
Clinical Practicum IV8
SCI 101C
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5 Quarter Hours

Deals with the fundamental study of the body with a view toward the structure and function of body parts, organs, and systems and their relationship to the whole body. Laboratory work may include the use of the microscope, experiments/demonstrations in physiologic principles, and the dissection of animal parts. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Anatomy and Physiology I5
SCI 102C
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5 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes the structure and function of the various body systems. Laboratory work will include the dissection of mammal organs. 40 hours of lecture and 20 hours of lab are required.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 101C.
Anatomy and Physiology II5
SCI 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines general disease mechanisms with an emphasis on the disease processes within each body system.

Prerequisite(s):
B- or better in SCI 102C.
Pathophysiology4
WRK 291B
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1 Quarter Hours

Covers all phases of securing employment in a required seminar. Major topics include resume preparation, interview strategy, job application, job search action planning, personal appearance, and coordination of the graduate's employment search activity with the College Career Services Office. Students in degree programs may complete the seminar requirement any time during their final two quarters. Certificate students should attend in their last quarter.

Prerequisite(s):
Sophomore status.
Professional Career Strategies1
General Education Requirements66 Hours
Course NumberCourse TitleCredit Hours
ELECT 131A
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 131B
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4 Quarter Hours

See General Education Electives List - Global and Cultural Perspectives Electives (Bachelor Degree)

Global and Cultural Perspectives Elective4
ELECT 161A
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2 Quarter Hours

See General Information Elective List - Computer Literacy Electives.

Computer Literacy Elective2
ENG 101
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4 Quarter Hours

Emphasizes academic writing by reading and thinking critically to strengthen essential communication skills through the use of the writing process. Various assignments focus on summary and response, analysis, and informative writing. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 091 or satisfies developmental writing or placement exam, ENG 098B or satisfies developmental reading or placement exam.
Composition I4
ENG 102
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4 Quarter Hours

Continues developing students' critical thinking and writing skills through reading and argumentative writing. Emphasizes academic writing to articulate the relationships among language, knowledge, and power. Various assignments focus on position, argument analysis, and argumentative proposal. Research practices and research writing in APA style are essential to the course.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in ENG 101 or placement exam and approved writing sample.
Composition II4
HUM 401A
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the philosophical foundations for personal and professional ethics. Students identify and analyze ethical situations in modern society.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Philosophy of Ethics4
INF 161
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2 Quarter Hours

Explores timely social, legal, philosophical, ethical, political, constitutional, and economic implications of computing and technology. Coverage of the issues related to a technological society including social networking, privacy topics such as cameras in cell phones, access to our search queries and all sorts of data we put on the Web, social networking, location tracking, high-tech surveillance systems, intellectual property, professional ethics and responsibilities, and crime.

Technology and Society2
MTH 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Introduces elements of algebra including real numbers, linear graphing, variable expressions, linear equations, polynomial operations and factoring, systems of equations, quadratic equations, and rational functions.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 099E or satisfies developmental pre-algebra or placement exam.
Introductory Algebra4
MTH 112
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines more advanced elements of algebra including rational functions, quadratic equations, radical expressions, complex numbers, exponential functions, and logarithmic functions.

Prerequisite(s):
C or better in MTH 111.
Intermediate Algebra4
PSY 111
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4 Quarter Hours

Provides a foundation of knowledge in psychology examining key topics related to understanding human thoughts and behavior. Topics include an exploration of factors that influence thoughts and behavior, psychology as a science, sensation/perception, motivation, emotion, memory, cognition, personality, as well as key figures, research, and theories within psychology. Applying concepts to real-life settings is a focus throughout the course.

General Psychology4
PSY 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Equips students with a psychological foundation of theory related to death, dying, and bereavement. Prepares students who are entering a helping profession to work with others to understand and cope with death, dying, and bereavement.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111.
Psychology of Death and Dying4
SCI 121
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2 Quarter Hours

Introduces various topics in physics. Motion, energy, and the dynamics of particles are investigated. The physical concepts of fluid mechanics, thermodynamics, and wave motion are explored as well as selected topics in atomic and nuclear physics.

Prerequisite(s):
MTH 109 or MTH 112.
Physics Concepts2
SOC 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines social organization, culture, and the relationship between society and the individual. The areas studied are social groups, roles and statuses, institutions, social stratification, socialization, social change, and social policy.

Sociology4
SOC 321
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4 Quarter Hours

Examines the social construction of groups based on race, ethnicity and national origin, religion, gender, age, sexual orientation, and able-bodiedness. Sociological (as well as psychological, historical, economic, and anthropological) perspectives are applied to concepts such as prejudice, stereotyping, discrimination, racial and ethnic identity, racial formation, power and privilege, assimilation and pluralism, and tolerance. Emphasis is on increasing knowledge, personal awareness, and sensitivity.

Cultural Diversity4
SPK 201
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4 Quarter Hours

Develops confidence and skill in many facets of oral communication. Students explore diverse topics and formats, using both organization and research to support themselves during oral presentations.

Oral Communication4
SPK 211
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4 Quarter Hours

Integrates and applies knowledge gained from the oral communication and human relations classes. Specifically, small group communication in work and social organizations, both verbal and nonverbal, is the primary focus.

Prerequisite(s):
PSY 101 or PSY 111, SPK 201.
Group Dynamics4
WRI 115
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4 Quarter Hours

Addresses professional standards of communication with a focus on 21st century technology. Continues  developing students' critical thinking and writing skills to prepare them to be effective communicators in the workplace. Students evaluate the audience before choosing and applying the appropriate communication medium and style. Required elements include an employment portfolio, a group project/presentation, and an exploration of communication in the student's individual career field.

Prerequisite(s):
ENG 102.
Workplace Communication4
WRI 301A
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4 Quarter Hours

Improves the student's ability to write for business and technical purposes. Emphasis is on writing formal reports including research of published technical information and presentation of a formal paper based on the student's major field. In addition, less formal aspects of business and technical communications are studied. Instruction, practice, and development of these skills may be implemented as work products of a Service Learning Project.

Prerequisite(s):
WRI 115.
Report Writing4

Quarter Hours Required for Graduation: 189

Program Description

This program is an allied health discipline, which utilizes radiation for the treatment of cancer and cancer related diseases. The radiation therapist plays an integral role in the management team of physicians, physicists, and other allied health personnel. The professional has the unique opportunity to blend knowledge and skills of mathematics, medical science, and psychology in his or her everyday work. The radiation therapist has the opportunity of knowing patients over a period of several months, and becoming an integral part of their health care. Program Status: Limited Enrollment.

As a Radiation Therapist, you work closely with a team of physicians, physicists, and other allied health personnel, utilizing radiation for the treatment of cancer and cancer-related diseases. In this profession, you often work with patients over a period of several months, and become an integral part of their health care.

Essential Functions

These technical standards reflect performance abilities and characteristics that are necessary to successfully complete the requirements of the program at Baker College. These standards are not conditions of admission to the program. Persons interested in applying for admission to the program should review this information to develop a better understanding of the physical abilities and behavioral characteristics necessary to successfully complete the program. The College complies with the requirements and spirit of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990. Therefore, the College will endeavor to make reasonable accommodations for participants with disabilities who are otherwise qualified.

  • Effectively communicate in English, both verbally and in writing, utilizing accurate and appropriate terminology with classmates, co-workers, clients, and providers in person and through a telephone.
  • Access information from books, reference manuals, computers, and paper and electronic medical records to accurately perform functions and duties.
  • Explain procedures and treatment appropriate to patient's level of understanding including what will be required while respecting patient confidentiality and privacy (i.e. what to expect during the procedure, proper skin care, maintenance of the treatment field markings and correct diet during course of treatment).
  • Assess patient physical condition, the presence of any side effects or treatment related problems, recognize any errors in delivery of treatment and effectively communicate information to radiation oncologist and other members of the patient care team.
  • Accurately document treatment delivered and changes in the prescribed course of treatment in the patient record.
  • Monitor and respond to patient and accessory medical equipment directly and by intercommunication system during procedure to assess patient response and safety.
  • Obtain optimum image quality for review with radiation oncologist for approval or field modification.
  • Accurately obtain precise measurements and determine appropriate immobilization and positioning aids needed for use in treatment planning and safe delivery of radiation.
  • Provide safe and effective care including but not limited to administration of oral or rectal contrast medium, preparation, and application of bolus material, etc.
  • Utilize equipment safely to fabric individualized immobilization devices and to create custom beam shaping devices (e.g., blocks, MLC) and other beam modifying devices (e.g., compensators, wedges).
  • Perform and document warm-up procedures and quality assurance checks on imaging and treatment equipment (e.g., dose rate verificatioin, positioning lasers, all interlocks, collision safety system, optical distance indicator, emergency switches).
  • Recognize potentially hazardous materials, equipment, and situations and proceed safely in order to minimize risk of injury to patients, self, and nearby individuals by referencing, utilizing and adhering to OSHA requirements such as MSDS (Material Safety Data Sheets), universal precautions and radiation safety standards, and policies and procedures.
  • Demonstrate appropriate professional and procedural judgment decisions under stressful and/or emergency conditions (i.e. allergic reaction or cardiac arrest) and a distracting environment (i.e., high noise levels, crowding, complex visual stimuli).
  • Adhere to HIPAA, American Society of Radiologic Technologists (ASRT) professional standards, Baker College professional conduct guidelines, program requirements and clinical site policies and procedures. 
  • For the task inventory for Radiation Therapists go to the ARRT Web site (ARRT.org) and go to Practice Analysis select task inventory and thenselect radiation therapy.

The scope of practice of the medical imaging and radiation therapy professionals includes:

  • Corroborating patient's clinical history with procedure, ensuring information is documented and available for use by a licensed independent practitioner
  • Verifying informed consent
  • Assuming responsibility for patient needs during procedures
  • Preparing patients for procedures
  • Applying principles of ALARA to minimize exposure to patient, self and others
  • Performing venipuncture as prescribed by a licensed independent practitioner.
  • Starting and maintaining intravenous access as prescribed by a licensed independent practitioner.
  • Identifying, preparing and/or administering medications as prescribed by a licensed independent practitioner
  • Evaluating images for technical quality, ensuring proper identification is recorded
  • Identifying and managing emergency situations
  • Providing education
  • Educating and monitoring students and other health care providers
  • Performing ongoing quality assurance activities

The scope of practice of the radiation therapist also includes:

  • Delivering radiation therapy treatments as prescribed by a radiation oncologist
  • Performing simulation, treatment planning procedures and dosimetric calculations as prescribed by a radiation oncologist
  • Utilizing imaging technologies for the explicit purpose of simulation, treatment planning and treatment delivery as prescribed by a radiation oncologist
  • Detecting and reporting significant changes in patients' conditions and determining when to withhold treatment until the physician is consulted
  • Monitoring doses to normal tissues withing the irradiated volume to ensure tolerance levels are not exceeded
  • Constructing/preparing immobilization, beam directional and beam modification devices
  • Participating in brachytherapy procedures
Mission, Goals & Student Learning Outcomes

Radiation Therapy Program Mission

The Mission of the Baker College Radiation Therapy Program is to provide a high quality education that will enable our graduates to have successful careers in radiation therapy. This is accomplished by providing:

  • Access to state of the art equipment both in our labs and at our clinical facilities.
  • A bachelor degree level curriculum.
  • Competency based clinical rotations at a variety of clinical facilities.

Goals & Student Learning Outcomes

To that end the following goals have been established:

1. Our students will demonstrate effective oral and written communication skills.

Student learning outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate effective oral communication skills.
  • Students will exhibit proficient written communication skills.

2. Our students will demonstrate critical thinking and problem solving.

Student learning outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate critical thinking skills to solve a given problem.
  • Students will demonstrate ability to recognize correct field positioning.

3. Our students will demonstrate professionalism.

Student learning outcomes:

  • Students will demonstrate professionalism at clinic
  • Students will produce a plan for their professional career development.

4. Our graduates will be clinically competent entry level radiation therapists

Student learning outcome:

  • Students will demonstrate ability to ensure patient safety.
  • Students will demonstrate correct radiation safety protection.
Program Effectiveness Data

Program Effectiveness Data

The program is accredited by the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology (JRCERT).

JRCERT
20 N. Wacker Drive, Suite 2850
Chicago, IL 60606-3182
Phone: (312) 704-5300
Fax: (312) 704-5304
http://www.jrcert.org

The following information was included in the Baker College Radiation Therapy program’s Annual Report to JRCERT for the class of 2013.

Program Completion Rate for the class of 2013 = 88%
The program’s completion rate for 2013 was 88%. Of the 16 students accepted into the class of 2013 cohort—14 students completed the program. (14/16)

5 Year Credentialing Exam Pass Rate (2009-2013) = 88%
The number of students passing the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) Radiation Therapy certification examination on their first attempt within six months of graduation from the program for this five year timeframe was 88%. There were 52 first-time test takers during this period. 2 of these candidates did not take the exam within 6 months of completing the program. Of the 50 graduates taking the exam 6 months post-graduation—44 passed. (44/50)

Job Placement Rate (2009-2013) =84%
This number reflects a five year average of employment within 12 months of graduation for program graduates who were actively seeking employment. Thirty-eight of the 45 graduates who were actively seeking employment became employed. (38/45)

Application Information

Prospective Students

An online application is available for Undergraduate and Graduate admission. You may also print the Application for Undergraduate Admission and apply through mail, or at the campus nearest you.

Returning Students

Returning students do not need to re-apply. Please contact the Academic Office on the campus that you plan to attend about returning to Baker College.

Current Students

The Student must complete and submit a formal application to the Radiation Therapy Program. The application and all forms must be received by the Program Director by Friday of Week 10 of the Spring Quarter in the year the student is applying for Admissions.

Full acceptance into the professional track of some programs is limited due to clinical site availability. Students compete to earn acceptance into these programs. Selection criteria have been developed to choose the most qualified students for limited enrollment programs.  Students who have successfully completed the conditional acceptance requirements for their program are eligible to apply for full acceptance in to the professional track of the program. Refer to the program information supplement for program specific details on the application process, the criteria used, and the courses used in the GPA calculations.

Once selected through the limited enrollment criteria, for full acceptance into a program, students must complete program requirements including, but not limited to: program specific orientations, background checks, drug screens, etc. Please contact your campus official for additional information.

 

Accreditation

The Radiation Therapy Program is accredited through the Joint Review Committee on Education in Radiologic Technology, 20 Wacker Drive, Suite 2850, Chicago, IL 60606-3182, Phone: (312) 704-5300, Fax: (312)-704-5304. Web address: www.jrcert.org

Accredited by The Higher Learning Commission and a member of the North Central Association / 230 South LaSalle St., Suite 7-500, Chicago, IL 60604-1411 / 800-621-7440 / www.ncahlc.org

Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

Campus Contact

Jackson

Terilynn Fedchenko , MSA, R.T.(R)(T), (ARRT)
Program Director, Baker College Radiation Therapy Program
(517) 780-4562
teri.fedchenko@baker.edu

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FAQ's

  • Is Baker accredited?

    Yes. Baker College is regionally accredited—the highest level of accreditation awarded in the U.S.—by The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois  60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: www.ncahlc.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Additional Accreditations

    Baker has also earned specialized accreditations for programs and degrees in: 

    • Business Administration
    • Early Childhood Learning
    • Engineering and Technology
    • Health Sciences
    • School of Nursing

    For details about these specialized accreditations, see the individual Programs and Degrees pages. 

  • Does Baker provide any help in my job search?


    As a graduate of Baker College, you are eligible for our Lifetime Employment Services, which include:

    • Job searching techniques
    • Resume and cover letter assistance
    • Job interview questions
    • Job postings
    • Relocation tips

     

  • Is Baker College Online accredited?

    Baker Online is part of Baker College, a private, non-profit, regionally accredited, degree granting, higher educational institution with locations throughout Michigan.

    As an accredited college, Baker College has been granted legal authority by the state of Michigan to operate as a nonprofit educational corporation and is empowered to grant certificates, associate, bachelor, master, and doctoral degrees. It is approved for veterans’ benefits. Baker College is recognized as an institution of higher education by the U.S. Secretary of Education, U.S. Department of Education.

    All Baker Online undergraduate and graduate programs are accredited by the following regional institutional accreditor: The Higher Learning Commission, A Commission of the North Central Association of Colleges and Schools, 30 North LaSalle Street, Suite 2400, Chicago, Illinois 60602-2504; (800) 621-7440; Web address: http://www.hlcommission.org. Baker College is an Academic Quality Improvement Program (AQIP) participant.

    Some Baker Online graduate programs have additional accreditation:

  • How do online classes work?


    After you enroll, and are accepted to your online program, you sign-up, or "register" for your first courses. Like all Baker Online students, you will begin your online experience with a three-week online class designed to orient you to the Baker Online classroom, and review the expectations and requirements of Baker Online students. When you have completed this course successfully, you can move on to additional online courses.

  • How do I apply for a student loan?

    Once you have applied for financial aid, you will receive a Financial Aid Notification package from the Financial Aid office. Your FAFSA serves as the application for the Student Loan. If it is determined that you qualify for student loan funds, the eligibility amounts will be listed on your award notification, and a student Loan Request Form will be included with the award package. The Loan Request Form must be completed and returned to the Financial Aid Office before the loan process can begin.

    If you are a new student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Complete the paper loan request form indicating the amount you would like to borrow.
    • Sign and date the form.
    • Return the form to the Financial Aid office.

    If you are a returning student and would like to request student loan funds to help cover your educational expenses you will need to:

    • Log into the SOLAR system.
    • Select STAR System.
    • Select Financial Aid office.
    • Select Loan Request.
    • Select the appropriate financial aid year and click Continue.
    • Select the type of loan you would like to request and click Continue.
    • Read the Stafford Loan Request Authorization information and click I Agree.
    • Type in the requested dollar amount and click Submit Request.
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